After the War on Crime

Race, Democracy, and a New Reconstruction

Author: Mary Louise Frampton,Ian Haney Lopez,Jonathan Simon

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814727829

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 1456

Since the 1970s, Americans have witnessed a pyrrhic war on crime, with sobering numbers at once chilling and cautionary. Our imprisoned population has increased five-fold, with a commensurate spike in fiscal costs that many now see as unsupportable into the future. As American society confronts a multitude of new challenges ranging from terrorism to the disappearance of middle-class jobs to global warming, the war on crime may be up for reconsideration for the first time in a generation or more. Relatively low crime rates indicate that the public mood may be swinging toward declaring victory and moving on. However, to declare that the war is over is dangerous and inaccurate, and After the War on Crime reveals that the impact of this war reaches far beyond statistics; simply moving on is impossible. The war has been most devastating to those affected by increased rates and longer terms of incarceration, but its reach has also reshaped a sweeping range of social institutions, including law enforcement, politics, schooling, healthcare, and social welfare. The war has also profoundly altered conceptions of race and community. It is time to consider the tasks reconstruction must tackle. To do so requires first a critical assessment of how this war has remade our society, and then creative thinking about how government, foundations, communities, and activists should respond. After the War on Crime accelerates this reassessment with original essays by a diverse, interdisciplinary group of scholars as well as policy professionals and community activists. The volume's immediate goal is to spark a fresh conversation about the war on crime and its consequences; its long-term aspiration is to develop a clear understanding of how we got here and of where we should go.

Race & Democracy

The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana, 1915-1972

Author: Adam Fairclough

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820331140

Category: History

Page: 610

View: 6937

From the foundation of the New Orleans branch of the NAACP in 1915 to the beginning of Edwin Edwards' first term as governor in 1972, this is a wide-ranging study of the civil rights struggle in Louisiana. This edition contains a new preface which brings the narrative up-to-date, including coverage of Hurricane Katrina.

Racism in a Racial Democracy

The Maintenance of White Supremacy in Brazil

Author: France Winddance Twine

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813523651

Category: History

Page: 175

View: 4021

In Racism in a Racial Democracy, France Winddance Twine asks why Brazilians, particularly Afro-Brazilians, continue to have faith in Brazil's "racial democracy" in the face of pervasive racism in all spheres of Brazilian life. Through a detailed ethnography, Twine provides a cultural analysis of the everyday discursive and material practices that sustain and naturalize white supremacy. This is the first ethnographic study of racism in southeastern Brazil to place the practices of upwardly mobile Afro-Brazilians at the center of analysis. Based on extensive field research and more than fifty life histories with Afro- and Euro-Brazilians, this book analyzes how Brazilians conceptualize and respond to racial disparities. Twine illuminates the obstacles Brazilian activists face when attempting to generate grassroots support for an antiracist movement among the majority of working class Brazilians. Anyone interested in racism and antiracism in Latin America will find this book compelling.

Rituals of Race

American Public Culture and the Search for Racial Democracy

Author: Alessandra Lorini

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN: 9780813918716

Category: Political Science

Page: 305

View: 6402

In this sophisticated study of the struggle for African American human rights in America, Alessandra Lorini examines public events in New York City from the end of the Civil War through World War I, demonstrating how ritualized elements of black processions, parades, riots, and festivals made visible the inherent paradox of the "separate but equal" doctrine of the time. By examining these public events, Lorini dramatizes the quest for liberty and equality as a story of living forces, not abstract principles and legal maneuvers. Lorini defines public culture as a conflictual space in which gender, race, and class alliances are made and remade in the ongoing battle for expanded democracy. She then explores how public rituals directly confronted the demeaning representations of blacks prevalent in America's civic and national culture—particularly the idea of black racial inferiority outlined in theories of "racial science." Through rituals, blacks constructed collective memories and identities, which ultimately served as the basis for their assertion of what Lorini calls "participatory democracy," a movement created by ordinary citizens in which activists such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Ida Wells-Barnett, Mary White Ovington, and Booker T. Washington could attempt to effect social change.

