Privacy on the Ground

Driving Corporate Behavior in the United States and Europe

Author: Kenneth A. Bamberger

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 909

An examination of corporate privacy management in the United States, Germany, Spain, France, and the United Kingdom, identifying international best practices and making policy recommendations.

The Blockchain and the New Architecture of Trust

Author: Kevin Werbach

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 344

View: 732

How the blockchain—a system built on foundations of mutual mistrust—can become trustworthy. The blockchain entered the world on January 3, 2009, introducing an innovative new trust architecture: an environment in which users trust a system—for example, a shared ledger of information—without necessarily trusting any of its components. The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is the most famous implementation of the blockchain, but hundreds of other companies have been founded and billions of dollars invested in similar applications since Bitcoin's launch. Some see the blockchain as offering more opportunities for criminal behavior than benefits to society. In this book, Kevin Werbach shows how a technology resting on foundations of mutual mistrust can become trustworthy. The blockchain, built on open software and decentralized foundations that allow anyone to participate, seems like a threat to any form of regulation. In fact, Werbach argues, law and the blockchain need each other. Blockchain systems that ignore law and governance are likely to fail, or to become outlaw technologies irrelevant to the mainstream economy. That, Werbach cautions, would be a tragic waste of potential. If, however, we recognize the blockchain as a kind of legal technology that shapes behavior in new ways, it can be harnessed to create tremendous business and social value.

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The Legal and Economic Aftermath of Cybersecurity Breaches

Author: Josephine Wolff

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 336

View: 237

What we can learn from the aftermath of cybersecurity breaches and how we can do a better job protecting online data. Cybersecurity incidents make the news with startling regularity. Each breach—the theft of 145.5 million Americans' information from Equifax, for example, or the Russian government's theft of National Security Agency documents, or the Sony Pictures data dump—makes headlines, inspires panic, instigates lawsuits, and is then forgotten. The cycle of alarm and amnesia continues with the next attack, and the one after that. In this book, cybersecurity expert Josephine Wolff argues that we shouldn't forget about these incidents, we should investigate their trajectory, from technology flaws to reparations for harm done to their impact on future security measures. We can learn valuable lessons in the aftermath of cybersecurity breaches. Wolff describes a series of significant cybersecurity incidents between 2005 and 2015, mapping the entire life cycle of each breach in order to identify opportunities for defensive intervention. She outlines three types of motives underlying these attacks—financial gain, espionage, and public humiliation of the victims—that have remained consistent through a decade of cyberattacks, offers examples of each, and analyzes the emergence of different attack patterns. The enormous TJX breach in 2006, for instance, set the pattern for a series of payment card fraud incidents that led to identity fraud and extortion; the Chinese army conducted cyberespionage campaigns directed at U.S.-based companies from 2006 to 2014, sparking debate about the distinction between economic and political espionage; and the 2014 breach of the Ashley Madison website was aimed at reputations rather than bank accounts.

Law, Policy and the Internet

Author: Lilian Edwards

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 480

View: 221

This comprehensive textbook by the editor of Law and the Internet seeks to provide students, practitioners and businesses with an up-to-date and accessible account of the key issues in internet law and policy from a European and UK perspective. The internet has advanced in the last 20 years from an esoteric interest to a vital and unavoidable part of modern work, rest and play. As such, an account of how the internet and its users are regulated is vital for everyone concerned with the modern information society. This book also addresses the fact that internet regulation is not just a matter of law but increasingly intermixed with technology, economics and politics. Policy developments are closely analysed as an intrinsic part of modern governance. Law, Policy and the Internet focuses on two key areas: e-commerce, including the role and responsibilities of online intermediaries such as Google, Facebook and Uber; and privacy, data protection and online crime. In particular there is detailed up-to-date coverage of the crucially important General Data Protection Regulation which came into force in May 2018.

