Human Rights and Personal Self-Defense in International Law

Author: Jan Arno Hessbruegge

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019065502X

Category:

Page: 400

View: 4544

Based on author's thesis (doctoral - European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany, 2016) isued under title: The right to personal self-defence as a general principle of law and its general application in international human rights law.

Origins of the Right of Self-Defence in International Law

From the Caroline Incident to the United Nations Charter

Author: Tadashi Mori

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004355006

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 3755

This book defines the right of self-defence as understood in and before 1945 and offers a possible better alternative for interpreting the significance of the precondition provided for in the Article 51 of the United Nations Charter.

Self-defence in International Law

Author: D. W. Bowett

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 1584778555

Category: Law

Page: 294

View: 6716

Bowett, D.W.Self-Defence in International Law. New York: Praeger, [1958]. xv, 294 pp. Reprinted 2009 by The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN-13: 978-1-58477-855-4. ISBN-10: 1-58477-855-5. Cloth. $95.* Bowett observes that the use or threat of force by any state can be a delict, an approved sanction, or a measure taken in self-defense. He examines the evolution of the doctrine in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with the assumption of the existence of a state's unlimited 'right' to go to war. He then attempts to outline the limited and provisional effects of this right under the U.N. Charter. "Throughout the work there is a refusal to dogmatize or to state in absolute terms any aspect of the 'privilege' of self-defence in its present context. (...) [Bowett] is to be congratulated on producing a timely and scholarly survey of one of the most fundamental, and often abused, sovereign rights known to international law.": K.R. Simmonds, British Year Book of International Law 34 (1958) 432.

Self-Defense in International Relations

Author: R. Anand

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230245749

Category: Political Science

Page: 191

View: 8350

The right to individual and collective self-defense in international law and politics has always been a controversial issue. Using the example of how the US employs self-defense against Iraq, this book uncovers new dimensions, which lead to innovative and practical strategies and analysis.

The Right of Individual Self-Defense in Public International Law

Author: Jan Kittrich

Publisher: Logos Verlag Berlin GmbH

ISBN: 3832519556

Category: Law

Page: 219

View: 8511

The book examines in detail one of the most controversial topic in current international law, namely the scope and extent of the right of individual self-defense. The book carefully traces the paths which have been followed in the developing legal debate on self-defense. The author uses numerous case-studies of incidents involving the use of force in alleged self-defense (such as the Entebbe Incident 1976, the Nicaragua Case 1986 or the Israeli-Lebanese conflict of 2006) which have formed the central point of scholarly debate. The author's conclusions are based not only on thorough analysis of academic discussions but also of the practice of States and international bodies, especially of the United Nations Organization. At the outset of the book the author reviews the historical context and the customary evolution of the right of self-defense. Reference is made to the famous Caroline Case of 1837, which set the necessary conditions of lawful exercise of self-defense. Next, the author examines the concept and legal nature of self-defense, carefully assessing the customary conditions of necessity, proportionality and immediacy derived from the Caroline Case. As the occurrence of an "armed attack" is a conditio sine qua non of lawful invocation of self-defense, several modalities of an armed attack are attentively evaluated such as its constituent elements, beginning or scale. The author explores, whether reactions to acts of international terrorism committed by a non-State may be based on the right of self-defense. In times of global terrorist networks it is highly desirable to attach special attention to use of force in self-defense as a remedy against serious acts of terrorism. Thorough analysis of State practice is shown on several examples from recent history - the U.S. air raid on Libya in 1986 and on Baghdad in 1993 and relatively recent air strikes on Sudan and Afghanistan in 1998. Reference is also made to the most striking example - the Al-Qaeda attack on the United States in 2001. The validity of claims of anticipatory/preventive self-defense is examined on a theoretical level and then applied to the specific details of the Israeli air strike on the Osiraq Nuclear Reactor in 1981. The two main approaches to preventive self-defense - "restrictive" and "traditional" - are then discussed in detail. Brief analysis is also devoted to the nature of the so-called - pre-emptive - self-defense indicating its current position under international law.