Racial Democracy and the Black Metropolis

Housing Policy in Postwar Chicago

Author: Preston H. Smith

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816637024

Category: Political Science

Page: 433

View: 9149

How a black elite fighting racial discrimination reinforced class inequality in postwar America

Race and Democracy in the Americas

Author: Georgia Anne Persons

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN: 9780765809926

Category: Political Science

Page: 260

View: 885

Race and Democracy in the Americas examines dimensions of the comparative dynamics of race and ethnicity, with a directed focus on the Americas, most particularly Brazil and the United States. Brazil and the United States are two countries in the Americas that have been major hosts for the African diaspora. Both countries experienced prolonged enslavement of Africans and both now claim to be beacons of democracy for much of the developing world. Both Afro-Brazilians and African Americans have fielded major liberation movements against racism and oppression yet both groups continue to experience considerable residual racial discrimination and displacement. Brazil and the U.S. remain racialized societies though both officially purport to be otherwise. The chapters of this volume illuminate a common search for understanding how race operates in societies generally, and how shapes life opportunities for African Americans and Afro-Brazilians, both oppressed by this most detrimental social construction. The project that fueled this volume represented a rare opportunity for collaboration between Afro-Brazilian scholars and their African American counterparts. This volume offers a passionate conversation between colleagues who have endured common sociopolitical and cultural struggles, but who have only belatedly been able to meet and connect as individuals. Both groups share identities as scholars and activists, for neither identity alone is sufficient to nourish the longings of their hearts nor of their consciences. This volume also represents an all too rare opportunity to give voice and expression to the work of Afro-Brazilian scholars. Volume 9 of the National Political Science Review also carries a special tribute to Mack Henry Jones, a senior black political scientist retiring from Atlanta University and honors Jones's legacy and continues his quest for understanding the nature and intricacies of oppression and possible paths to liberation. This essential work will be of particular interest to ethnic studies specialists, African American studies scholars, political scientists, historians, and sociologists. Georgia A. Persons is professor of political science in the School of Public Policy at Georgia Institute of Technology where she also directs the Center for the Study of Social Change.

Brazilian Telenovelas and the Myth of Racial Democracy

Author: Samantha Nogueira Joyce

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739169653

Category: Social Science

Page: 150

View: 2036

Samantha Nogueira Joyce's Brazilian Telenovelas and the Myth of Racial Democracy traces the representations of Afro-Brazilians on television, culminating with the telenovela Duas Caras (2007-2008), and reveals how telenovelas contribute to social change in ways that have not been fully explored in previous scholarship. It also provides a comparative analysis between the representation of Blacks in Brazil and in the United States while it tracks the dynamic process through which Duas Caras worked to debunk the myth and ideology of racial democracy in Brazil.

Race and Democracy in the Americas

Author: Georgia A. Persons

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351495127

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 7023

Race and Democracy in the Americas examines dimensions of the comparative dynamics of race and ethnicity, with a directed focus on the Americas, most particularly Brazil and the United States. Brazil and the United States are two countries in the Americas that have been major hosts for the African diaspora. Both countries experienced prolonged enslavement of Africans and both now claim to be beacons of democracy for much of the developing world. Both Afro-Brazilians and African Americans have fielded major liberation movements against racism and oppression yet both groups continue to experience considerable residual racial discrimination and displacement. Brazil and the U.S. remain racialized societies though both officially purport to be otherwise.The chapters of this volume illuminate a common search for understanding how race operates in societies generally, and how shapes life opportunities for African Americans and Afro-Brazilians, both oppressed by this most detrimental social construction. The project that fueled this volume represented a rare opportunity for collaboration between Afro-Brazilian scholars and their African American counterparts.This volume offers a passionate conversation between colleagues who have endured common sociopolitical and cultural struggles, but who have only belatedly been able to meet and connect as individuals. Both groups share identities as scholars and activists, for neither identity alone is sufficient to nourish the longings of their hearts nor of their consciences. This volume also represents an all too rare opportunity to give voice and expression to the work of Afro-Brazilian scholars.Volume 9 of the National Political Science Review also carries a special tribute to Mack Henry Jones, a senior black political scientist retiring from Atlanta University and honors Jones's legacy and continues his quest for understanding the nature and intricacies of oppression and possible paths to liberatio

Days of Hope

Race and Democracy in the New Deal Era

Author: Patricia Sullivan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807864897

