Revolution

A History of England

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 0230706428

Category:

Page: 352

View: 2727

Revolution, the fourth volume of Peter Ackroyd's enthralling History of England begins in 1688 with a revolution and ends in 1815 with a famous victory. In it, Ackroyd takes readers from William of Orange's accession following the Glorious Revolution to the Regency, when the flamboyant Prince of Wales ruled in the stead of his mad father, George III, and England was - again - at war with France, a war that would end with the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo.Late Stuart and Georgian England marked the creation of the great pillars of the English state. The Bank of England was founded, as was the stock exchange, the Church of England was fully established as the guardian of the spiritual life of the nation and parliament became the sovereign body of the nation with responsibilities and duties far beyond those of the monarch. It was a revolutionary era in English letters, too, a time in which newspapers first flourished and the English novel was born. It was an era in which coffee houses and playhouses boomed, gin flowed freely and in which shops, as we know them today, began to proliferate in our towns and villages. But it was also a time of extraordinary and unprecedented technological innovation, which saw England utterly and irrevocably transformed from a country of blue skies and farmland to one of soot and steel and coal.

Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466855991

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 7673

Peter Ackroyd has been praised as one of the greatest living chroniclers of Britain and its people. In Rebellion, he continues his dazzling account of the history of England, beginning with the progress south of the Scottish king, James VI, who on the death of Elizabeth I became the first Stuart king of England, and ending with the deposition and flight into exile of his grandson, James II. The Stuart monarchy brought together the two nations of England and Scotland into one realm, albeit a realm still marked by political divisions that echo to this day. More importantly, perhaps, the Stuart era was marked by the cruel depredations of civil war, and the killing of a king. Shrewd and opinionated, James I was eloquent on matters as diverse as theology, witchcraft, and the abuses of tobacco, but his attitude to the English parliament sowed the seeds of the division that would split the country during the reign of his hapless heir, Charles I. Ackroyd offers a brilliant, warts-and-all portrayal of Charles's nemesis, Oliver Cromwell, Parliament's great military leader and England's only dictator, who began his career as a political liberator but ended it as much of a despot as "that man of blood," the king he executed. England's turbulent seventeenth century is vividly laid out before us, but so too is the cultural and social life of the period, notable for its extraordinarily rich literature, including Shakespeare's late masterpieces, Jacobean tragedy, the poetry of John Donne and Milton and Thomas Hobbes's great philosophical treatise, Leviathan. In addition to its account of England's royalty, Rebellion also gives us a very real sense of the lives of ordinary English men and women, lived out against a backdrop of constant disruption and uncertainty.

Revolution

The History of England from the Battle of the Boyne to the Battle of Waterloo

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books

ISBN: 1466880163

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 6743

The fourth volume of Peter Ackroyd's enthralling History of England, beginning in 1688 with a revolution and ending in 1815 with a famous victory. In Revolution, Peter Ackroyd takes readers from William of Orange's accession following the Glorious Revolution to the Regency, when the flamboyant Prince of Wales ruled in the stead of his mad father, George III, and England was—again—at war with France, a war that would end with the defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo. Late Stuart and Georgian England marked the creation of the great pillars of the English state. The Bank of England was founded, as was the stock exchange; the Church of England was fully established as the guardian of the spiritual life of the nation, and parliament became the sovereign body of the nation with responsibilities and duties far beyond those of the monarch. It was a revolutionary era in English letters, too, a time in which newspapers first flourished and the English novel was born. It was an era in which coffee houses and playhouses boomed, gin flowed freely, and in which shops, as we know them today, began to proliferate in towns and villages. But it was also a time of extraordinary and unprecedented technological innovation, which saw England utterly and irrevocably transformed from a country of blue skies and farmland to one of soot and steel and coal. Ackroyd is the author of the first, second, and third volumes of his history of England, Foundation, Tudors, and Rebellion.