Self-Defense Against the Use of Force in International Law

Author: Stanimir A. Alexandrov

Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers

ISBN: 9789041102478

Category: Law

Page: 359

View: 4214

Iz vsebine: 1. Samoobramba v obdobju pred Ligo narodov, 2. Dogovor Lige narodov, 3. Pariška pogodba, 4. 51. člen Listine Združenih narodov, 5. Individualna samoobramba, 6. Praksa kolektivne samoobrambe (s strani tretje države, regionalne organizacije, skupine držav s popolno odobritvijo Združenih narodov), sklepi: samoobramba kot poglavitna sestavina kolektivnega varnostnega sistema in kot oblika dela za pospeševanje mednarodnega miru.

The International Court of Justice and Self-defence in International Law

Author: James A. Green

Publisher: Hart Pub Limited

ISBN: 9781841138763

Category: Law

Page: 229

View: 9554

The legal rules governing the use of force between States are one of the most fundamental, and the most controversial, aspects of international law. An essential part of this subject is the question of when, and to what extent, a State may lawfully use force against another in self-defence. However, the parameters of this inherent right remain obscure, despite the best efforts of scholars and, notably, the International Court of Justice.This book examines the burgeoning relationship between the ICJ and the right of self-defence. Since 2003 there have been three major decisions of the ICJ that have dealt directly with the law governing self-defence actions, in contrast to only two such cases in the preceding fifty years. This, then, is an opportune moment to reconsider the jurisprudence of the Court on this issue. This book is the first of its kind to comprehensively draw together and then assess the merits of this jurisprudence. It argues that the contribution of the ICJ has been confused and unhelpful, and compounds inadequacies in existing customary international law. The ICJ's fundamental conception of a primary criterion of 'armed attack' as constituting a qualitatively grave use of force is brought into question. The book then goes on to examine the underlying causes of the problems that have emerged in the jurisprudence on this crucial issue.Winner of the American Society of International Law's Lieber Society Book Prize 2009Dr Green's monograph demonstrates a thorough understanding of the law of self-defence, coupled with an informed and evaluative discussion of the role and function of the International Court. It is an impressive analysis of the International Court of Justice's jurisprudence on self-defence.Professor Iain Scobbie, Judge of the American Society of International Law's Lieber Society Book Prize 2009, Sir Joseph Hotung Research Professor, School of Oriental and African Studies, LondonJames Green's "The International Court of Justice and Self-Defence in International Law" usefully draws together the jurisprudence of the International Court of Justice on the international law governing self-defence. The work could not be more timely in light of both contemporary State practice and the Court's recent controversial judgements on the topic. Of particular note is his analysis of the very complex, and as yet unsettled, notion of "armed attack."Professor Michael Schmitt, Chairman of the American Society of International Law's Lieber Society Book Prize Committee, Chair of Public International Law, Durham UniversityWinner of the University of Reading Faculty of Social Sciences outputs prize for the best research output in 2010.

International Law and the Use of Force

Author: Christine D. Gray

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 0199239142

Category: Law

Page: 455

View: 2096

This fully revised and updated second edition of International Law and the Use of Force explores the whole of the large and controversial subject of the use of force in international law- not only the use of force by states but also the role of the UN in peacekeeping and enforcement action, and the growing importance of regional organizations in the maintenance of international peace and security.

The Inherent Right of Self-Defence in International Law

Author: Murray Colin Alder

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400748507

Category: Law

Page: 222

View: 3442

Determining the earliest point in time at which international law authorises a state to exercise its inherent right of self-defence is an issue which has been debated, but unsatisfactorily reasoned, by scholars and states since the 1960’s. Yet it remains arguably the most pressing question of law that faces the international community. This book unravels the legal and factual complications which have obscured the answer to this question. In contrast to most other works, it takes an historic approach by tracing the evolution of the rights, rules and principles of international law which have governed the use of force by states since the 16th century. Its emphasis on self-defence provides the reader with a new and complete understanding of how and why the international legal framework limits defensive force to repelling an imminent threat or use of offensive force which is directed at the territory of a state. Taking an historic approach enables this book to resurrect an understanding of the human defensive instinct which has guided the formation of the international law of self-defence. It also explains the true legal nature and scope of the inherent right of self-defence, of anticipatory self-defence and provides a definition of the legal commencement of an armed attack for the purpose of Article 51 of the Charter. Finally, the reader will receive a unique source of research materials and analysis of state practice and of scholarly works concerning self-defence and the use of force since the 16th century, which is suitable for all readers of international law around the world.