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 5639

In the 1930s and 1940s, a loose alliance of blacks and whites, individuals and organizations, came together to offer a radical alternative to southern conservative politics. In Days of Hope, Patricia Sullivan traces the rise and fall of this movement. Using oral interviews with participants in this movement as well as documentary sources, she demonstrates that the New Deal era inspired a coalition of liberals, black activists, labor organizers, and Communist Party workers who sought to secure the New Deal's social and economic reforms by broadening the base of political participation in the South. From its origins in a nationwide campaign to abolish the poll tax, the initiative to expand democracy in the South developed into a regional drive to register voters and elect liberals to Congress. The NAACP, the CIO Political Action Committee, and the Southern Conference for Human Welfare coordinated this effort, which combined local activism with national strategic planning. Although it dramatically increased black voter registration and led to some electoral successes, the movement ultimately faltered, according to Sullivan, because the anti-Communist fervor of the Cold War and a militant backlash from segregationists fractured the coalition and marginalized southern radicals. Nevertheless, the story of this campaign invites a fuller consideration of the possibilities and constraints that have shaped the struggle for racial democracy in America since the 1930s.

Race, Religion, and Late Democracy

Author: John L. Jackson,David K. Kim

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 1452218250

Category: Social Science

Page: 196

View: 1252

Introduction : Democracy's anxious returns / David Kyuman Kim and John L. Jackson, Jr. - "Look, baby, we got Jesus on our flag" : robust democracy and religious debate from the era of slavery to the age of Obama / Edward J. Blum -- Forerunner : the campaigns and career of Edward Brooke / Jason Sokol -- Iran's French Revolution : religion, philosophy, and crowds / Roxanne Varzi - Democracy's new song : Black reconstruction in America, 1860-1880 and the melodramatic imagination / Marina Bilbija - Habits of the heart : youth religious participation as progress, peril, or change? / Monica R. Miller and Ezekiel J. Dixon-Roman - Populism and late liberalism : a special affinity? / Jean Comaroff -- Chadors, feminists, terror : the racial politics of U.S. media representations of the 1979 Iranian women's movement / Sylvia Chan-Malik -- The end of neoliberalism : what is left of the left / John Comaroff - Religion as race, recognition as democracy : Lemba "Black Jews" in South Africa / Noah Tamarkin - The race toward caraqueño citizenship : negotiating race, class, and participatory democracy / Giles Harrison-Conwill - The racialization of Islam in American law / Neil Gotanda

The Black Child-Savers

Racial Democracy and Juvenile Justice

Author: Geoff K. Ward

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226873161

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 6069

During the Progressive Era, a rehabilitative agenda took hold of American juvenile justice, materializing as a citizen-and-state-building project and mirroring the unequal racial politics of American democracy itself. Alongside this liberal "manufactory of citizens,” a parallel structure was enacted: a Jim Crow juvenile justice system that endured across the nation for most of the twentieth century. In The Black Child Savers, the first study of the rise and fall of Jim Crow juvenile justice, Geoff Ward examines the origins and organization of this separate and unequal juvenile justice system. Ward explores how generations of “black child-savers” mobilized to challenge the threat to black youth and community interests and how this struggle grew aligned with a wider civil rights movement, eventually forcing the formal integration of American juvenile justice. Ward’s book reveals nearly a century of struggle to build a more democratic model of juvenile justice—an effort that succeeded in part, but ultimately failed to deliver black youth and community to liberal rehabilitative ideals. At once an inspiring story about the shifting boundaries of race, citizenship, and democracy in America and a crucial look at the nature of racial inequality, The Black Child Savers is a stirring account of the stakes and meaning of social justice.

Cannibal Democracy

Race and Representation in the Literature of the Americas

Author: Zita Nunes

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816648409

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 8975

Zita Nunes argues that the prevailing narratives of identity formation throughout the Americas share a dependence on metaphors of incorporation and, often, of cannibalism. From the position of the incorporating body, the construction of a national and racial identity through a process of assimilation presupposes a remainder, a residue. Nunes addresses works by writers and artists who explore what is left behind in the formation of national identities and speak to the limits of the contemporary discourse of democracy. Cannibal Democracy tracks its central metaphor’s circulation through the work of writers such as Mrio de Andrade, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Toni Morrison and journalists of the black press, as well as work by visual artists including Magdalena Campos-Pons and Keith Piper, and reveals how exclusion-understood in terms of what is left out-can be fruitfully understood in terms of what is left over from a process of unification or incorporation. Nunes shows that while this remainder can be deferred into the future-lurking as a threat to the desired stability of the present-the residue haunts discourses of national unity, undermining the ideologies of democracy that claim to resolve issues of race. Zita Nunes is associate professor of English at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Wie Demokratien sterben

