Reformation and the Culture of Persuasion

Author: Andrew Pettegree

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 612

A groundbreaking new history of the process of religious conversion during the European Reformation.

Persuasion and Conversion

Essays on Religion, Politics, and the Public Sphere in Early Modern England

Author: W.J.T. Kirby

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 587

A popular ‘culture of persuasion’ fostered by the Reformation promoted a displacement of late-medieval ‘sacramental culture’ through argument, textual interpretation, exhortation, reasoned opinion, and moral advice in both pulpit and press. This collection of essays addresses the dynamic interaction of religion and politics in the emerging ‘public sphere'.

Brand Luther

How an Unheralded Monk Turned His Small Town into a Center of Publishing, Made Himself the Most Famous Man in Europe--and Started the Protestant Reformation

Author: Andrew Pettegree

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 557

A revolutionary look at Martin Luther, the Reformation, and the birth of publishing, on the eve of the Reformation’s 500th anniversary When Martin Luther posted his “theses” on the door of the Wittenberg church in 1517, protesting corrupt practices, he was virtually unknown. Within months, his ideas spread across Germany, then all of Europe; within years, their author was not just famous, but infamous, responsible for catalyzing the violent wave of religious reform that would come to be known as the Protestant Reformation and engulfing Europe in decades of bloody war. Luther came of age with the printing press, and the path to glory of neither one was obvious to the casual observer of the time. Printing was, and is, a risky business—the questions were how to know how much to print and how to get there before the competition. Pettegree illustrates Luther's great gifts not simply as a theologian, but as a communicator, indeed, as the world's first mass-media figure, its first brand. He recognized in printing the power of pamphlets, written in the colloquial German of everyday people, to win the battle of ideas. But that wasn't enough—not just words, but the medium itself was the message. Fatefully, Luther had a partner in the form of artist and businessman Lucas Cranach, who together with Wittenberg’s printers created the distinctive look of Luther's pamphlets. Together, Luther and Cranach created a product that spread like wildfire—it was both incredibly successful and widely imitated. Soon Germany was overwhelmed by a blizzard of pamphlets, with Wittenberg at its heart; the Reformation itself would blaze on for more than a hundred years. Publishing in advance of the Reformation’s 500th anniversary, Brand Luther fuses the history of religion, of printing, and of capitalism—the literal marketplace of ideas—into one enthralling story, revolutionizing our understanding of one of the pivotal figures and eras in human history. From the Hardcover edition.

Contesting the Reformation

Author: C. Scott Dixon

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 677

Contesting the Reformation provides a comprehensive surveyof the most influential works in the field of Reformation studiesfrom a comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinaryperspective. Represents the only English-language single-authored syntheticstudy of Reformation historiography Addresses both the English and the Continental debates onReformation history Provides a thematic approach which takes in the main trends inmodern Reformation history Draws on the most recent publications relating to Reformationstudies Considers the social, political, cultural, and intellectualimplications of the Reformation and the associated literature

Illustrated Religious Texts in the North of Europe, 1500-1800

Author: Prof Dr Els Stronks

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 278

View: 550

Illustrated Religious Texts in the North of Europe, 1500-1800 provides a new perspective on the role of visual imagery in the Reformation period by focusing on international forms of collaboration, and makes a significant contribution to ongoing debates concerning the history of the book by focusing on the ideological as well as practical side of international contacts.

The Negotiated Reformation

Imperial Cities and the Politics of Urban Reform, 1525-1550

Author: Christopher W. Close

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 298

This book offers a new explanation for the spread of urban reform during the sixteenth century, arguing that systems of communication between cities proved crucial for the Reformation's development. This hypothesis explains not only how the Reformation spread to almost every imperial city in southern Germany, but also how it survived attempts to repress religious reform.

Church Music and Protestantism in Post-Reformation England

Discourses, Sites and Identities

Author: Dr Jonathan Willis

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 778

'Church Music and Protestantism in Post-Reformation England' breaks new ground in the religious history of Elizabethan England, through a closely focused study of the relationship between the practice of religious music and the complex process of Protestant identity formation. Hearing was of vital importance in the early modern period, and music was one of the most prominent, powerful and emotive elements of religious worship. But in large part, traditional historical narratives of the English Reformation have been distinctly tone deaf. Recent scholarship has begun to take increasing notice of some elements of Reformed musical practice, such as the congregational singing of psalms in meter. This book marks a significant advance in that area, combining an understanding of theory as expressed in contemporary religious and musical discourse, with a detailed study of the practice of church music in key sites of religious worship. Divided into three sections - 'Discourses', 'Sites', and 'Identities' - the book begins with an exploration of the classical and religious discourses which underpinned sixteenth-century understandings of music, and its use in religious worship. It then moves on to an investigation of the actual practice of church music in parish and cathedral churches, before shifting its attention to the people of Elizabethan England, and the ways in which music both served and shaped the difficult process of Protestantisation. Through an exploration of these issues, and by reintegrating music back into the Elizabethan church, we gain an expanded and enriched understanding of the complex evolution of religious identities, and of what it actually meant to be Protestant in post-Reformation England.

Politics and the Paul's Cross Sermons, 1558-1642

Author: Mary Morrissey

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 257

View: 376

Throughout the Reformation period, England's most important public pulpit was Paul's Cross, which stood in the churchyard of St Paul's Cathedral in London. This book offers a detailed history of the Paul's Cross sermons from the reign of Elizabeth I until the destruction of the pulpit under Charles I. It explains the arrangement for the sermons' delivery and the tensions between the different authorities (the royal government, the bishops of London, and theCorporation of London) who controlled them. The increasing role that the Paul's Cross sermons played in London's civic culture after the Reformation is discussed, and an account is given of the narrowing of the sermons' audience in the years preceding the English Civil War. This book explores early modernEnglish homiletics, so that preachers' adaptation of sermon genres to suit sermons on religious controversies or on political anniversaries (such as 5 November) can be described.

Public Opinion and Changing Identities in the Early Modern Netherlands

Essays in Honour of Alastair Duke

Author: Judith Pollmann

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 305

View: 866

This lively collection of essays examines the link between public opinion and the development of changing 'Netherlandish' identities in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.