War, Aggression and Self-Defence

Author: Yoram Dinstein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107191149

Category: Law

Page: 450

View: 7961

Yoram Dinstein's influential War, Aggression and Self-Defence is an indispensable guide to the international legal issues of war and peace.

War and Self-Defense

Author: David Rodin

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199257744

Category: History

Page: 213

View: 8702

When is it right to go to war? The most persuasive answer to this question has always been 'in self-defence'. David Rodin shows what's wrong with this answer. He proposes a comprehensive new theory of the right of self-defence which resolves many of the perplexing questions that have dogged both jurists and philosophers.

The Oxford Handbook of the Use of Force in International Law

Author: Marc Weller

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191653918

Category: Law

Page: 1328

View: 8742

The prohibition of the use of force in international law is one of the major achievements of international law in the past century. The attempt to outlaw war as a means of national policy and to establish a system of collective security after both World Wars resulted in the creation of the United Nations Charter, which remains a principal point of reference for the law on the use of force to this day. There have, however, been considerable challenges to the law on the prohibition of the use of force over the past two decades. This Oxford Handbook is a comprehensive and authoritative study of the modern law on the use of force. Over seventy experts in the field offer a detailed analysis, and to an extent a restatement, of the law in this area. The Handbook reviews the status of the law on the use of force, and assesses what changes, if any, have occurred in consequence to recent developments. It offers cutting-edge and up-to-date scholarship on all major aspects of the prohibition of the use of force. The work is set in context by an extensive introductory section, reviewing the history of the subject, recent challenges, and addressing major conceptual approaches. Its second part addresses collective security, in particular the law and practice of the United Nations organs, and of regional organizations and arrangements. It then considers the substance of the prohibition of the use of force, and of the right to self-defence and associated doctrines. The next section is devoted to armed action undertaken on behalf of peoples and populations. This includes self-determination conflicts, resistance to armed occupation, and forcible humanitarian and pro-democratic action. The possibility of the revival of classical, expansive justifications for the use of force is then addressed. This is matched by a final section considering new security challenges and the emerging law in relation to them. Finally, the key arguments developed in the book are tied together in a substantive conclusion. The Handbook will be essential reading for scholars and students of international law and the use of force, and legal advisers to both government and NGOs.

International Law and New Wars

Author: Christine Chinkin,Mary Kaldor

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316764532

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 6112

International Law and New Wars examines how international law fails to address the contemporary experience of what are known as 'new wars' - instances of armed conflict and violence in places such as Syria, Ukraine, Libya, Mali, the Democratic Republic of Congo and South Sudan. International law, largely constructed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, rests to a great extent on the outmoded concept of war drawn from European experience - inter-state clashes involving battles between regular and identifiable armed forces. The book shows how different approaches are associated with different interpretations of international law, and, in some cases, this has dangerously weakened the legal restraints on war established after 1945. It puts forward a practical case for what it defines as second generation human security and the implications this carries for international law.

Necessity in International Law

Author: Jens David Ohlin,Larry May

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190622954

Category: Law

Page: 216

View: 9470

Necessity is a notoriously dangerous and slippery concept-dangerous because it contemplates virtually unrestrained killing in warfare and slippery when used in conflicting ways in different areas of international law. Jens David Ohlin and Larry May untangle these confusing strands and perform a descriptive mapping of the ways that necessity operates in legal and philosophical arguments in jus ad bellum, jus in bello, human rights, and criminal law. Although the term "necessity" is ever-present in discussions regarding the law and ethics of killing, its meaning changes subtly depending on the context. It is sometimes an exception, at other times a constraint on government action, and most frequently a broad license in war that countenances the wholesale killing of enemy soldiers in battle. Is this legal status quo in war morally acceptable? Ohlin and May offer a normative and philosophical critique of international law's prevailing notion of jus in bello necessity and suggest ways that killing in warfare could be made more humane-not just against civilians but soldiers as well. Along the way, the authors apply their analysis to modern asymmetric conflicts with non-state actors and the military techniques most likely to be used against them. Presenting a rich tapestry of arguments from both contemporary and historical Just War theory, Necessity in International Law is the first full-length study of necessity as a legal and philosophical concept in international affairs.

