Paying for the Party

Author: Elizabeth A. Armstrong,Laura T. Hamilton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674073517

Category: Education

Page: 340

View: 8412

In an era of skyrocketing tuition and concern over whether college is “worth it,” Paying for the Party is an indispensable contribution to the dialogue assessing the state of American higher education. A powerful exposé of unmet obligations and misplaced priorities, it explains in detail why so many leave college with so little to show for it.

Paying for the Party

Author: Elizabeth A. Armstrong,Laura T. Hamilton

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674073541

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 9285

In an era of skyrocketing tuition and concern over whether college is “worth it,” Paying for the Party is an indispensable contribution to the dialogue assessing the state of American higher education. A powerful exposé of unmet obligations and misplaced priorities, it explains in detail why so many leave college with so little to show for it.

Paying for the Party

How College Maintains Inequality

Author: Elizabeth A. Armstrong,Laura T. Hamilton

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780674088023

Category: Education

Page: 344

View: 1828

In an era of skyrocketing tuition and concern over whether college is âeoeworth it,âe this is an indispensable contribution to the dialogue assessing the state of American higher education. A powerful exposé of unmet obligations and misplaced priorities, it explains in detail why so many leave college with so little to show for it.

Degrees of Inequality

Culture, Class, and Gender in American Higher Education

Author: Ann L. Mullen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 9780801899126

Category: Education

Page: 264

View: 7616

Moving interviews with 100 students at the two institutions highlight how American higher education reinforces the same inequities it has been aiming to transcend.

Parenting to a Degree

How Family Matters for College Women's Success

Author: Laura T. Hamilton

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022618367X

Category: Education

Page: 224

View: 2990

Helicopter parents—the kind that continue to hover even in college—are one of the most ridiculed figures of twenty-first-century parenting, criticized for creating entitled young adults who boomerang back home. But do involved parents really damage their children and burden universities? In this book, sociologist Laura T. Hamilton illuminates the lives of young women and their families to ask just what role parents play during the crucial college years. Hamilton vividly captures the parenting approaches of mothers and fathers from all walks of life—from a CFO for a Fortune 500 company to a waitress at a roadside diner. As she shows, parents are guided by different visions of the ideal college experience, built around classed notions of women’s work/family plans and the ideal age to “grow up.” Some are intensively involved and hold adulthood at bay to cultivate specific traits: professional helicopters, for instance, help develop the skills and credentials that will advance their daughters’ careers, while pink helicopters emphasize appearance, charm, and social ties in the hopes that women will secure a wealthy mate. In sharp contrast, bystander parents—whose influence is often limited by economic concerns—are relegated to the sidelines of their daughter’s lives. Finally, paramedic parents—who can come from a wide range of class backgrounds—sit in the middle, intervening in emergencies but otherwise valuing self-sufficiency above all. Analyzing the effects of each of these approaches with clarity and depth, Hamilton ultimately argues that successfully navigating many colleges and universities without involved parents is nearly impossible, and that schools themselves are increasingly dependent on active parents for a wide array of tasks, with intended and unintended consequences. Altogether, Parenting to a Degree offers an incisive look into the new—and sometimes problematic—relationship between students, parents, and universities.

How College Works

Author: Daniel F. Chambliss

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 067472609X

Category: Education

Page: 219

View: 7885

Constrained by shrinking budgets, can colleges do more to improve the quality of education? And can students get more out of college without paying higher tuition? Daniel Chambliss and Christopher Takacs conclude that limited resources need not diminish the undergraduate experience. How College Works reveals the decisive role that personal relationships play in determining a student's success, and puts forward a set of small, inexpensive interventions that yield substantial improvements in educational outcomes. At a liberal arts college in New York, the authors followed nearly one hundred students over eight years. The curricular and technological innovations beloved by administrators mattered much less than did professors and peers, especially early on. At every turning point in undergraduate lives, it was the people, not the programs, that proved critical. Great teachers were more important than the topics studied, and just two or three good friendships made a significant difference academically as well as socially. For most students, college works best when it provides the daily motivation to learn, not just access to information. Improving higher education means focusing on the quality of relationships with mentors and classmates, for when students form the right bonds, they make the most of their education.

