Pauli Murray

The Autobiography of a Black Activist, Feminist, Lawyer, Priest, and Poet

Author: Pauli Murray

Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press

ISBN: 9780870495960

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 451

View: 3331

Dictionary Of Modern American Philosophers

Author: John R. Shook

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1847144705

Category: Philosophy

Page: 2000

View: 9287

The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers includes both academic and non-academic philosophers, and a large number of female and minority thinkers whose work has been neglected. It includes those intellectuals involved in the development of psychology, pedagogy, sociology, anthropology, education, theology, political science, and several other fields, before these disciplines came to be considered distinct from philosophy in the late nineteenth century. Each entry contains a short biography of the writer, an exposition and analysis of his or her doctrines and ideas, a bibliography of writings, and suggestions for further reading. While all the major post-Civil War philosophers are present, the most valuable feature of this dictionary is its coverage of a huge range of less well-known writers, including hundreds of presently obscure thinkers. In many cases, the Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers offers the first scholarly treatment of the life and work of certain writers. This book will be an indispensable reference work for scholars working on almost any aspect of modern American thought.

Southern Selves

From Mark Twain and Eudora Welty to Maya Angelou and Kaye Gibbons--A Collection of Autobiographical Writing

Author: James Watkins

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780307427908

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 1096

The memoirist seek to capture not just a self but an entire world, and in this marvelous anthology thirty-one of the South's finest writers—writers like Kaye Gibbons and Reynolds Price, Eudora Welty and Harry Crews, Richard Wright and Dorothy Allison—make their intensely personal contributions to a vibrant collective picture of southern life. In the hands of these superb artists, the South's rich tradition of storytelling is brilliantly revealed. Whether slave or master, intellectual or "redneck," each voice in this moving and unforgettable collection is proof that southern literature richly deserves its reputation for irreverent humor, exquisite language, a feeling for place, and an undying, often heartbreaking sense of the past. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Shadowed Dreams

Women's Poetry of the Harlem Renaissance

Author: Maureen Honey

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813538866

Category: Poetry

Page: 297

View: 8693

This revised and expanded version of the collection contains twice the number of poems found in the original, many of them never before reprinted, and adds eighteen new female voices from the Harlem Renaissance, once again striking new ground in African American literary history. Also new to this edition are nine period illustrations and updated biographical introductions for each poet. Shadowed Dreams features new poems by Gwendolyn B. Bennett, Anita Scott Coleman, Mae V. Cowdery, Blanche Taylor Dickinson, Alice Dunbar-Nelson, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Angelina Weld Grimké, Gladys May Casely Hayford (a k a Aquah Laluah), Virginia Houston, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Helene Johnson, Effie Lee Newsome, Esther Popel, and Anne Spencer, as well as writings from rediscovered poets Carrie Williams Clifford, Edythe Mae Gordon, Alvira Hazzard, Gertrude Parthenia McBrown, Beatrice M. Murphy, Lucia Mae Pitts, Grace Vera Postles, Ida Rowland, and Lucy Mae Turner, among others.

Women and the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965

Author: Davis W. Houck

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1604737603

Category: History

Page: 351

View: 2422

Presents thirty-nine full-text addresses by women who spoke out while the struggle for civil rights was at its most intense. Many are published or transcribed from audio tape for the first time. Each speech is preceded by an introduction of the speaker and occasion that highlights key biographical and background details. The collection also provides a general introduction that places these public addresses in context.

Breaking the Wave

Women, Their Organizations, and Feminism, 1945-1985

Author: Kathleen A. Laughlin,Jacqueline L. Castledine

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 0415873975

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 7781

"The contributors to this fine volume demonstrate the richness and depth of feminism in the past and provide a useful history for those who pursue feminist goals in the present and future."---Stephanie Gilmore, Assistant Professor and Chair, Women's and Gender Studies, Dickinson College --

American Africans in Ghana

Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era

Author: Kevin K. Gaines

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807867829

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 1147

In 1957 Ghana became one of the first sub-Saharan African nations to gain independence from colonial rule. Over the next decade, hundreds of African Americans--including Martin Luther King Jr., George Padmore, Malcolm X, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Pauli Murray, and Muhammad Ali--visited or settled in Ghana. Kevin K. Gaines explains what attracted these Americans to Ghana and how their new community was shaped by the convergence of the Cold War, the rise of the U.S. civil rights movement, and the decolonization of Africa. Kwame Nkrumah, Ghana's president, posed a direct challenge to U.S. hegemony by promoting a vision of African liberation, continental unity, and West Indian federation. Although the number of African American expatriates in Ghana was small, in espousing a transnational American citizenship defined by solidarities with African peoples, these activists along with their allies in the United States waged a fundamental, if largely forgotten, struggle over the meaning and content of the cornerstone of American citizenship--the right to vote--conferred on African Americans by civil rights reform legislation.

