The Archaeology of La Calsada

A Rockshelter in the Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico

Author: C. Roger Nance

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292786182

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 4197

On a remote mountainside 2,000 meters above sea level in the northern Sierra Madre Oriental, the rockshelter at La Calsada has yielded basic archaeological data for one of the least understood regions of prehistoric North America, the state of Nuevo León in northern Mexico. This comprehensive site report, with detailed information on artifacts and stratigraphy, provides baseline data for further explorations in the region and comparisons with other North American hunter-gatherer groups. Radiocarbon dating traces the earliest component at the site to 8600-7500 B.C., giving La Calsada arguably the earliest well-dated lithic complex in Mexico. Nance describes some 1,140 recovered stone tools, with comparisons to the archaeology of southern and southwestern Texas, as well as reported sites in Tamaulipas, Coahuila, and Nuevo León, Mexico. From the lithic and stratigraphic analysis, Nance deduces occupational patterns at the site, beginning with Paleo-Indian cultures that lived in the area until about 7500 B.C. Through changes in tool technology, he follows the rise of the Abasolo tradition around 3000 B.C. and the appearance of a new culture with a radically different lithic industry around 1000 A.D.

From the Pleistocene to the Holocene

Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America

Author: C. Britt Bousman,Bradley J. Vierra

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN: 1603447784

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 3714

The end of the Pleistocene era brought dramatic environmental changes to small bands of humans living in North America: changes that affected subsistence, mobility, demography, technology, and social relations. The transition they made from Paleoindian (Pleistocene) to Archaic (Early Holocene) societies represents the first major cultural shift that took place solely in the Americas. This event—which manifested in ways and at times much more varied than often supposed—set the stage for the unique developments of behavioral complexity that distinguish later Native American prehistoric societies. Using localized studies and broad regional syntheses, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the diversity of adaptations to the dynamic and changing environmental and cultural landscapes that occurred between the Pleistocene and early portion of the Holocene. The authors' research areas range from Northern Mexico to Alaska and across the continent to the American Northeast, synthesizing the copious available evidence from well-known and recent excavations.With its methodologically and geographically diverse approach, From the Pleistocene to the Holocene: Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America provides an overview of the present state of knowledge regarding this crucial transformative period in Native North America. It offers a large-scale synthesis of human adaptation, reflects the range of ideas and concepts in current archaeological theoretical approaches, and acts as a springboard for future explanations and models of prehistoric change.

Boundary Lands

Archaeological Investigations Along the California-Great Basin Interface

Author: Kelly R. McGuire

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: California

Page: 134

View: 615

The Great Basin

A Natural Prehistory

Author: Donald Grayson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520267478

Category: Nature

Page: 418

View: 9601

"The Great Basin, centering on Nevada and including substantial parts of California, Oregon, and Utah, gets its name from the fact that none of its rivers or streams flow to the sea. This book synthesizes the past 25,000 years of the natural history of this vast region. It explores the extinct animals that lived in the Great Basin during the Ice Age and recounts the rise and fall of the massive Ice Age lakes that existed here. It explains why trees once grew 13' beneath what is now the surface of Lake Tahoe, explores the nearly two dozen Great Basin mountain ranges that once held substantial glaciers, and tells the remarkable story of how pinyon pine came to cover some 17,000,000 acres of the Great Basin in the relatively recent past.These discussions culminate with the impressive history of the prehistoric people of the Great Basin, a history that shows how human societies dealt with nearly 13,000 years of climate change on this often-challenging landscape"--Provided by publisher.

California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones,Kathryn A. Klar

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759113742

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 1497

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

Beyond Foraging and Collecting

Evolutionary Change in Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems

Author: Ben Fitzhugh,Junko Habu

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 1461505437

Category: Social Science

Page: 442

View: 5891

This volume includes new research on the theoretical implications regarding the mechanisms of change in the geographical distribution of hunter-gatherer settlement and land use. It focuses on the long-term changes in the hunter-gatherer settlement on a global scale, including research from several continents. It will be of interest to archaeologists and cultural anthropologists working in the field of the forager/ collector model throughout the world.

John Wesley Powell

An Annotated Bibliography

Author: Marcia L. Thomas

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313319426

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2948

This bibliography provides citations and annotations for the works by and about John Wesley Powell.

Encyclopedia of Prehistory

Volume 6: North America

Author: Peter N. Peregrine,Melvin Ember

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780306462603

Category: Social Science

Page: 509

View: 8951

The Encyclopedia of Prehistory represents temporal dimension. Major traditions are an attempt to provide basic information also defined by a somewhat different set of on all archaeologically known cultures, sociocultural characteristics than are eth covering the entire globe and the entire nological cultures. Major traditions are prehistory of humankind. It is designed as defined based on common subsistence a tool to assist in doing comparative practices, sociopolitical organization, and research on the peoples of the past. Most material industries, but language, ideology, of the entries are written by the world's and kinship ties play little or no part in foremost experts on the particular areas their definition because they are virtually and time periods. unrecoverable from archaeological con The Encyclopedia is organized accord texts. In contrast, language, ideology, and ing to major traditions. A major tradition kinship ties are central to defining ethno is defined as a group of populations sharing logical cultures.