Paying the Price

College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream

Author: Sara Goldrick-Rab

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022640448X

Category: Education

Page: 368

View: 9205

If you are a young person, and you work hard enough, you can get a college degree and set yourself on the path to a good life, right? Not necessarily, says Sara Goldrick-Rab, and with Paying the Price, she shows in damning detail exactly why. Quite simply, college is far too expensive for many people today, and the confusing mix of federal, state, institutional, and private financial aid leaves countless students without the resources they need to pay for it. Drawing on an unprecedented study of 3,000 young adults who entered public colleges and universities in Wisconsin in 2008 with the support of federal aid and Pell Grants, Goldrick-Rab reveals the devastating effect of these shortfalls. Half the students in the study left college without a degree, while less than 20 percent finished within five years. The cause of their problems, time and again, was lack of money. Unable to afford tuition, books, and living expenses, they worked too many hours at outside jobs, dropped classes, took time off to save money, and even went without adequate food or housing. In many heartbreaking cases, they simply left school—not with a degree, but with crippling debt. Goldrick-Rab combines that shocking data with devastating stories of six individual students, whose struggles make clear the horrifying human and financial costs of our convoluted financial aid policies. America can fix this problem. In the final section of the book, Goldrick-Rab offers a range of possible solutions, from technical improvements to the financial aid application process, to a bold, public sector–focused “first degree free” program. What’s not an option, this powerful book shows, is doing nothing, and continuing to crush the college dreams of a generation of young people.

Inside the College Gates

How Class and Culture Matter in Higher Education

Author: Jenny M. Stuber

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739149003

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 2431

To date, scholars in higher education have examined the ways in which students' experiences in the classroom and the human capital they attain impact social class inequalities. In this book, Jenny Stuber argues that the experiential core of college life-the social and extra-curricular worlds of higher education-operates as a setting in which social class inequalities manifest and get reproduced. As college students form friendships and get involved in activities like Greek life, study abroad, and student government, they acquire the social and cultural resources that give them access to valuable social and occupational opportunities beyond the college gates. Yet students' social class backgrounds also impact how they experience the experiential core of college life, structuring their abilities to navigate their campus's social and extra-curricular worlds. Stuber shows that upper-middle-class students typically arrive on campus with sophisticated maps and navigational devices to guide their journeys-while working-class students are typically less well equipped for the journey. She demonstrates, as well, that students' social interactions, friendships, and extra-curricular involvements also shape-and are shaped by-their social class worldviews-the ideas they have about their own and others' class identities and their beliefs about where they and others fit within the class system. By focusing on student' social class worldviews, this book provides insight into how identities and consciousness are shaped within educational settings. Ultimately, this examination of what happens inside the college gates shows how which higher education serves as an avenue for social reproduction, while also providing opportunities for the contestation of class inequalities.

Creating a Class

Author: Mitchell L Stevens

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674044037

Category: Education

Page: 318

View: 6472

In real life, Stevens is a professor at Stanford University. But for a year and a half, he worked in the admissions office of a bucolic New England college known for its high academic standards, beautiful campus, and social conscience. Ambitious high schoolers and savvy guidance counselors know that admission here is highly competitive. But creating classes, Stevens finds, is a lot more complicated than most people imagine.

Coming of Age in New Jersey

College and American Culture

Author: Michael Moffatt

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813513591

Category: Education

Page: 355

View: 9132

An anthropologist examines student life, including dormitories, friendships, school bureaucracy, hazing, fraternities, and sexual attitudes

Challenging Racism in Higher Education

Promoting Justice

Author: Mark A. Chesler,Amanda E. Lewis,James E. Crowfoot

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742524576

Category: Education

Page: 333

View: 840

It concludes with many examples of innovative programs that have been implemented to challenge, ameliorate, or reform such discrimination and approach more multicultural and equitable higher educational systems."--Jacket.