Dominion

The History of England from the Battle of Waterloo to Victoria's Diamond Jubilee

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books

ISBN: 1250135532

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5121

"Ackroyd, as always, is well worth the read." —Kirkus, starred review The fifth volume of Peter Ackroyd's enthralling History of England Dominion, the fifth volume of Peter Ackroyd’s masterful History of England, begins in 1815 as national glory following the Battle of Waterloo gives way to a post-war depression and ends with the death of Queen Victoria in January 1901. Spanning the end of the Regency, Ackroyd takes readers from the accession of the profligate George IV whose government was steered by Lord Liverpool, whose face was set against reform, to the ‘Sailor King’ William IV whose reign saw the modernization of the political system and the abolition of slavery. But it was the accession of Queen Victoria, at only eighteen years old, that sparked an era of enormous innovation. Technological progress—from steam railways to the first telegram—swept the nation and the finest inventions were showcased at the first Great Exhibition in 1851. The emergence of the middle-classes changed the shape of society and scientific advances changed the old pieties of the Church of England, and spread secular ideas among the population. Though intense industrialization brought booming times for the factory owners, the working classes were still subjected to poor housing, long work hours, and dire poverty. Yet by the end of Victoria’s reign, the British Empire dominated much of the globe, and Britannia really did seem to rule the waves.

A History of Women in the West: From ancient goddesses to Christian saints

Author: Georges Duby,Pauline Schmitt Pantel,Michelle Perrot

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674403697

Category: History

Page: 572

View: 9115

Informed by the work of 75 distinguished historians, this five-volume series sets before us an engaging, panoramic chronicle that extends from antiquity to the present day. Volume One offers fresh insight into more than 20 centuries of Greek and Roman history to illustrate how representations of women evolved during this age. 84 illustrations.

Foundation

The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1250013674

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 7160

The first book in Peter Ackroyd's history of England series, which has since been followed up with two more installments, Tudors and Rebellion. In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French. With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers.

The Face of Britain

A History of the Nation Through Its Portraits

Author: Simon Schama

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190621885

Category: Art

Page: 608

View: 2028

Author of a number of celebrated works, including the bestselling The Story of the Jews and Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution, Simon Schama's latest book fuses history and art to create a tour de force of narrative sweep and illuminating insight. Using images from works-paintings, photographs, lithographs, etchings, sketches-found in London's National Portrait Gallery, The Face of Britain weaves together an account of their composition, framed by their particular moment of creation, and in the process unveils a collective portrait of nation and its history. "Portraits," Schama writes, "have always been made with an eye to posterity." Commissioned to paint Winston Churchill in 1954 Graham Sutherland struggled with how to capture the "savior" of Great Britain honestly and humanely. Schama calls the portrait, initially damned, the "most powerful image of a Great Briton ever executed." Annie Leibovitz's photograph of a nude John Lennon kissing Yoko Ono, taken five hours before his murder, bears "a weight of poignancy she could not possibly have anticipated." Hans Holbein's preparatory sketch for a portrait of Henry VIII depicts "an unstoppable engine of dynastic generation." Here are expressions from across the centuries of normalcy and heroism, beauty and disfigurement, aristocracy and deprivation, the familiar and the obscure-the faces of courtesans, warriors, workers, activists, playwrights, the high and mighty as well as pub-crawlers. Linking them is Schama's vibrant exploration of how their connective power emerges from the dynamic between subject and artist, work and viewer, time and place. Schama's compelling analysis and impassioned evocation of these works create an unforgettable verbal mosaic that at once reveals and transforms the images he places before us. Lavishly illustrated and written with the storytelling brio that is Schama's trademark, The Face of Britain invites us to look at a nation's visual legacies and find its reflection.

A History of the English-Speaking Peoples Volume I

The Birth of Britain

Author: Sir Winston S. Churchill

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1472585240

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 2251

In the first volume of his majestic history of the English-speaking peoples, Sir Winston S. Churchill chronicles the birth of Britain from the earliest inhabitants of the British Isles to the Battle of Bosworth.

