Race & Democracy

The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana, 1915-1972

Author: Adam Fairclough

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820331140

Category: History

Page: 610

View: 3594

From the foundation of the New Orleans branch of the NAACP in 1915 to the beginning of Edwin Edwards' first term as governor in 1972, this is a wide-ranging study of the civil rights struggle in Louisiana. This edition contains a new preface which brings the narrative up-to-date, including coverage of Hurricane Katrina.

Racism in a Racial Democracy

The Maintenance of White Supremacy in Brazil

Author: France Winddance Twine

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813523651

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 350

In Racism in a Racial Democracy, France Winddance Twine asks why Brazilians, particularly Afro-Brazilians, continue to have faith in Brazil's "racial democracy" in the face of pervasive racism in all spheres of Brazilian life. Through a detailed ethnography, Twine provides a cultural analysis of the everyday discursive and material practices that sustain and naturalize white supremacy. This is the first ethnographic study of racism in southeastern Brazil to place the practices of upwardly mobile Afro-Brazilians at the center of analysis. Based on extensive field research and more than fifty life histories with Afro- and Euro-Brazilians, this book analyzes how Brazilians conceptualize and respond to racial disparities. Twine illuminates the obstacles Brazilian activists face when attempting to generate grassroots support for an antiracist movement among the majority of working class Brazilians. Anyone interested in racism and antiracism in Latin America will find this book compelling.

After the War on Crime

Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction

Author: Mary Louise Frampton,Ian Haney Lopez,Jonathan Simon

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814727829

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 8458

Since the 1970s, Americans have witnessed a pyrrhic war on crime, with sobering numbers at once chilling and cautionary. Our imprisoned population has increased five-fold, with a commensurate spike in fiscal costs that many now see as unsupportable into the future. As American society confronts a multitude of new challenges ranging from terrorism to the disappearance of middle-class jobs to global warming, the war on crime may be up for reconsideration for the first time in a generation or more. Relatively low crime rates indicate that the public mood may be swinging toward declaring victory and moving on. However, to declare that the war is over is dangerous and inaccurate, and After the War on Crime reveals that the impact of this war reaches far beyond statistics; simply moving on is impossible. The war has been most devastating to those affected by increased rates and longer terms of incarceration, but its reach has also reshaped a sweeping range of social institutions, including law enforcement, politics, schooling, healthcare, and social welfare. The war has also profoundly altered conceptions of race and community. It is time to consider the tasks reconstruction must tackle. To do so requires first a critical assessment of how this war has remade our society, and then creative thinking about how government, foundations, communities, and activists should respond. After the War on Crime accelerates this reassessment with original essays by a diverse, interdisciplinary group of scholars as well as policy professionals and community activists. The volume's immediate goal is to spark a fresh conversation about the war on crime and its consequences; its long-term aspiration is to develop a clear understanding of how we got here and of where we should go.

Chocolate City

A History of Race and Democracy in the Nation's Capital

Author: Chris Myers Asch,George Derek Musgrove

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469635879

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 8855

Monumental in scope and vividly detailed, Chocolate City tells the tumultuous, four-century story of race and democracy in our nation's capital. Emblematic of the ongoing tensions between America's expansive democratic promises and its enduring racial realities, Washington often has served as a national battleground for contentious issues, including slavery, segregation, civil rights, the drug war, and gentrification. But D.C. is more than just a seat of government, and authors Chris Myers Asch and George Derek Musgrove also highlight the city's rich history of local activism as Washingtonians of all races have struggled to make their voices heard in an undemocratic city where residents lack full political rights. Tracing D.C.'s massive transformations--from a sparsely inhabited plantation society into a diverse metropolis, from a center of the slave trade to the nation's first black-majority city, from "Chocolate City" to "Latte City--Asch and Musgrove offer an engaging narrative peppered with unforgettable characters, a history of deep racial division but also one of hope, resilience, and interracial cooperation.

Democracy in Black

How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul

Author: Eddie S. Glaude (Jr.)

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 0804137412

Category: History

Page: 274

View: 3270

"A polemic on the state of black America that argues that we don't yet live in a post-racial society"--

Days of Hope

Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era

Author: Patricia Sullivan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807864897

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 7751

In the 1930s and 1940s, a loose alliance of blacks and whites, individuals and organizations, came together to offer a radical alternative to southern conservative politics. In Days of Hope, Patricia Sullivan traces the rise and fall of this movement. Using oral interviews with participants in this movement as well as documentary sources, she demonstrates that the New Deal era inspired a coalition of liberals, black activists, labor organizers, and Communist Party workers who sought to secure the New Deal's social and economic reforms by broadening the base of political participation in the South. From its origins in a nationwide campaign to abolish the poll tax, the initiative to expand democracy in the South developed into a regional drive to register voters and elect liberals to Congress. The NAACP, the CIO Political Action Committee, and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare coordinated this effort, which combined local activism with national strategic planning. Although it dramatically increased black voter registration and led to some electoral successes, the movement ultimately faltered, according to Sullivan, because the anti-Communist fervor of the Cold War and a militant backlash from segregationists fractured the coalition and marginalized southern radicals. Nevertheless, the story of this campaign invites a fuller consideration of the possibilities and constraints that have shaped the struggle for racial democracy in America since the 1930s.

