Sartre and No Child Left Behind

An Existential Psychoanalytic Anthropology of Urban Schooling

Author: Darian M. Parker

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0739191608

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 6564

Sartre and No Child Left Behind provides a rich ethnographic account of students’ psychological and emotional experiences of impoverished school settings, a much-ignored dimension of urban schooling. Darian Parker engages with a new anthropological theory of human consciousness to explore these students’ experiences.

Pedagogies in the Flesh

Case Studies on the Embodiment of Sociocultural Differences in Education

Author: Sarah Travis,Amelia M. Kraehe,Emily J. Hood,Tyson E. Lewis

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319595997

Category: Education

Page: 220

View: 6392

This book presents a collection of vivid, theoretically informed descriptions of flashpoints––educational moments when the implicit sociocultural knowledge carried in the body becomes a salient feature of experience. The flashpoints will ignite critical reflection and dialogue about the formation of the self, identity, and social inequality on the level of the preconscious body.

Being and Time

A Translation of Sein und Zeit

Author: Martin Heidegger

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791426777

Category: Philosophy

Page: 487

View: 5047

A new, definitive translation of Heidegger's most important work.

The Second Sex (Vintage Feminism Short Edition)

Author: Simone de Beauvoir

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1473521912

Category: Social Science

Page: 144

View: 7539

Vintage Feminism: classic feminist texts in short form WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY NATALIE HAYNES When this book was first published in 1949 it was to outrage and scandal. Never before had the case for female liberty been so forcefully and successfully argued. De Beauvoir’s belief that ‘One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman’ switched on light bulbs in the heads of a generation of women and began a fight for greater equality and economic independence. These pages contain the key passages of the book that changed perceptions of women forever. TRANSLATED BY CONSTANCE BORDE AND SHEILA MALOVANY-CHEVALLIER ANNOTATED AND INTRODUCED BY MARTINE REID

Debating Humanity

Towards a Philosophical Sociology

Author: Daniel Chernilo

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107129338

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 4446

Debating Humanity explores sociological and philosophical efforts to delineate key features of humanity that identify us as members of the human species. After challenging the normative contradictions of contemporary posthumanism, this book goes back to the foundational debate on humanism between Jean-Paul Sartre and Martin Heidegger in the 1940s and then re-assesses the implicit and explicit anthropological arguments put forward by seven leading postwar theorists: self-transcendence (Hannah Arendt), adaptation (Talcott Parsons), responsibility (Hans Jonas), language (Jrgen Habermas), strong evaluations (Charles Taylor), reflexivity (Margaret Archer) and reproduction of life (Luc Boltanski). Genuinely interdisciplinary and boldly argued, Daniel Chernilo has crafted a novel philosophical sociology that defends a universalistic principle of humanity as vital to any adequate understanding of social life.

Existential Anthropology

Events, Exigencies and Effects

Author: Michael Jackson

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845451226

Category: Social Science

Page: 216

View: 7015

Inspired by existential thought, but using ethnographic methods, Jackson explores a variety of compelling topics, including 9/11, episodes from the war in Sierra Leone and its aftermath, the marginalization of indigenous Australians, the application of new technologies, mundane forms of ritualization, the magical use of language, the sociality of violence, the prose of suffering, and the discourse of human rights. Throughout this compelling work, Jackson demonstrates that existentialism, far from being a philosophy of individual being, enables us to explore issues of social existence and coexistence in new ways, and to theorise events as the sites of a dynamic interplay between the finite possibilities of the situations in which human beings find themselves and the capacities they yet possess for creating viable forms of social life.

The Stranger

Author: Albert Camus

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307827666

Category: Fiction

Page: 144

View: 6610

Through the story of an ordinary man unwittingly drawn into a senseless murder on an Algerian beach, Camus explored what he termed "the nakedness of man faced with the absurd." First published in 1946; now in a new translation by Matthew Ward.

The Denial of Death

Author: Ernest Becker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 141659034X

Category: Philosophy

Page: 336

View: 6883

Winner of the Pulitzer prize in 1974 and the culmination of a life's work, The Denial of Death is Ernest Becker's brilliant and impassioned answer to the "why" of human existence. In bold contrast to the predominant Freudian school of thought, Becker tackles the problem of the vital lie -- man's refusal to acknowledge his own mortality. In doing so, he sheds new light on the nature of humanity and issues a call to life and its living that still resonates more than twenty years after its writing.

A Companion to Psychological Anthropology

Modernity and Psychocultural Change

Author: Conerly Casey,Robert B. Edgerton

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470997222

Category: Social Science

Page: 552

View: 4156

This Companion provides the first definitive overview of psychocultural anthropology: a subject that focuses on cultural, psychological, and social interrelations across cultures. Brings together original essays by leading scholars in the field Offers an in-depth exploration of the concepts and topics that have emerged through contemporary ethnographic work and the processes of global change Key issues range from studies of consciousness and time, emotion, cognition, dreaming, and memory, to the lingering effects of racism and ethnocentrism, violence, identity and subjectivity

Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus

Introduction to Schizoanalysis

Author: Eugene W. Holland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134829469

Category: Psychology

Page: 176

View: 7152

Eugene W. Holland provides an excellent introduction to Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's Anti-Oedipus which is widely recognized as one of the most influential texts in philosophy to have appeared in the last thirty years. He lucidly presents the theoretical concerns behind Anti-Oedipus and explores with clarity the diverse influences of Marx, Freud, Nietzsche and Kant on the development of Deleuze & Guattari's thinking. He also examines the wider implications of their work in revitalizing Marxism, environmentalism, feminism and cultural studies.