Archaeology in the Great Basin and Southwest

Papers in Honor of Don D. Fowler

Author: Nancy J. Parezo,Joel C. Janetski

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781607812838

Category: Social Science

Page: 342

View: 9499

An extensive overview of the past, present, and future of archaeology in the Great Basin and Southwest

Perspectives on Prehistoric Trade and Exchange in California and the Great Basin

Author: Richard E. Hughes

Publisher: University of Utah Press

ISBN: 1607812002

Category: HISTORY

Page: 292

View: 1885

This volume investigates the circumstances and conditions under which trade/exchange, direct access, and/or mobility best account for material conveyance across varying distances at different times in the past.

The Way the Wind Blows

Climate Change, History, and Human Action

Author: Roderick J. McIntosh,Joseph A. Tainter,Susan Keech McIntosh

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505787

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 8363

Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference. Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

Violence and Warfare Among Hunter-Gatherers

Author: Mark W Allen,Terry L Jones

Publisher: Left Coast Press

ISBN: 1611329396

Category: Social Science

Page: 391

View: 4205

The original chapters in this volume examine cultural areas on five continents where there is archaeological, ethnographic, and historical evidence for hunter-gatherer conflict despite high degrees of mobility, small populations, and relatively egalitarian social structures.

Alberta Formed, Alberta Transformed

Author: Catherine Anne Cavanaugh,Michael Payne,Donald Grant Wetherell

Publisher: University of Alberta

ISBN: 9781552381946

Category: Alberta

Page: 808

View: 613

Alberta is distinctive both for its awe-inspiring natural wonders and its fascinating history, and from the earliest footprints of human settlement to today's dynamic society, Alberta has captivated countless generations who have visited or settled in this remarkable province. To celebrate Alberta's centennial in 2005, this two-volume edition features thirty eminent historians contributing articles spanning an incredible 12,000 years of history encompassing the archaeological foundations, the natural resources, and the social and political development of the province. From the primordial to the present, Alberta Formed--Alberta Transformed is the definitive record of the people, places, and events that have defined our province and made Alberta one of the most vibrant areas of the country--and the world.

The Mormon Quest for Glory

The Religious World of the Latter-day Saints

Author: Melvyn Hammarberg

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911134

Category: Religion

Page: 392

View: 9622

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has 6 million members in the United States today (and 13 million worldwide). Yet, while there has been extensive study of Mormon history, comparatively little scholarly attention has been paid to contemporary Mormons. The best sociological study of Mormon life, Thomas O'Dea's The Mormons, is now over fifty years old. What is it like to be a Mormon in America today? Melvyn Hammarberg attempts to answer this question by offering an ethnography of contemporary Mormons. In The Mormon Quest for Glory, Hammarberg examines Mormon history, rituals, social organization, family connections, gender roles, artistic traditions, use of media, and missionary work. He writes as a sympathetic outsider who has studied Mormon life for decades, and strives to explain the religious world of the Latter-day Saints through the lens of their own spiritual understanding. Drawing on a survey, participant observation, interviews, focus groups, attendance at religious gatherings, diaries, church periodicals, lesson manuals, and other church literature, Hammarberg aims to present a comprehensive picture of the religious world of the Latter-day Saints.

Refuge

An Unnatural History of Family and Place

Author: Terry Tempest Williams

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 030777273X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 2563

In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781607320234

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 5148

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology is a guide for the design of archaeological experiments for both students and scholars. Experimental archaeology provides a unique opportunity to corroborate conclusions with multiple trials of repeatable experiments and can provide data otherwise unavailable to archaeologists without damaging sites, remains, or artifacts. Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture-ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology-detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures and are placed in a theoretical context, and contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. The field has long been in need of a guide that focuses on methodology and design. This book fills that need not only for undergraduate and graduate students but for any archaeologist looking to begin an experimental research project.

Wetland Adaptations in the Great Basin

Papers from the Twenty-first Great Basin Anthopological [sic] Conference

Author: Joel C. Janetski,David B. Madsen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Excavations (Archaeology)

Page: 285

View: 9139

Horse Nations

The Worldwide Impact of the Horse on Indigenous Societies Post-1492

Author: Peter Mitchell

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191008826

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 9762

The Native American on a horse is an archetypal Hollywood image, but though such equestrian-focused societies were a relatively short-lived consequence of European expansion overseas, they were not restricted to North America's Plains. Horse Nations provides the first wide-ranging and up-to-date synthesis of the impact of the horse on the Indigenous societies of North and South America, southern Africa, and Australasia following its introduction as a result of European contact post-1492. Drawing on sources in a variety of languages and on the evidence of archaeology, anthropology, and history, the volume outlines the transformations that the acquisition of the horse wrought on a diverse range of groups within these four continents. It explores key topics such as changes in subsistence, technology, and belief systems, the horse's role in facilitating the emergence of more hierarchical social formations, and the interplay between ecology, climate, and human action in adopting the horse, as well as considering how far equestrian lifestyles were ultimately unsustainable.