Und was wir dagegen tun können

Author: Steven Levitsky,Daniel Ziblatt

Publisher: DVA

ISBN: 3641222915

Category: Political Science

Page: 320

View: 8185

Ausgezeichnet mit dem NDR Kultur Sachbuchpreis 2018 als bestes Sachbuch des Jahres Demokratien sterben mit einem Knall oder mit einem Wimmern. Der Knall, also das oft gewaltsame Ende einer Demokratie durch einen Putsch, einen Krieg oder eine Revolution, ist spektakulärer. Doch das Dahinsiechen einer Demokratie, das Sterben mit einem Wimmern, ist alltäglicher – und gefährlicher, weil die Bürger meist erst aufwachen, wenn es zu spät ist. Mit Blick auf die USA, Lateinamerika und Europa zeigen die beiden Politologen Steven Levitsky und Daniel Ziblatt, woran wir erkennen, dass demokratische Institutionen und Prozesse ausgehöhlt werden. Und sie sagen, an welchen Punkten wir eingreifen können, um diese Entwicklung zu stoppen. Denn mit gezielter Gegenwehr lässt sich die Demokratie retten – auch vom Sterbebett.

Herbert Aptheker on Race and Democracy

A Reader

Author: Herbert Aptheker,Eric Foner,Manning Marable

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 025203029X

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 2688

Barred from the academy for most of his life because of his political views, Herbert Aptheker (1915-2003) nevertheless forged a path in the field of African American studies decades before the civil rights movement reached fruition. On Race and Democracy collects fourteen of his essays. Written with passion and eloquence, they are full of ideas originally dismissed by a white, segregated academy that have now become part of the scholarly mainstream. Covering topics including the maroons, black abolitionists, Reconstruction, and W. E. B. Du Bois, the essays of On Race and Democracy demonstrate the critical connection between political commitment and the advancement of scholarship, while restoring Aptheker's central place in the development of African American studies.

Race in Another America

The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil

Author: Edward E. Telles

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 140083743X

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 361

This is the most comprehensive and up-to-date book on the increasingly important and controversial subject of race relations in Brazil. North American scholars of race relations frequently turn to Brazil for comparisons, since its history has many key similarities to that of the United States. Brazilians have commonly compared themselves with North Americans, and have traditionally argued that race relations in Brazil are far more harmonious because the country encourages race mixture rather than formal or informal segregation. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this national myth, seeking to show that race relations are characterized by exclusion, not inclusion, and that fair-skinned Brazilians continue to be privileged and hold a disproportionate share of wealth and power. In this sociological and demographic study, Edward Telles seeks to understand the reality of race in Brazil and how well it squares with these traditional and revisionist views of race relations. He shows that both schools have it partly right--that there is far more miscegenation in Brazil than in the United States--but that exclusion remains a serious problem. He blends his demographic analysis with ethnographic fieldwork, history, and political theory to try to "understand" the enigma of Brazilian race relations--how inclusiveness can coexist with exclusiveness. The book also seeks to understand some of the political pathologies of buying too readily into unexamined ideas about race relations. In the end, Telles contends, the traditional myth that Brazil had harmonious race relations compared with the United States encouraged the government to do almost nothing to address its shortcomings.

Racial Politics in Contemporary Brazil

Author: Michael Hanchard

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822322726

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 3485

DIVThis is an edited volume which discusses the racial politics of Brazil and the basis and understanding of labor-market and residential segregation in Brazilian society./div

Opposition and Democracy in South Africa

Author: Roger Southall

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135277346

Category: Political Science

Page: 304

View: 1112

This collection examines the nature, scope and prospects for political opposition under African National Congress political dominance.

Handbook of the Sociology of Racial and Ethnic Relations

Author: Hernan Vera,Joe R Feagin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0387708456

Category: Social Science

Page: 494

View: 3468

The study of racial and ethnic relations has become one of the most written about aspects in sociology and sociological research. In both North America and Europe, many "traditional" cultures are feeling threatened by immigrants from Latin America, Africa and Asia. This handbook is a true international collaboration looking at racial and ethnic relations from an academic perspective. It starts from the principle that sociology is at the hub of the human sciences concerned with racial and ethnic relations.