Research Handbook on Corporate Legal Responsiblity

Author: Stephen Tully

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 456

View: 566

What I liked in particular about the Handbook was that each chapter identified the issues within a theoretical context and then gave the historical perspective with an accurate account of the current legal position and set down clear markers on the issues likely to influence future developments in corporate responsibility. Phillip Taylor, The Barrister This book has drawn together a distinguished and international group of writers to provide a wide-ranging discussion of the responsibility of corporations to society in general, including discussion of the role of companies in promoting human rights, accomplishing sustainable development and restoring and keeping public trust . The contributors put calls for Corporate Social Responsibility into its legal framework and provide a wide range of possible solutions to perceived weaknesses in the law. The authors are to be congratulated for adhering to the editorial mandate to provide information in a succinct style which is comprehensible to the lay person as much as the well-informed . This work is an indispensable tool for anyone engaged in the globalisation debate. It gives valuable, international, multi-faceted insights on the current situation, on work-in-progress to create change and of the theoretical perspectives which inform both. Janet Dine, Queen Mary College, University of London, UK Finally a book that explores the legal considerations related to corporate responsibility, and does so from a global perspective with strong underpinnings of ethics. This book should prove a useful guide for those academics and managers interested in the historical and emerging legal framework that guides corporate decision making around responsibility. Sandra Waddock, Boston College, US This volume provides an invaluable collection of essays that consider diverse perspectives on the social responsibility of corporations. As such it provides a very satisfying and balanced combination of contributions that should be useful to any serious student either in practice or academe of the role of corporations in society. David Crowther, London Metropolitan University, UK The ever-important topic of corporate legal responsibility is deconstructed into many multifaceted components in this fascinating Handbook, which systematically examines each in turn and describes the contemporary legal position. The Research Handbook on Corporate Legal Responsibility considers general theory and basic concepts such as corporate legal personality, the doctrine of attribution, corporate governance and directors duties, and reviews the range of individuals to which corporations may be held responsible, particularly employees, suppliers, shareholders, stakeholders and women. The substantive grounds for corporate responsibility under civil and criminal law within the North American and Commonwealth jurisdictions are evaluated, and mechanisms of accountability such as novel regulatory processes (interactive regulation, codes of conduct and social reporting), risk management and the significant role of non-governmental organisations are identified. The thought-provoking chapters contained within this Handbook go on to present perspectives on topical international questions (corruption, labour standards, human rights, environmental protection and sustainable development) including an analysis of recent initiatives from several international organisations. Bringing together the work of around thirty leading academics, practitioners, campaigners and policymakers from North America, Europe and Australia, each chapter locates these issues within a theoretical context, giving an overview of its historical evolution, providing an accurate account of the current legal position and identifying policy issues likely to influence future developments.

The Economist: Marketing for Growth

The role of marketers in driving revenues and profits

Author: Iain Ellwood

Publisher: Profile Books

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 210

View: 145

Marketing for Growth is a guide to how the marketing function within a business can and should become its most important driver of growth. Marketers play a crucial role in generating revenue and they can play an equally important role in how revenues translate into profit. Growth is also about becoming a better business by being smarter or more efficient, and growing in a sustainable way. This involves developing and improving products, processes and standard of service. Marketers have their ear to the ground and therefore are often the first to pick up on changing customer needs and behaviour and the forces at play in markets. This increases the impact marketing should have on all those aspects of a business. The book is in three parts: the first part explores who are the most valuable customers, the second the most effective ways to drive revenue growth and the third the best ways to improve profitability. It combines insight and practical guidance, and is supported by a wealth of hard data and anecdotal evidence based on the experiences of a wide range of business in Britain, America, Europe and Asia. Among the firms featured are Amazon, China Mobile, Dove, Goldman Sachs, Haier, ING Direct, Lenovo, Mini, Procter & Gamble, Red Bull, Target, Twitter, Virgin and Zara.

Organizing America

Wealth, Power, and the Origins of Corporate Capitalism

Author: Charles Perrow

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 707

American society today is shaped not nearly as much by vast open spaces as it is by vast, bureaucratic organizations. Over half the working population toils away at enterprises with 500 or more employees--up from zero percent in 1800. Is this institutional immensity the logical outcome of technological forces in an all-efficient market, as some have argued? In this book, the first organizational history of nineteenth-century America, Yale sociologist Charles Perrow says no. He shows that there was nothing inevitable about the surge in corporate size and power by century's end. Critics railed against the nationalizing of the economy, against corporations' monopoly powers, political subversion, environmental destruction, and "wage slavery." How did a nation committed to individual freedom, family firms, public goods, and decentralized power become transformed in one century? Bountiful resources, a mass market, and the industrial revolution gave entrepreneurs broad scope. In Europe, the state and the church kept private organizations small and required consideration of the public good. In America, the courts and business-steeped legislators removed regulatory constraints over the century, centralizing industry and privatizing the railroads. Despite resistance, the corporate form became the model for the next century. Bureaucratic structure spread to government and the nonprofits. Writing in the tradition of Max Weber, Perrow concludes that the driving force of our history is not technology, politics, or culture, but large, bureaucratic organizations. Perrow, the author of award-winning books on organizations, employs his witty, trenchant, and graceful style here to maximum effect. Colorful vignettes abound: today's headlines echo past battles for unchecked organizational freedom; socially responsible alternatives that were tried are explored along with the historical contingencies that sent us down one road rather than another. No other book takes the role of organizations in America's development as seriously. The resultant insights presage a new historical genre.