The Anatomy of Disgust

Author: William Ian MILLER,William Ian Miller

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674041062

Category: Psychology

Page: 336

View: 805

William Miller details our anxious relation to basic life processes; eating, excreting, fornicating, decaying, and dying. But disgust pushes beyond the flesh to vivify the larger social order with the idiom it commandeers from the sights, smells, tastes, feels, and sounds of fleshly physicality. Disgust and contempt, Miller argues, play crucial political roles in creating and maintaining social hierarchy. Democracy depends less on respect for persons than on an equal distribution of contempt. Disgust, however, signals dangerous division.

Mimesis and Theory

Essays on Literature and Criticism, 1953-2005

Author: René Girard,Robert Doran

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 0804755809

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 310

View: 5320

Mimesis and Theory brings together twenty previously uncollected essays on literature and literary theory by one of the most important thinkers of the past thirty years.

The Social Construction of Reality

A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge

Author: Peter L. Berger,Thomas Luckmann

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN: 1453215468

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 7782

The classic work that redefined the sociology of knowledge and has inspired a generation of philosophers and thinkers In this seminal book, Peter L. Berger and Thomas Luckmann examine how knowledge forms and how it is preserved and altered within a society. Unlike earlier theorists and philosophers, Berger and Luckmann go beyond intellectual history and focus on commonsense, everyday knowledge—the proverbs, morals, values, and beliefs shared among ordinary people. When first published in 1966, this systematic, theoretical treatise introduced the term social construction,effectively creating a new thought and transforming Western philosophy.

The Wherewithal of Life

Ethics, Migration, and the Question of Well-Being

Author: Michael Jackson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520956818

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 1304

The Wherewithal of Life engages with current developments in the anthropology of ethics and migration studies to explore in empirical depth and detail the life experiences of three young men – a Ugandan migrant in Copenhagen, a Burkina Faso migrant in Amsterdam, and a Mexican migrant in Boston – in ways that significantly broaden our understanding of the existential situations and ethical dilemmas of those migrating from the global south. Michael Jackson offers the first biographically based phenomenological account of migration and mobility, providing new insights into the various motives, tactics, dilemmas, dreams, and disappointments that characterize contemporary migration. It is argued that the quandaries of African or Mexican migrants are not unique to people moving between ‘traditional’ and ‘modern’ worlds. While more intensely felt by the young, seeking to find a way out of a world of limited opportunity and circumscribed values, the experiences of transition are familiar to us all, whatever our age, gender, ethnicity or social status – namely, the impossibility of calculating what one may lose in leaving a settled life or home place; what one may gain by risking oneself in an alien environment; the difficulty of striking a balance between personal fulfillment and the moral claims of kinship; and the struggle to know the difference between ‘concrete’ and ‘abstract’ utopias (the first reasonable and worth pursuing; the second hopelessly unattainable).

She Came to Stay

Author: Simone de Beauvoir

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9780393318845

Category: Fiction

Page: 404

View: 8496

Set in Paris on the eve of World War II and sizzling with love, anger, and revenge, She Came to Stay explores the changes wrought in the soul of a woman and a city soon to fall. Although Françoise considers her relationship with Pierre an open one, she falls prey to jealousy when the gamine Xavière catches his attention. The moody young woman from the countryside pries her way between Françoise and Pierre, playing up to each one and deviously pulling them apart, until the only way out of the triangle is destruction. "Behind the sympathy there is curiosity. . . . A writer whose tears for her characters freeze as they drop." -- Sunday London Times

I and Thou

Author: Martin Buber

Publisher: eBookIt.com

ISBN: 1456609912

Category: Philosophy

Page: 182

View: 5444

Martin Buber's I AND THOU has long been acclaimed as a classic. Many prominent philosophers, religious thinkers and writers have acknowledged its influence on their works. Students of intellectual history consider it a landmark; and the generation born since WWII considers Buber as one of its prophets.

The Eyes of the Skin

Architecture and the Senses

Author: Juhani Pallasmaa

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1119941288

Category: Architecture

Page: 128

View: 2148

First published in 1996, The Eyes of the Skin has become a classic of architectural theory. For every new intake of students studying Pallasmaa's classic text, The Eyes of the Skin provides a totally fresh understanding of architecture and a new set of insights.

The Desire for Mutual Recognition

Social Movements and the Dissolution of the False Self

Author: Peter Gabel

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351602098

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 4145

The Desire for Mutual Recognition is a work of accessible social theory that seeks to make visible the desire for authentic social connection, emanating from our social nature, that animates all human relationships. Using a social-phenomenological method that illuminates rather than explains social life, Peter Gabel shows how the legacy of social alienation that we have inherited from prior generations envelops us in a milieu of a "fear of the other," a fear of each other. Yet because social reality is always co-constituted by the desire for authentic connection and genuine co-presence, social transformation always remains possible, and liberatory social movements are always emerging and providing us with a permanent source of hope. The great progressive social movements for workers' rights, civil rights, and women’s and gay liberation, generated their transformative power from their capacity to transcend the reciprocal isolation that otherwise separates us. These movements at their best actually realize our fundamental longing for mutual recognition, and for that very reason they can generate immense social change and bend the moral arc of the universe toward justice. Gabel examines the struggle between desire and alienation as it unfolds across our social world, calling for a new social-spiritual activism that can go beyond the limitations of existing progressive theory and action, intentionally foster and sustain our capacity to heal what separates us, and inspire a new kind of social movement that can transform the world.