The Assessment Center Handbook for Police and Fire Personnel

Author: Charles D. Hale

Publisher: Charles C Thomas Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 226

View: 445

Assessment centers continue to be widely used as the preferred and accepted manner of evaluating potential members of police and fire departments as a part of their standardized promotional examination process. This third edition of this most successful book expands upon the concepts and principles of the first two editions and introduces new innovations. Chapters have been extensively edited and reformatted. New sections have been added covering the tactical EMS problem and public education exercises. An entirely new chapter, “Best Practices in Assessment Center Exercises,” provides many examples of how candidates can achieve superior performance in many different kinds of assessment exercises. An additional new section offers opportunities for incorporating advancing technologies in assessment center programs. The text continues to offer invaluable insight concerning the reliability, cost-effectiveness, and objective methods for the selection of candidates for higher appointments. Reviewed are the advantages of an assessment center, typical assessment center exercises, design and administration, selection and training, candidate evaluation and scoring methods, and preparation. A substantial appendix provides many valuable resource tools, including exercise plans, typical schedules, candidate evaluation and assessor feedback forms, room configurations, and feedback questionnaires. The text continues to be the authoritative source for assessment center administrators.

Policy Issues in Employment Testing

Author: Linda C. Wing

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 329

View: 415

Linda C. Wing and Bernard R. Gifford How should a society committed to the ideas of individual merit, equal opportunity, and the free marketplace allocate scarce educational and employment opportunities? How can that society draw distinctions fairly and justifiably-among people competing against each other for the same opportunity? These are among the central questions of a democracy. How a society answers them reveals a great deal about its values and its priorities, and determines a great deal about its future course. In recent decades, we have placed the standardized pencil-and-paper test at the center of these fundamental questions about the nature of opportunity allocation in American life. In more and more areas of our lives-schools, employment, the military-we rely upon the standardized test to rank or classify people, and to assure ourselves that we have done so fairly. The papers gathered here were prepared at the invitation of the National Commission on Testing and Public Policy. (The editors of this volume were involved in the commission from its inception in 1987 until shortly after the publication of its major public report in 1990-Bernard Gifford as Chair and Linda Wing as Associate Director. 1) Each chapter focuses on an aspect of employment testing-a topic that could hardly 1 POLICY ISSUES IN EMPLOYMENT TESTING 2 be more in need of calm deliberation and reasoned discussion than it is today.

Learning from Error in Policing

A Case Study in Organizational Accident Theory

Author: Jon Shane

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 91

View: 587

​While the proximate cause of any accident is usually someone’s immediate action— or omission (failure to act)—there is often a trail of underlying latent conditions that facilitated their error: the person has, in effect, been unwittingly “set up” for failure by the organization. This Brief explores an accident in policing, as a framework for examining existing police practices. Learning from Error in Policing describes a case of wrongful arrest from the perspective of organizational accident theory, which suggests a single unsafe act—in this case a wrongful arrest—is facilitated by several underlying latent conditions that triggered the event and failed to stop the harm once in motion. The analysis demonstrates that the risk of errors committed by omission (failing to act) were significantly more likely to occur than errors committed by acts of commission. By examining this case, policy implications and directions for future research are discussed. The analysis of this case, and the underlying lessons learned from it will have important implications for researchers and practitioners in the policing field.​

Police Manpower Management

A Selected Bibliography

Author: Ronnie Mills

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Police administration

Page: 50

View: 388

Modern Police Management

Author: Richard N. Holden

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 380

View: 193

Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement

Author: Larry E. Sullivan

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1508

View: 383

This three-volume Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement provides a comprehensive, critical, and descriptive examination of all facets of law enforcement on the state and local, federal and national, and international stages. This work is a unique reference source that provides readers with informed discussions on the practice and theory of policing in an historical and contemporary framework. The volumes treat subjects that are particular to the area of state and local, federal and national, and international policing. Many of the themes and issues of policing cut across disciplinary borders, however, and several entries provide comparative information that places the subject in context.