Race Work

The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West

Author: Matthew C. Whitaker

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9780803260276

Category: History

Page: 382

View: 1168

Nearly sixty years ago, Lincoln and Eleanor Ragsdale descended upon the isolated, somewhat desolate, and entirely segregated city of Phoenix, Arizona, in search of freedom and opportunity?a move that would ultimately transform an entire city and, arguably, the nation. Race Work tells the story of this remarkable pair, two of the most influential black activists of the post?World War II American West, and through their story, supplies a missing chapter in the history of the civil rights movement, American race relations, African Americans, and the American West. ø Matthew C. Whitaker explores the Ragsdales? family history and how their familial traditions of entrepreneurship, professionalism, activism, and ?race work? helped form their activist identity and placed them in a position to help desegregate Phoenix. His work, the first sustained account of white supremacy and black resistance in Phoenix, also uses the lives of the Ragsdales to examine themes of domination, resistance, interracial coalition building, race, gender, and place against the backdrop of the civil rights and post?civil rights eras. An absorbing biography that provides insight into African Americans? quest for freedom, Race Work reveals the lives of the Ragsdales as powerful symbols of black leadership who illuminate the problems and progress in African American history, American Western history, and American history during the post?World War II era.

The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939

Author: Robert L Harris Jr.,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 023151087X

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 2654

This book is a multifaceted approach to understanding the central developments in African American history since 1939. It combines a historical overview of key personalities and movements with essays by leading scholars on specific facets of the African American experience, a chronology of events, and a guide to further study. Marian Anderson's famous 1939 concert in front of the Lincoln Memorial was a watershed moment in the struggle for racial justice. Beginning with this event, the editors chart the historical efforts of African Americans to address racism and inequality. They explore the rise of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements and the national and international contexts that shaped their ideologies and methods; consider how changes in immigration patterns have complicated the conventional "black/white" dichotomy in U.S. society; discuss the often uneasy coexistence between a growing African American middle class and a persistent and sizable underclass; and address the complexity of the contemporary African American experience. Contributors consider specific issues in African American life, including the effects of the postindustrial economy and the influence of music, military service, sports, literature, culture, business, and the politics of self-designation, e.g.,"Colored" vs. "Negro," "Black" vs. "African American". While emphasizing political and social developments, this volume also illuminates important economic, military, and cultural themes. An invaluable resource, The Columbia Guide to African American History Since 1939 provides a thorough understanding of a crucial historical period.

Song in a Weary Throat: Memoir of an American Pilgrimage

Author: Pauli Murray

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 1631494597

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 544

View: 9465

A prophetic memoir by the activist who “articulated the intellectual foundations” (The New Yorker) of the civil rights and women’s rights movements. First published posthumously in 1987, Pauli Murray’s Song in a Weary Throat was critically lauded, winning the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award and the Lillian Smith Book Award among other distinctions. Yet Murray’s name and extraordinary influence receded from view in the intervening years; now they are once again entering the public discourse. At last, with the republication of this “beautifully crafted” memoir, Song in a Weary Throat takes its rightful place among the great civil rights autobiographies of the twentieth century. In a voice that is energetic, wry, and direct, Murray tells of a childhood dramatically altered by the sudden loss of her spirited, hard-working parents. Orphaned at age four, she was sent from Baltimore to segregated Durham, North Carolina, to live with her unflappable Aunt Pauline, who, while strict, was liberal-minded in accepting the tomboy Pauli as “my little boy-girl.” In fact, throughout her life, Murray would struggle with feelings of sexual “in-betweenness”—she tried unsuccessfully to get her doctors to give her testosterone—that today we would recognize as a transgendered identity. We then follow Murray north at the age of seventeen to New York City’s Hunter College, to her embrace of Gandhi’s Satyagraha—nonviolent resistance—and south again, where she experienced Jim Crow firsthand. An early Freedom Rider, she was arrested in 1940, fifteen years before Rosa Parks’ disobedience, for sitting in the whites-only section of a Virginia bus. Murray’s activism led to relationships with Thurgood Marshall and Eleanor Roosevelt—who respectfully referred to Murray as a “firebrand”—and propelled her to a Howard University law degree and a lifelong fight against "Jane Crow" sexism. We also read Betty Friedan’s enthusiastic response to Murray’s call for an NAACP for Women—the origins of NOW. Murray sets these thrilling high-water marks against the backdrop of uncertain finances, chronic fatigue, and tragic losses both private and public, as Patricia Bell-Scott’s engaging introduction brings to life. Now, more than thirty years after her death in 1985, Murray—poet, memoirist, lawyer, activist, and Episcopal priest—gains long-deserved recognition through a rediscovered memoir that serves as a “powerful witness” (Brittney Cooper) to a pivotal era in the American twentieth century.