The Spectre of Race

How Discrimination Haunts Western Democracy

Author: Michael G. Hanchard

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140088957X

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 475

How racism and discrimination have been central to democracies from the classical period to today As right-wing nationalism and authoritarian populism gain momentum across the world, liberals, and even some conservatives, worry that democratic principles are under threat. In The Spectre of Race, Michael Hanchard argues that the current rise in xenophobia and racist rhetoric is nothing new and that exclusionary policies have always been central to democratic practices since their beginnings in classical times. Contending that democracy has never been for all people, Hanchard discusses how marginalization is reinforced in modern politics, and why these contradictions need to be fully examined if the dynamics of democracy are to be truly understood. Hanchard identifies continuities of discriminatory citizenship from classical Athens to the present and looks at how democratic institutions have promoted undemocratic ideas and practices. The longest-standing modern democracies--France, Britain, and the United States—profited from slave labor, empire, and colonialism, much like their Athenian predecessor. Hanchard follows these patterns through the Enlightenment and to the states and political thinkers of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and he examines how early political scientists, including Woodrow Wilson and his contemporaries, devised what Hanchard has characterized as "racial regimes" to maintain the political and economic privileges of dominant groups at the expense of subordinated ones. Exploring how democracies reconcile political inequality and equality, Hanchard debates the thorny question of the conditions under which democracies have created and maintained barriers to political membership. Showing the ways that race, gender, nationality, and other criteria have determined a person's status in political life, The Spectre ofRace offers important historical context for how democracy generates political difference and inequality.

Darwinism, Democracy, and Race

American Anthropology and Evolutionary Biology in the Twentieth Century

Author: John P Jackson

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 1351810782

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3556

Darwinism, Democracy, and Race examines the development and defence of an argument that arose at the boundary between anthropology and evolutionary biology in twentieth-century America. In its fully articulated form, this argument simultaneously discredited scientific racism and defended free human agency in Darwinian terms. The volume is timely because it gives readers a key to assessing contemporary debates about the biology of race. By working across disciplinary lines, the book's focal figures--the anthropologist Franz Boas, the cultural anthropologist Alfred Kroeber, the geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky, and the physical anthropologist Sherwood Washburn--found increasingly persuasive ways of cutting between genetic determinist and social constructionist views of race by grounding Boas's racially egalitarian, culturally relativistic, and democratically pluralistic ethic in a distinctive version of the genetic theory of natural selection. Collaborators in making and defending this argument included Ashley Montagu, Stephen Jay Gould, and Richard Lewontin. Darwinism, Democracy, and Race will appeal to advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and academics interested in subjects including Philosophy, Critical Race Theory, Sociology of Race, History of Biology and Anthropology, and Rhetoric of Science.

Racial Democracy and the Black Metropolis

Housing Policy in Postwar Chicago

Author: Preston H. Smith

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816637024

Category: Political Science

Page: 433

View: 4649

How a black elite fighting racial discrimination reinforced class inequality in postwar America

Herbert Aptheker on Race and Democracy

A Reader

Author: Herbert Aptheker,Eric Foner,Manning Marable

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025203029X

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 8832

Barred from the academy for most of his life because of his political views, Herbert Aptheker (1915-2003) nevertheless forged a path in the field of African American studies decades before the civil rights movement reached fruition. On Race and Democracy collects fourteen of his essays. Written with passion and eloquence, they are full of ideas originally dismissed by a white, segregated academy that have now become part of the scholarly mainstream. Covering topics including the maroons, black abolitionists, Reconstruction, and W. E. B. Du Bois, the essays of On Race and Democracy demonstrate the critical connection between political commitment and the advancement of scholarship, while restoring Aptheker's central place in the development of African American studies.

