Rhetoric in Tooth and Claw

Animals, Language, Sensation

Author: Debra Hawhee

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 248

View: 759

For centuries, since its inception in fact, rhetoric has been conceived of as an exclusively human art. Only humans, after all, could artfully use language, the very definition of rhetoric. And yet pre- and early-modern treatises about rhetoric are crawling with animals of the nonhuman variety. This work examines the enduring presence of nonhuman animals in rhetorical theory and rhetorical education.

Parts of Animals

Author: Aristotle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Animal locomotion

Page: 555

View: 884

The Naming of Names

The Search for Order in the World of Plants

Author: Anna Pavord

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 471

View: 172

Presents the history of how plants were grouped, ordered, and named for both pharmaceutical and practical purposes to make sense of the natural world.

Spectral Nationality

Passages of Freedom from Kant to Postcolonial Literatures of Liberation

Author: Pheng Cheah

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 432

View: 274

This far-ranging and ambitious attempt to rethink postcolonial theory's discussion of the nation and nationalism brings the problems of the postcolonial condition to bear on the philosophy of freedom. Closely identified with totalitarianism and fundamentalism, the nation-state has a tainted history of coercion, ethnic violence, and even, as in ultranationalist Nazi Germany, genocide. Most contemporary theorists are therefore skeptical, if not altogether dismissive, of the idea of the nation and the related metaphor of the political body as an organism. Going against orthodoxy, Pheng Cheah retraces the universal-rationalist foundations and progressive origins of political organicism in the work of Kant and its development in philosophers in the German tradition such as Fichte, Hegel, and Marx. Cheah argues that the widespread association of freedom with the self-generating dynamism of life and culture's power of transcendence is the most important legacy of this tradition. Addressing this legacy's manifestations in Fanon and Cabral's theories of anticolonial struggle and contemporary anticolonial literature, including the Buru Quartet by Indonesian writer Pramoedya Ananta Toer, and the Kenyan writer Ngugi Wa Thiong'o's nationalist novels, Cheah suggests that the profound difficulties of achieving freedom in the postcolonial world indicate the need to reconceptualize freedom in terms of the figure of the specter rather than the living organism.

On Animals

Volume I: Systematic Theology

Author: David L. Clough

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 240

View: 708

This volume is a project in systematic theology: a rigorous engagement with the Christian tradition in relation to animals under the doctrinal headings of creation, reconciliation and redemption and in dialogue with the Bible and theological voices central to the tradition. The book shows that such engagement with the tradition with the question of the animal in mind produces surprising answers that challenge modern anthropocentric assumptions. For the most part, therefore, the novelty of the project lies in the questions raised, rather than the proposal of innovative answers to it. The transformation in our thinking about animals for which the book argues results in the main from looking squarely for the first time at the sum of what we are already committed to believing about other animals and their place in God's creation.

Knowledge, Nature, and the Good

Essays on Ancient Philosophy

Author: John M. Cooper

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 400

View: 102

Knowledge, Nature, and the Good brings together some of John Cooper's most important works on ancient philosophy. In thirteen chapters that represent an ideal companion to the author's influential Reason and Emotion, Cooper addresses a wide range of topics and periods--from Hippocratic medical theory and Plato's epistemology and moral philosophy, to Aristotle's physics and metaphysics, academic scepticism, and the cosmology, moral psychology, and ethical theory of the ancient Stoics. Almost half of the pieces appear here for the first time or are presented in newly expanded, extensively revised versions. Many stand at the cutting edge of research into ancient ethics and moral psychology. Other chapters, dating from as far back as 1970, are classics of philosophical scholarship on antiquity that continue to play a prominent role in current teaching and scholarship in the field. All of the chapters are distinctive for the way that, whatever the particular topic being pursued, they attempt to understand the ancient philosophers' views in philosophical terms drawn from the ancient philosophical tradition itself (rather than from contemporary philosophy). Through engaging creatively and philosophically with the ancient texts, these essays aim to make ancient philosophical perspectives freshly available to contemporary philosophers and philosophy students, in all their fascinating inventiveness, originality, and deep philosophical merit. This book will be treasured by philosophers, classicists, students of philosophy and classics, those in other disciplines with an interest in ancient philosophy, and anyone who seeks to understand philosophy in philosophical terms.