World Order

A Bahai Magazine

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Bahai Faith

Page: N.A

View: 8202

Freedom's Teacher, Enhanced Ebook

The Life of Septima Clark

Author: Katherine Mellen Charron

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807837601

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 480

View: 2443

Civil rights activist Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987) developed a citizenship education program that enabled tens of thousands of African Americans to register to vote and to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. Clark, who began her own teaching career in 1916, grounded her approach in the philosophy and practice of southern black activist educators in the decades leading up to the 1950s and 1960s, and then trained a committed cadre of grassroots black women to lead this literacy revolution in community stores, beauty shops, and churches throughout the South. In this engaging biography, Katherine Charron tells the story of Clark, from her coming of age in the South Carolina lowcountry to her activism with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the movement's heyday. The enhanced electronic version of the book draws from archives, libraries, and the author's personal collection and includes nearly 100 letters, documents, photographs, newspaper articles, and interview excerpts, embedding each in the text where it will be most meaningful. Featuring more than 60 audio clips (more than 2.5 hours total) from oral history interviews with 15 individuals, including Clark herself, the enhanced e-book redefines the idea of the "talking book." Watch the video below to see a demonstration of the enhanced ebook:

Stolen Childhood, Second Edition

Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America

Author: Wilma King

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253001072

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 4362

One of the most important books published on slave society, Stolen Childhood focuses on the millions of children and youth enslaved in 19th-century America. This enlarged and revised edition reflects the abundance of new scholarship on slavery that has emerged in the 15 years since the first edition. While the structure of the book remains the same, Wilma King has expanded its scope to include the international dimension with a new chapter on the transatlantic trade in African children, and the book’s geographic boundaries now embrace slave-born children in the North. She includes data about children owned by Native Americans and African Americans, and presents new information about children’s knowledge of and participation in the abolitionist movement and the interactions between enslaved and free children.

The Dream Is Freedom

Pauli Murray and American Democratic Faith

Author: Sarah Azaransky

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199744815

Category: Political Science

Page: 166

View: 2038

An introduction to Pauli Murray - poet, lawyer, trailblazing civil rights and feminist activist, and priest - as a significant twentieth century African American intellectual who grounded her calls for democratic transformation in Christian concepts of reconciliation and the coming kingdom.

Pauli Murray

Selected Sermons and Writings

Author: Pauli Murray

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781570756467

Category: Religion

Page: 245

View: 3809

Pauli Murray was a bold thinker whose passion for racial justice, equality, and freedom was rooted in a deep and sustaining religious life. A pioneer throughout her life, she was an early activist in the civil rights movement; a professor of law at Brandeis, a poet and author of two acclaimed memoirs, a cofounder of the National Organization of Women; and finally at age 66, the first African-America woman ordained in the Episcopal Church.

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Literature: I-N

Author: Hans A. Ostrom,J. David Macey

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780313329753

Category: African Americans

Page: 2010

View: 7129

Designed to meet the needs of high school students, undergraduates, and general readers, this encyclopedia is the most comprehensive reference available on African American literature from its origins to the present. Other works include many brief entries, or offer extended biographical sketches of a limited selection of writers. This encyclopedia surpasses existing references by offering full and current coverage of a vast range of authors and topics. While most of the entries are on individual authors, the encyclopedia gathers together information about the genres and geographical and cultural environments in which these writers have worked, and the social, political, and aesthetic movements in which they have participated. Thus the encyclopedia gives special attention to the historical and cultural forces that have shaped African American writing. - Publisher.

Encyclopedia of African-American culture and history

the Black experience in the Americas

Author: Colin A. Palmer,Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Publisher: MacMillan Reference Library

ISBN: 9780028658209

Category: History

Page: 2746

View: 7872

Contains primary source material.

Contemporary Authors

A Bio-Bibilographical Guide to Current Writers in Fiction, General Nonfiction, Poetry, Journalism, Drama, Motion Pictures, Television, and Other Field

Author: Pamela Dear

Publisher: Gale Cengage

ISBN: 9780787632106

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 475

View: 2405

This volume of Contemporary Authors® New Revision Series brings you up-to-date information on approximately 250 writers. Editors have scoured dozens of leading journals, magazines, newspapers and online sources in search of the latest news and criticism.