Party School

Crime, Campus, and Community

Author: Karen G. Weiss

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1555538193

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 807

Examines the culture of the "party school" and the criminal behaviors that result from it

Lower Ed

The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy

Author: Tressie McMillan Cottom

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 162097472X

Category: Education

Page: N.A

View: 1078

“The best book yet on the complex lives and choices of for-profit students.” —The New York Times Book Review As featured on The Daily Show, NPR’s Marketplace, and Fresh Air, the “powerful, chilling tale” (Carol Anderson, author of White Rage) of higher education becoming an engine of social inequality “p>Lower Ed is quickly becoming the definitive book on the fastest-growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century: for-profit colleges. With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, Tressie McMillan Cottom—a sociologist who was once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges—expertly parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry. Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed details the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of the expansion of for-profit colleges. Now with a new foreword by Stephanie Kelton, economic advisor to Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign, this smart and essential book cuts to the very core of our nation’s broken social contracts and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.

The Road Ahead for America's Colleges and Universities

Author: Robert B. Archibald,David H. Feldman

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190251921

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 1224

The US higher education system is on the verge of a revolution, so some observers claim. Archibald and Feldman, leading analysts, provide an incisive overview of the challenges facing and possibilities for America's universities and colleges in their training future generations. And they demonstrate that our higher education system is resilient and adaptable enough to weather the internal, external, and technological threats without changing campuses beyond recognition. The Road Ahead for America's Colleges and Universities examines the threats posed to the current health of higher education by rising tuition and falling government support, as well as from new digital technologies rippling through the entire economy. Some predict disaster, pointing to high costs, exploding debt, and a digital tsunami that supposedly will combine to disrupt and sweep away many of the nation's higher education institutions, or change them beyond recognition. Archibald and Feldman provide a more nuanced view. They argue that the bundle of services that four-year colleges and universities provide will retain its value for the traditional age range of college students. Less certain, Archibald and Feldman argue, is whether the system will continue to be a force for social and economic opportunity. The threats are most dire at schools that disproportionately serve America's most underprivileged students. At the same time, growing income inequality reduces the ability of many students and their families to pay for higher education. Archibald and Feldman suggest a range of policy options at the state and federal level that will help America's higher education system continue to fulfill its promise.

Forging Gay Identities

Organizing Sexuality in San Francisco, 1950-1994

Author: Elizabeth A. Armstrong

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226026930

Category: Social Science

Page: 272

View: 8793

Unlike many social movements, the gay and lesbian struggle for visibility and rights has succeeded in combining a unified group identity with the celebration of individual differences. Forging Gay Identities explores how this happened, tracing the evolution of gay life and organizations in San Francisco from the 1950s to the mid-1990s.

Choosing Colleges

How Social Class and Schools Structure Opportunity

Author: Patricia M. McDonough

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791434789

Category: Education

Page: 174

View: 1351

Examines the everyday experiences of high school seniors as they choose their colleges and demonstrates that college choice is a more complex social and organizational reality than has been previously understood.

Connecting in College

How Friendship Networks Matter for Academic and Social Success

Author: Janice M. McCabe

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022640952X

Category: Education

Page: 234

View: 6625

Many college students rely on their friends for more than just having fun. But surprisingly, we know very little about what college students friendships look like, or how they might benefit from these friendships, socially and academically, in the short and long term. At a time when only four out of ten students graduate from four-year colleges within four years, understanding friendships may help better assist students and institutions in drawing on friends benefits and avoiding their pitfalls. In this book, sociologist Janice McCabe explores how friendship networks matter for college students lives both during and after college. In doing so, she identifies different types of friendship networksfor instance, the extent to which young people have tight cohesive friendship groups, or move effortlessly through different social circlesand how these networks are associated with social and academic success for students from different race, gender, and class backgrounds. The benefits of friendship are not the same for all friends, and these benefits also are not the same for all students; McCabe finds instead that friendship network type influences how friends matter for students academic and social successes and failures."

