Plantation

Author: Dorothea Benton Frank

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 608

View: 793

New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank evokes a lush plantation in the heart of modern-day South Carolina—where family ties and hidden truths run as deep and dark as the mighty Edisto River. Caroline Wimbley Levine always swore she’d never go home again. But now, at her brother’s behest, she has returned to South Carolina to see about Mother—only to find that the years have not changed the Queen of Tall Pines Plantation. Miss Lavinia is as maddeningly eccentric as ever—and absolutely will not suffer the questionable advice of her children. This does not surprise Caroline. Nor does the fact that Tall Pines is still brimming with scandals and secrets, betrayals and lies. But she soon discovers that something is different this time around. It lies somewhere in the distance between her and her mother—and in her understanding of what it means to come home…

Contemporary Authors

New Revision

Author: Gale Cengage Publishing

Publisher: Gale Cengage

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 446

View: 446

A biographical and bibliographical guide to current writers in all fields including poetry, fiction and nonfiction, journalism, drama, television and movies. Information is provided by the authors themselves or drawn from published interviews, feature stories, book reviews and other materials provided by the authors/publishers.

Charleston Icons

50 Symbols of the Holy City

Author: Ida Becker

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 112

View: 210

Charleston Icons celebrates the Holy City through full-color photographs and evocative essays highlighting fifty of the best places, foods, buildings, institutions, and inventions that Charleston has to offer. From the four corners of law to sweetgrass baskets, the Spoleto Festival to shrimp, grits, and boiled peanuts, this book showcases what makes Charleston special.

An Antebellum Plantation Household

Including the South Carolina Low Country Receipts and Remedies of Emily Wharton Sinkler

Author: Anne Sinkler Whaley LeClercq

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 200

View: 501

This receipt book provides a flavorful record of plantation cooking, folk medicine, travel, and social life in the antebellum South, with 82 recently discovered additional receipts.

The South Carolina Rice Plantation as Revealed in the Papers of Robert F. W. Allston

Author: Robert Francis Withers Allston

Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 482

View: 266

The reissue of The South Carolina Rice Plantation as Revealed in the Papers of Robert F. W. Allston makes available for a new generation of readers a firsthand look at one of South Carolina's most influential antebellum dynasties and the institutions of slavery and plantation agriculture upon which it was built. Often cited by historians, Robert F. W. Allston's letters, speeches, receipts, and ledger entries chronicle both the heyday of the rice industry and its precipitate crash during the Civil War. As Daniel C. Littlefield underscores in his introduction to the new edition, these papers are significant not only because of Allston's position at the apex of planter society but also because his views represented those of the rice planter elite.

Remaking Wormsloe Plantation

The Environmental History of a Lowcountry Landscape

Author: Drew A. Swanson

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 173

Why do we preserve certain landscapes while developing others without restraint? Drew A. Swanson’s in-depth look at Wormsloe plantation, located on the salt marshes outside of Savannah, Georgia, explores that question while revealing the broad historical forces that have shaped the lowcountry South. Wormsloe is one of the most historic and ecologically significant stretches of the Georgia coast. It has remained in the hands of one family from 1736, when Georgia’s Trustees granted it to Noble Jones, through the 1970s, when much of Wormsloe was ceded to Georgia for the creation of a state historic site. It has served as a guard post against aggression from Spanish Florida; a node in an emerging cotton economy connected to far-flung places like Lancashire and India; a retreat for pleasure and leisure; and a carefully maintained historic site and green space. Like many lowcountry places, Wormsloe is inextricably tied to regional, national, and global environments and is the product of transatlantic exchanges. Swanson argues that while visitors to Wormsloe value what they perceive to be an “authentic,” undisturbed place, this landscape is actually the product of aggressive management over generations. He also finds that Wormsloe is an ideal place to get at hidden stories, such as African American environmental and agricultural knowledge, conceptions of health and disease, the relationship between manual labor and views of nature, and the ties between historic preservation and natural resource conservation. Remaking Wormsloe Plantation connects this distinct Georgia place to the broader world, adding depth and nuance to the understanding of our own conceptions of nature and history.

Tales of the South Carolina Low Country

Author: Nancy Rhyne

Publisher: John F. Blair, Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 93

View: 657

With her tape recorder in hand, the author interviewed dozens of Low Country people, finding that almost every person had a story to tell. She sought out everyone from millionaires to the humblest of coastal people. From their narratives she has fashioned a collection of stories steeped in the history and character of the Low Country. Some of the tales in this collection are humorous, some mysterious. Others are positively eerie. There are stories of killer hurricanes, bizarre voodoo practices and inexplicable happenings. Effortlessly, the author takes us from a gorgeous plantation estate of the 1850s to an overgrown and forbidding cemetery in 1979. And she never fails to keep our attention on this somewhat alien but fascinating world--a world peopled with witch doctors, ghosts, cruel overseers, slaves and world-famous personalities.

True Tales of the South at War

How Soldiers Fought and Families Lived, 1861-1865

Author: Clarence Poe

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 435

DIVTreasury of reminiscences includes battlefield correspondence, diary entries, journals kept on the homefront, stories told to children and grandchildren, more. Intimate, compelling record. /div

Lowcountry Voodoo

Beginner's Guide to Tales, Spells and Boo Hags

Author: Terrance Zepke

Publisher: Pineapple Press Inc

ISBN:

Category: FICTION

Page: 151

View: 530

When African slaves were brought to the American South to work the plantations, they brought with them their culture, traditions, and religion--including what came to be called voodoo. This unique blend of Christianity, herbalism, and folk magic is still practiced in South Carolina's Lowcountry. Though a beginners guide, Lowcountry Voodoo offers a surprising wealth of information about this fascinating part of Lowcountry life. Learn about: the Gullah and their ways how to bring good luck and avoid bad luck spells and curses and how to avoid them how to cook up traditional good-luck meals for New Years Day a real voodoo village you can visit sweetgrass baskets events and tours to acquaint you with Lowcountry culture. In a selection of Lowcountry tales that feature voodoo, meet: a boo hag bride who sheds her skin at night Dr. Buzzard, the most famous root doctor a giant ghost dog a young man whose love potion worked too well George Powell, who outwitted a haint Crook-Neck Dick, who (mostly) outwitted a hangman Doctor Trott, who captured a mermaid.