Proudly We Can Be Africans

Black Americans and Africa, 1935-1961

Author: James H. Meriwether

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807860410

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4695

The mid-twentieth century witnessed nations across Africa fighting for their independence from colonial forces. By examining black Americans' attitudes toward and responses to these liberation struggles, James Meriwether probes the shifting meaning of Africa in the intellectual, political, and social lives of African Americans. Paying particular attention to such important figures and organizations as W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King Jr., and the NAACP, Meriwether incisively utilizes the black press, personal correspondence, and oral histories to render a remarkably nuanced and diverse portrait of African American opinion. Meriwether builds the book around seminal episodes in modern African history, including nonviolent protests against apartheid in South Africa, the Mau Mau war in Kenya, Ghana's drive for independence under Kwame Nkrumah, and Patrice Lumumba's murder in the Congo. Viewing these events within the context of their own changing lives, especially in regard to the U.S. civil rights struggle, African Americans have continually reconsidered their relationship to contemporary Africa and vigorously debated how best to translate their concerns into action in the international arena. Grounded in black Americans' encounters with Africa, this transnational history sits astride the leading issues of the twentieth century: race, civil rights, anticolonialism, and the intersections of domestic race relations and U.S. foreign relations.

American Africans in Ghana

Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era

Author: Kevin K. Gaines

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807867829

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 8228

In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans--including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana's president, posed a direct challenge to U.S. hegemony by promoting a vision of African liberation, continental unity, and West Indian federation. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined by solidarities with African peoples, these activists along with their allies in the United States waged a fundamental, if largely forgotten, struggle over the meaning and content of the cornerstone of American citizenship--the right to vote--conferred on African Americans by civil rights reform legislation.

Pullman Porters and the Rise of Protest Politics in Black America, 1925-1945

Author: Beth Tompkins Bates

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807875360

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 4711

Between World War I and World War II, African Americans' quest for civil rights took on a more aggressive character as a new group of black activists challenged the politics of civility traditionally embraced by old-guard leaders in favor of a more forceful protest strategy. Beth Tompkins Bates traces the rise of this new protest politics--which was grounded in making demands and backing them up with collective action--by focusing on the struggle of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) to form a union in Chicago, headquarters of the Pullman Company. Bates shows how the BSCP overcame initial opposition from most of Chicago's black leaders by linking its union message with the broader social movement for racial equality. As members of BSCP protest networks mobilized the black community around the quest for manhood rights and economic freedom, they broke down resistance to organized labor even as they expanded the boundaries of citizenship to include equal economic opportunity. By the mid-1930s, BSCP protest networks gained platforms at the national level, fusing Brotherhood activities first with those of the National Negro Congress and later with the March on Washington Movement. Lessons learned during this era guided the next generation of activists, who carried the black freedom struggle forward after World War II.

Journey of Hope

The Back-to-Africa Movement in Arkansas in the Late 1800s

Author: Kenneth C. Barnes

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807876220

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 9730

Liberia was founded by the American Colonization Society (ACS) in the 1820s as an African refuge for free blacks and liberated American slaves. While interest in African migration waned after the Civil War, it roared back in the late nineteenth century with the rise of Jim Crow segregation and disfranchisement throughout the South. The back-to-Africa movement held great new appeal to the South's most marginalized citizens, rural African Americans. Nowhere was this interest in Liberia emigration greater than in Arkansas. More emigrants to Liberia left from Arkansas than any other state in the 1880s and 1890s. In Journey of Hope, Kenneth C. Barnes explains why so many black Arkansas sharecroppers dreamed of Africa and how their dreams of Liberia differed from the reality. This rich narrative also examines the role of poor black farmers in the creation of a black nationalist identity and the importance of the symbolism of an ancestral continent. Based on letters to the ACS and interviews of descendants of the emigrants in war-torn Liberia, this study captures the life of black sharecroppers in the late 1800s and their dreams of escaping to Africa.

Forging Diaspora

Afro-Cubans and African Americans in a World of Empire and Jim Crow

Author: Frank Andre Guridy

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807833614

Category: History

Page: 270

View: 3910

Cuba's geographic proximity to the United States and its centrality to U.S. imperial designs following the War of 1898 led to the creation of a unique relationship between Afro-descended populations in the two countries. In Forging Diaspora, Frank

America, history and life

Author: American Bibliographical Center,EBSCO Publishing (Firm)

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: United States

Page: N.A

View: 974

Provides historical coverage of the United States and Canada from prehistory to the present. Includes information abstracted from over 2,000 journals published worldwide.