Rituals of Race

American Public Culture and the Search for Racial Democracy

Author: Alessandra Lorini

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813918716

Category: Political Science

Page: 305

View: 9112

In this sophisticated study of the struggle for African American human rights in America, Alessandra Lorini examines public events in New York City from the end of the Civil War through World War I, demonstrating how ritualized elements of black processions, parades, riots, and festivals made visible the inherent paradox of the "separate but equal" doctrine of the time. By examining these public events, Lorini dramatizes the quest for liberty and equality as a story of living forces, not abstract principles and legal maneuvers. Lorini defines public culture as a conflictual space in which gender, race, and class alliances are made and remade in the ongoing battle for expanded democracy. She then explores how public rituals directly confronted the demeaning representations of blacks prevalent in America's civic and national culture—particularly the idea of black racial inferiority outlined in theories of "racial science." Through rituals, blacks constructed collective memories and identities, which ultimately served as the basis for their assertion of what Lorini calls "participatory democracy," a movement created by ordinary citizens in which activists such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida Wells-Barnett, Mary White Ovington, and Booker T. Washington could attempt to effect social change.

Citizens of Asian America

Democracy and Race during the Cold War

Author: Cindy I-Fen Cheng

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814770088

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4888

Winner, 2013-2014 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, Adult Non-Fiction presented by the Asian Pacific American Librarian Association During the Cold War, Soviet propaganda highlighted U.S. racism in order to undermine the credibility of U.S. democracy. In response, incorporating racial and ethnic minorities in order to affirm that America worked to ensure the rights of all and was superior to communist countries became a national imperative. In Citizens of Asian America , Cindy I-Fen Cheng explores how Asian Americans figured in this effort to shape the credibility of American democracy, even while the perceived “foreignness” of Asian Americans cast them as likely alien subversives whose activities needed monitoring following the communist revolution in China and the outbreak of the Korean War. While histories of international politics and U.S. race relations during the Cold War have largely overlooked the significance of Asian Americans, Cheng challenges the black-white focus of the existing historiography. She highlights how Asian Americans made use of the government’s desire to be leader of the “free world” by advocating for civil rights reforms, such as housing integration, increased professional opportunities, and freedom from political persecution. Further, Cheng examines the liberalization of immigration policies, which worked not only to increase the civil rights of Asian Americans but also to improve the nation’s ties with Asian countries, providing an opportunity for the U.S. government to broadcast, on a global scale, the freedom and opportunity that American society could offer.

Sites of Slavery

Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post–Civil Rights Imagination

Author: Salamishah Tillet

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822352613

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 9216

In Sites of Slavery Salamishah Tillet examines how contemporary African American artists and intellectuals—including Annette Gordon-Reed, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Bill T. Jones, Carrie Mae Weems, and Kara Walker—turn to the subject of slavery in order to understand and challenge the ongoing exclusion of African Americans from the founding narratives of the United States.

Takeover

Race, Education, and American Democracy

Author: Domingo Morel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190678976

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 4799

"State takeovers of local governments have garnered national attention of late, particularly following the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. In most U.S. cities, local governments are responsible for decisions concerning matters such as the local water supply and school affairs. However, once a state takes over, this decision-making capability is shuttled. Despite the widespread attention that takeovers in Flint and Detroit have gained, we know little about how such takeovers -- a policy option that has been in use since the 1980s -- affect political power in local communities. This manuscript offers the first systematic study of state takeovers of local governments by focusing on takeovers of local school districts. The book examines the factors that contribute to state takeovers as well as the effects and political implications of takeovers on racialized communities, the communities most often affected by them. It challenges conventional wisdom that centralization and state takeovers unequivocally disempower racialized communities, laying out the conditions under which the policy will disempower or empower racial and ethnic minority populations. In addition, the book expands our understanding of urban politics. The book argues that state interventions are part of the new normal for cities and offers a novel theoretical framework for understanding the presence of the state in American cities. The book is built around an original study of nearly 1000 school districts, including every school district that has been taken over by their respective state, and a powerful case study of Newark, New Jersey"--

America's Uneven Democracy

Race, Turnout, and Representation in City Politics

Author: Zoltan Hajnal

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521190347

Category: Political Science

Page: 241

View: 1071

This book demonstrates that low and uneven voter turnout leads to disadvantages for racial and ethnic minorities and proposes a practical and cost-effective solution.

How Democracies Die

Author: Steven Levitsky,Daniel Ziblatt

Publisher: Crown

ISBN: 1524762938

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7679

Fateful alliances -- Gatekeeping in America -- The great Republican abdication -- Subverting democracy -- The guardrails of democracy -- The unwritten rules of American politics -- The unraveling -- Trump against the guardrails -- Saving democracy

Brazilian Telenovelas and the Myth of Racial Democracy

Author: Samantha Nogueira Joyce

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739169653

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 7291

Samantha Nogueira Joyce's Brazilian Telenovelas and the Myth of Racial Democracy traces the representations of Afro-Brazilians on television, culminating with the telenovela Duas Caras (2007-2008), and reveals how telenovelas contribute to social change in ways that have not been fully explored in previous scholarship. It also provides a comparative analysis between the representation of Blacks in Brazil and in the United States while it tracks the dynamic process through which Duas Caras worked to debunk the myth and ideology of racial democracy in Brazil.