Dominion

A History of England

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780230706439

Category:

Page: 416

View: 6020

The penultimate volume of Peter Ackroyd's masterful History of England series, Dominion begins in 1815 as national glory following the Battle of Waterloo gives way to post-war depression, spanning the last years of the Regency to the death of Queen Victoria in January 1901.In it, Ackroyd takes us from the accession of the profligate George IV whose government was steered by Lord Liverpool, who was firmly set against reform, to the reign of his brother, William IV, the 'Sailor King', whose reign saw the modernization of the political system and the abolition of slavery. But it was the accession of Queen Victoria, aged only eighteen, that sparked an era of enormous innovation. Technological progress - from steam railways to the first telegram - swept the nation and the finest inventions were showcased at the first Great Exhibition in 1851. The emergence of the middle classes changed the shape of society and scientific advances changed the old pieties of the Church of England, and spread secular ideas across the nation. But though intense industrialization brought boom times for the factory owners, the working classes were still subjected to poor housing, long working hours and dire poverty.It was a time that saw a flowering of great literature, too. As the Georgian era gave way to that of Victoria, readers could delight not only in the work of Byron, Shelley and Wordsworth but also the great nineteenth-century novelists: the Brontë sisters, George Eliot, Mrs Gaskell, Thackeray, and, of course, Dickens, whose work has become synonymous with Victorian England.Nor was Victorian expansionism confined to Britain alone. By the end of Victoria's reign, the Queen was also an Empress and the British Empire dominated much of the globe. And, as Ackroyd shows in this richly populated, vividly told account, Britannia really did seem to rule the waves.

The Founding of a Nation

A History of the American Revolution, 1763-1776

Author: Merrill Jensen

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872207059

Category: History

Page: 735

View: 4182

A reprint of the 1968 Oxford University Press edition.

Tudors

Author: Peter Ackroyd

Publisher: Pan MacMillan

ISBN: 9780230764071

Category: Great Britain

Page: 507

View: 4291

Rich in detail and atmosphere and told in vivid prose, 'Tudors' recounts the transformation of England from a settled Catholic country to a Protestant superpower. It is the story of Henry VIII's cataclysmic break with Rome, and his relentless pursuit of both the perfect wife and the perfect heir.

The History of Sexuality

An Introduction

Author: Michel Foucault

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 0307819280

Category: Philosophy

Page: 176

View: 6985

Michel Foucult offers an iconoclastic exploration of why we feel compelled to continually analyze and discuss sex, and of the social and mental mechanisms of power that cause us to direct the questions of what we are to what our sexuality is.

A Biographical History of England

From Egbert the Great to the Revolution: Consisting of Characters Disposed in Different Classes, and Adapted to a Methodical Catalogue of Engraved British Heads: Intended as an Essay Towards Reducing Our Biography to System, and a Help to the Knowledge of Portraits: Interspersed with a Variety of Anecdotes, and Memoirs of a Great Number of Persons ... With a Preface ...

Author: James Granger

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Great Britain

Page: N.A

View: 2634

A People's History of England

Author: A. L. Morton

Publisher: Obscure Press

ISBN: 1443738948

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 5196

A complete social and political history of England. Originally published in 1938. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Obscure Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.Contents Include Tribes and Legions The Growth of Feudalism Feudal England, The Decline of Feudalism The End of the Middle Ages The New Monarchy and the Bourgeoisie Origin of the English Revolution The English Revolution Commonwealth and Compromise Whig England The Industrial Revolution The Triumph of Industrial Capitalism Liberal Ascendancy The Organisation of the Working Class Colonial Expansion Origins of the World War World War World Crisis Note about Books Index.

The French Revolution

A History ...

Author: Thomas Carlyle

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: France

Page: N.A

View: 697

The Agrarian History of England and Wales:

Author: H. E. Hallam,Joan Thirsk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521200738

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1128

View: 6612

This 1988 volume deals with the agrarian history of England and Wales from the beginning of the reign of Edward the Confessor to the outbreak of the Black Death in 1348. It divides the counties into regions and deals with each under the headings of new settlements, agriculture and pastoralism (crops and stock), yield ratios and techniques (including field systems, crop nutrition and drainage). There are also sections on the Late Saxon period, Domesday England, wages and prices, vernacular architecture, and the life of the people. The volume as a whole offers a detailed description of trends, both economic and social, between 1042 and 1350 and of the complexities of an economy and society split into many and various sub-economies and sub-societies, all very different from one another but closely knit and interdependent.