Race for Sanctions

The Movement Against Apartheid, 1946-1994

Author: Francis Njubi Nesbitt

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: African Americans

Page: 736

View: 8616

Program of the ... Annual Meeting

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Historians

Page: N.A

View: 6207

The End of Empires

African Americans and India

Author: Gerald Horne

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1592139000

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 6470

In the past fifty years, according to Christine So, the narratives of many popular Asian American books have been dominated by economic questions-what money can buy, how money is lost, how money is circulated, and what labor or objects are worth. Focusing on books that have achieved mainstream popularity, Economic Citizens unveils the logic of economic exchange that determined Asian Americans’ transnational migrations and national belonging. With penetrating insight, So examines literary works that have been successful in the U.S. marketplace but have been read previously by critics largely as narratives of alienation or assimilation, including Fifth Chinese Daughter, Flower Drum Song, Falling Leaves and Turning Japanese. In contrast to other studies that have focused on the marginalization of Asian Americans, Economic Citizens examines how Asian Americans have entered into the public sphere.

Hidden Figures

Young Readers' Edition

Author: Margot Lee Shetterly

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780606396233

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 8303

For use in schools and libraries only. Now in a special new edition perfect for young readers, this is the amazing true story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program. Soon to be a major motion picture. Before John Glenn orbited the earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as "human computers" used pencils, slide rules, and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space. This book brings to life the stories of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, and Christine Darden, four African-American women who lived through the Civil Rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the movement for gender equality, and whose work forever changed the face of NASA and the country.

"We Shall Overcome"

Die DDR und die amerikanische Bürgerrechtsbewegung

Author: Maria Schubert

Publisher: Verlag Ferdinand Schöningh

ISBN: 3657787690

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 6054

Ihren Kampf begriffen amerikanische Bürgerrechtler seit jeher als einen globalen und trugen diesen auch nach Deutschland in die DDR. Während die SED dort Solidarität mit der afroamerikanischen Bevölkerung verkündete, ermutigten Martin Luther Kings Ideen so manchen zum Widerstand gegen die SED-Diktatur. Maria Schubert untersucht anhand der DDR-Besuche von Paul Robeson, Martin Luther King, Ralph Abernathy und Angela Davis die Wirkungsgeschichte der afro-amerikanischen Bürgerrechtsbewegung im ostdeutschen Staat. Neben der offiziellen SED-Politik gegenüber dem sogenannten "anderen Amerika" stehen die eigenwilligen Umdeutungen des Bildes bei der Bevölkerung im Mittelpunkt. Dabei setzt sich die Autorin mit der Geschichte der afroamerikanischen Bürgerrechtsbewegung und der sozialistischen Gedankenwelt auseinander. Sie zeigt, wie (inner-)gesellschaftliche Entwicklungen in der DDR durch transnationale Einflüsse eine besondere Dynamik erhielten.

Building an Antislavery Wall

Black Americans in the Atlantic Abolitionist Movement, 1830-1860

Author: R. J. M. Blackett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780807110829

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 1354

2002

Author: Massimo Mastrogregori

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN: 3110932989

Category: History

Page: 439

View: 8119

Annually published since 1930, the International bibliography of Historical Sciences (IBOHS) is an international bibliography of the most important historical monographs and periodical articles published throughout the world, which deal with history from the earliest to the most recent times. The works are arranged systematically according to period, region or historical discipline, and within this classification alphabetically. The bibliography contains a geographical index and indexes of persons and authors.

The African nexus

Black American perspectives on the European partitioning of Africa, 1880-1920

Author: Sylvia M. Jacobs

Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 2401

How Europe Underdeveloped Africa

Author: Walter Rodney

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: 1788731204

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 9588

The classic work of political, economic, and historical analysis, powerfully introduced by Angela Davis In his short life, the Guyanese intellectual Walter Rodney emerged as one of the leading thinkers and activists of the anticolonial revolution, leading movements in North America, South America, the African continent, and the Caribbean. In each locale, Rodney found himself a lightning rod for working class Black Power. His deportation catalyzed 20th century Jamaica's most significant rebellion, the 1968 Rodney riots, and his scholarship trained a generation how to think politics at an international scale. In 1980, shortly after founding of the Working People's Alliance in Guyana, the 38-year-old Rodney would be assassinated. In his magnum opus, How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, Rodney incisively argues that grasping "the great divergence" between the west and the rest can only be explained as the exploitation of the latter by the former. This meticulously researched analysis of the abiding repercussions of European colonialism on the continent of Africa has not only informed decades of scholarship and activism, it remains an indispensable study for grasping global inequality today.

The Price of Liberty

African Americans and the Making of Liberia

Author: Claude Andrew Clegg

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807855164

Category: Social Science

Page: 330

View: 6175

In nineteenth-century America, the belief that blacks and whites could not live in social harmony and political equality in the same country led to a movement to relocate African Americans to Liberia, a West African colony established by the United States