Cold War Civil Rights

Race and the Image of American Democracy

Author: Mary L. Dudziak

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400839882

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 8540

In 1958, an African-American handyman named Jimmy Wilson was sentenced to die in Alabama for stealing two dollars. Shocking as this sentence was, it was overturned only after intense international attention and the interference of an embarrassed John Foster Dulles. Soon after the United States' segregated military defeated a racist regime in World War II, American racism was a major concern of U.S. allies, a chief Soviet propaganda theme, and an obstacle to American Cold War goals throughout Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Each lynching harmed foreign relations, and "the Negro problem" became a central issue in every administration from Truman to Johnson. In what may be the best analysis of how international relations affected any domestic issue, Mary Dudziak interprets postwar civil rights as a Cold War feature. She argues that the Cold War helped facilitate key social reforms, including desegregation. Civil rights activists gained tremendous advantage as the government sought to polish its international image. But improving the nation's reputation did not always require real change. This focus on image rather than substance--combined with constraints on McCarthy-era political activism and the triumph of law-and-order rhetoric--limited the nature and extent of progress. Archival information, much of it newly available, supports Dudziak's argument that civil rights was Cold War policy. But the story is also one of people: an African-American veteran of World War II lynched in Georgia; an attorney general flooded by civil rights petitions from abroad; the teenagers who desegregated Little Rock's Central High; African diplomats denied restaurant service; black artists living in Europe and supporting the civil rights movement from overseas; conservative politicians viewing desegregation as a communist plot; and civil rights leaders who saw their struggle eclipsed by Vietnam. Never before has any scholar so directly connected civil rights and the Cold War. Contributing mightily to our understanding of both, Dudziak advances--in clear and lively prose--a new wave of scholarship that corrects isolationist tendencies in American history by applying an international perspective to domestic affairs. In her new preface, Dudziak discusses the way the Cold War figures into civil rights history, and details this book's origins, as one question about civil rights could not be answered without broadening her research from domestic to international influences on American history.

Race and Democracy in the Americas

Author: Georgia Anne Persons

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9780765809926

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 717

Race and Democracy in the Americas examines dimensions of the comparative dynamics of race and ethnicity, with a directed focus on the Americas, most particularly Brazil and the United States. Brazil and the United States are two countries in the Americas that have been major hosts for the African diaspora. Both countries experienced prolonged enslavement of Africans and both now claim to be beacons of democracy for much of the developing world. Both Afro-Brazilians and African Americans have fielded major liberation movements against racism and oppression yet both groups continue to experience considerable residual racial discrimination and displacement. Brazil and the U.S. remain racialized societies though both officially purport to be otherwise. The chapters of this volume illuminate a common search for understanding how race operates in societies generally, and how shapes life opportunities for African Americans and Afro-Brazilians, both oppressed by this most detrimental social construction. The project that fueled this volume represented a rare opportunity for collaboration between Afro-Brazilian scholars and their African American counterparts. This volume offers a passionate conversation between colleagues who have endured common sociopolitical and cultural struggles, but who have only belatedly been able to meet and connect as individuals. Both groups share identities as scholars and activists, for neither identity alone is sufficient to nourish the longings of their hearts nor of their consciences. This volume also represents an all too rare opportunity to give voice and expression to the work of Afro-Brazilian scholars. Volume 9 of the National Political Science Review also carries a special tribute to Mack Henry Jones, a senior black political scientist retiring from Atlanta University and honors Jones's legacy and continues his quest for understanding the nature and intricacies of oppression and possible paths to liberation. This essential work will be of particular interest to ethnic studies specialists, African American studies scholars, political scientists, historians, and sociologists. Georgia A. Persons is professor of political science in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology where she also directs the Center for the Study of Social Change.

Politics After Hope

Obama and the Crisis of Youth, Race, and Democracy

Author: Henry A. Giroux

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317254007

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 9542

As the new administration moved beyond its first year in office, Obama's politics of hope increasingly has been transformed into a politics of accommodation. To many of his supporters, his quest for pragmatism and realism has become a weakness rather than a strength. By focusing on those areas where Obama grounded his own sense of possibility, Giroux critically investigates the well-being and future of young people, including the necessity to overcome racial injustices, the importance of abiding by the promise of a democracy to come, and the indisputable value of education in democracy. Giroux shows why considerations provide the ethical and political foundations for enabling hope to live up to its promises, while making civic responsibility and education central to a movement that takes democracy seriously.