Empowering Men of Color on Campus

Building Student Community in Higher Education

Author: Derrick R. Brooms,Jelisa Clark,Matthew Smith

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813594790

Category: Education

Page: 184

View: 9586

While recruitment efforts toward men of color have increased at many colleges and universities, their retention and graduation rates still lag behind those of their white peers. Men of color, particularly black and Latino men, face a number of unique challenges in their educational careers that often impact their presence on campus and inhibit their collegiate success. Empowering Men of Color on Campus examines how men of color negotiate college through their engagement in Brothers for United Success (B4US), an institutionally-based male-centered program at a Hispanic Serving Institution. Derrick R. Brooms, Jelisa Clark, and Matthew Smith introduce the concept of educational agency, which is harbored in cultural wealth and demonstrates how ongoing B4US engagement empowers the men’s efforts and abilities to persist in college. They found that the cultural wealth(s) of the community enhanced the students’ educational agency, which bolstered their academic aspirations, academic and social engagement, and personal development. The authors demonstrate how educational agency and cultural wealth can be developed and refined given salient and meaningful immersions, experiences, engagements, and communal connections.

Degrees of Inequality

How the Politics of Higher Education Sabotaged the American Dream

Author: Suzanne Mettler

Publisher: Basic Books (AZ)

ISBN: 0465044964

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 3254

America’s higher education system is failing its students. In the space of a generation, we have gone from being the best-educated society in the world to one surpassed by eleven other nations in college graduation rates. Higher education is evolving into a caste system with separate and unequal tiers that take in students from different socio-economic backgrounds and leave them more unequal than when they first enrolled. Until the 1970s, the United States had a proud history of promoting higher education for its citizens. The Morrill Act, the G.I. Bill and Pell Grants enabled Americans from across the income spectrum to attend college and the nation led the world in the percentage of young adults with baccalaureate degrees. Yet since 1980, progress has stalled. Young adults from low to middle income families are not much more likely to graduate from college than four decades ago. When less advantaged students do attend, they are largely sequestered into inferior and often profit-driven institutions, from which many emerge without degrees—and shouldering crushing levels of debt. In Degrees of Inequality, acclaimed political scientist Suzanne Mettler explains why the system has gone so horribly wrong and why the American Dream is increasingly out of reach for so many. In her eye-opening account, she illuminates how political partisanship has overshadowed America’s commitment to equal access to higher education. As politicians capitulate to corporate interests, owners of for-profit colleges benefit, but for far too many students, higher education leaves them with little besides crippling student loan debt. Meanwhile, the nation’s public universities have shifted the burden of rising costs onto students. In an era when a college degree is more linked than ever before to individual—and societal—well-being, these pressures conspire to make it increasingly difficult for students to stay in school long enough to graduate. By abandoning their commitment to students, politicians are imperiling our highest ideals as a nation. Degrees of Inequality offers an impassioned call to reform a higher education system that has come to exacerbate, rather than mitigate, socioeconomic inequality in America.

Toward a More Perfect University

Author: Jonathan R. Cole

Publisher: Public Affairs

ISBN: 1610392655

Category: Education

Page: 409

View: 5907

Education has been disrupted dramatically by culture, technology and economics. The only certainty about the universities of the future is that they will not thrive if left unchanged. Jonathan Cole, John Mitchell Mason Professor at Columbia University, and its former provost, is one of the country's leading academic researchers into higher education. A fierce champion of the merits and benefits of the great American research university, Cole identifies the potential fault-lines that threaten the future of universities and the strategic changes that successful colleges will have to make in order to preserve their intellectual relevance, economic viability and social mission. In turn he examines: Admissions policies; Examinations; Cost; Undergraduate education; The role of the humanities The place for professional schools; Research campuses of the future; Sports; Leadership and governance; The intellectual and legal threats to academic freedom. Using his deep knowledge of the history and traditions that underpin US higher education, Cole separates the essential from the fashionable. Higher education is a vital national resource, and an economic proving ground. It is the bedrock of American business and society and it must adapt in order to remain globally competitive and intellectually valuable. The culture of the great American universities reflects the moral and social foundations of the republic itself: they are a litmus test of values and philosophies, and their future affects everyone.