Self-defense in Islamic and International Law

Assessing Al-Qaeda and the Invasion of Iraq

Author: N. Shah

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230611656

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 9766

The book argues that the concept of self-defense in Islamic and International law is compatible. Al-Qaeda's declaration of Jihad does not meet the Islamic legal test. Similarly, the invasion of Iraq does meet the international legal test.

Destroying the Caroline

The Frontier Raid That Reshaped the Right to War

Author: Craig Forcese

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781552214787

Category: Canada

Page: 392

View: 1759

In the middle of night on 29 December 1837, Canadian militia commanded by a Royal Navy officer crossed the Niagara River to the United States and sank the Caroline, a steamboat being used by insurgents tied to the 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada. That incident, and the diplomatic understanding that settled it, have become shorthand in international law for the "inherent right to self-defence" exercised by states in far-off places and in different sorts of war. The Caroline is remembered today when drones kill terrorists and state leaders contemplate responses to threatening adversaries through military action. But it is remembered by chance and not design, and often imperfectly. This book tells the story of the Caroline affair and the colourful characters who populated it. Along the way, it highlights how the Caroline and claims of self-defence have been used -- and misused -- in response to modern challenges in international relations. It is the history of how a forgotten conflict on an unruly frontier has redefined the right to war.

'Armed Attack' and Article 51 of the UN Charter

Evolutions in Customary Law and Practice

Author: Tom Ruys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 113949483X

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 4502

This book examines to what extent the right of self-defence, as laid down in Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, permits States to launch military operations against other States. In particular, it focuses on the occurrence of an 'armed attack' - the crucial trigger for the activation of this right. In light of the developments since 9/11, the author analyses relevant physical and verbal customary practice, ranging from the 1974 Definition of Aggression to recent incidents such as the 2001 US intervention in Afghanistan and the 2006 Israeli intervention in Lebanon. The notion of 'armed attack' is examined from a threefold perspective. What acts can be regarded as an 'armed attack'? When can an 'armed attack' be considered to take place? And from whom must an 'armed attack' emanate? By way of conclusion, the different findings are brought together in a draft 'Definition of Armed Attack'.

Governing the Use-of-Force in International Relations

The Post 9/11 US Challenge on International Law

Author: A. Warren,I. Bode

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN: 9781137411433

Category: Political Science

Page: 234

View: 7746

This book examines US recourse to military force in the post-9/11 era. In particular, it evaluates the extent to which the Bush and Obama administrations viewed legitimizing the greater use-of-force as a necessary solution to thwart the security threat presented by global terrorist networks and WMD proliferation.

The Six-Day War and Israeli Self-Defense

Questioning the Legal Basis for Preventive War

Author: John Quigley

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107032067

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 8569

The war of June 1967 between Israel and Arab states was widely perceived as being forced on Israel to prevent the annihilation of its people by Arab armies hovering on its borders. Documents now declassified by key governments question this view. The UK, USSR, France and the USA all knew that the Arab states were not in attack mode and tried to dissuade Israel from attacking. In later years, this war was held up as a precedent allowing an attack on a state that is expected to attack. It has even been used to justify a pre-emptive assault on a state expected to attack well in the future. Given the lack of evidence that it was waged by Israel in anticipation of an attack by Arab states, the 1967 war can no longer serve as such a precedent. This book seeks to provide a corrective on the June 1967 war.

The Use of Force and International Law

Author: Christian Henderson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1108643418

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 5643

The Use of Force and International Law offers an authoritative overview of international law governing the resort to force. Looking through the prism of the contemporary challenges that this area of international law faces, including technology, sovereignty, actors, compliance and enforcement, this book addresses key aspects of international law in this area: the general breadth and scope of the prohibition of force, what is meant by 'force', the use of force through the UN and regional organisations, the use of force in peacekeeping operations, the right of self-defence and the customary limitations upon this right, forcible intervention in civil conflicts, the controversial doctrine of humanitarian intervention. Suitable for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics and practitioners, The Use of Force and International Law offers a contemporary, comprehensive and accessible treatment of the subject.