Pagans in the Promised Land

Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

Author: Steven T. Newcomb

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 186

View: 184

An analysis of how religious bias shaped U.S. federal Indian law.

Pagans in the Promised Land

Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

Author: Steven T. Newcomb

Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 186

View: 921

An analysis of how religious bias shaped U.S. federal Indian law.

Pagans in the Promised Land

Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

Author: Steven T. Newcomb

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 368

View: 253

Pagans in the Promised Land provides a unique, well-researched challenge to U.S. federal Indian law and policy. It attacks the presumption that American Indian nations are legitimately subject to the plenary power of the United States. Steve Newcomb puts forth a startling theory that U.S. federal Indian law and policy are premised on Old Testament narratives of the chosen people and the promised land, as exemplified in the 1823 Supreme Court ruling Johnson v. McIntosh, that the first ''Christian people'' to ''discover'' lands inhabited by ''natives, who were heathens, '' have an ultimate title to and dominion over these lands and peoples. This imporant addition to legal scholarship asserts there is no separation of church and state in the United States, so long as U.S. federal Indian law and policy are premised on the ancient religious distinctions between ''Christians'' and ''heathens.''

Remembering Jamestown

Hard Questions About Christian Mission

Author: Amos Yong

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 186

View: 886

For many Americans, Christian missionary efforts have usually involved distant and exotic places. Sometimes, however, we can learn more about missions and interreligious engagement by looking in our own backyard. This collection of essays deriving from a consultation on missionary history and attitudes in colonial Jamestown, Virginia, explores long-standing assumptions related to Christian mission by listening to Native American voices. What were the ideologies and theologies that motivated early Virginia colonists? How did certain understandings of mission and church provide support and legitimacy for invasion and exploitation? What were, and are, the responses of indigenous populations, and how should Christian mission to Native Americans continue in light of this history? This book addresses these still very relevant questions and explores ways in which new understandings of Christian mission are needed in the expanding religious and cultural diversity of the twenty-first century. Contents Acknowledgments / vii Introduction: Using Jamestown in 1607 to Stimulate Questions about Christian Mission in 2007-- Barbara Brown Zikmund / 1 Part One: Re-Visiting Native-American Beliefs and Practices Chapter 1: The Romance and Tragedy of Christian Mission among American Indians -- Tink Tinker / 13 Chapter 2: A Failure to Communicate: How Christian Missionary Assumptions Ignore Binary Patterns of Thinking within Native-American Communities -- Barbara Alice Mann / 29 Part Two: Re-Discovering the Concept of Discovery in the Christian Mission to Native America Chapter 3: Christianity, American Indians, and the Doctrine of Discovery -- Robert J. Miller / 51 Chapter 4: Colonial Virginia Mission Attitudes toward Native Peoples and African-American Slaves -- Edward L. Bond / 69 Part Three: Re-Engaging the Christian Mission to Native America Chapter 5: Living in Transition, Embracing Community, and Envisioning God's Mission as Trinitarian Mutuality: Reflections from a Native-American Follower of Jesus -- Richard Twiss / 93 Chapter 6: Salvation History and the Mission of God: Implications for the Mission of the Church among Native Americans -- Richard E. Waldrop and J. L. Corky Alexander Jr. / 109 Part Four: Re-Thinking Theology of Mission in a Multifaith World Chapter 7: Jamestown and the Future of Mission: Mending Creation and Claiming Full Humanity in Interreligious Partnership -- Shanta Premawardhana / 127 Chapter 8: Moving beyond Christian Imperialism to Mission as Reconciliation with all Creation -- William R. Burrows / 145 Conclusion: The Missiology of Jamestown -- 1607--2007 and Beyond: Toward a Postcolonial Theology of Mission in North America -- Amos Yong / 157 Contributors / 169 Author Index / 171 Subject Index / 175 .embed-container { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; height: 0; overflow: hidden; max-width: 100%; } .embed-container iframe, .embed-container object, .embed-container embed { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%; }

Conquest by Law

How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands

Author: Lindsay G. Robertson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 823

In 1823, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a Supreme Court decision of monumental importance in defining the rights of indigenous peoples throughout the English-speaking world. At the heart of the decision for Johnson v. M'Intosh was a "discovery doctrine" that gave rights of ownership to the European sovereigns who "discovered" the land and converted the indigenous owners into tenants. Though its meaning and intention has been fiercely disputed, more than 175 years later, this doctrine remains the law of the land. In 1991, while investigating the discovery doctrine's historical origins Lindsay Robertson made a startling find; in the basement of a Pennsylvania furniture-maker, he discovered a trunk with the complete corporate records of the Illinois and Wabash Land Companies, the plaintiffs in Johnson v. M'Intosh. Conquest by Law provides, for the first time, the complete and troubling account of the European "discovery" of the Americas. This is a gripping tale of political collusion, detailing how a spurious claim gave rise to a doctrine--intended to be of limited application--which itself gave rise to a massive displacement of persons and the creation of a law that governs indigenous people and their lands to this day.

Religion, the Secular, and the Politics of Sexual Difference

Author: Linell E. Cady

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 344

View: 519

Global struggles over women's roles, rights, and dress increasingly cast the secular and the religious in tense if not violent opposition. When advocates for equality speak in terms of rights and modern progress, or reactionaries ground their authority in religious and scriptural appeals, both tend to presume women's emancipation is ineluctably tied to secularization. Religion, the Secular, and the Politics of Sexual Difference upsets this certainty by drawing on diverse voices and traditions in studies that historicize, question, and test the implicit links between secularism and expanded freedoms for women. Rather than position secularism as the answer to conflicts over gender and sexuality, this volume shows both religion and the secular collaborate in creating the conditions that generate them.

Encountering ETI

Aliens in Avatar and the Americas

Author: John Hart

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 306

View: 874

Encountering ETI weaves together scientific knowledge and spiritual faith in a cosmic context. It explores consequences of Contact between terrestrial intelligent life (TI) and extraterrestrial intelligent life (ETI). Humans will face cosmic displacement if there are other complex, technologically advanced intelligent beings in the universe; our economic structures and religious beliefs might need substantial revision. On Earth or in space, humans could encounter benevolent ETI (solicitous of our striving for maturity as a species) or malevolent ETI (seeking our land and goods to benefit themselves, claiming that their "superior civilization" gives them the right)--or meet both types of species. Earth Encounters of the Third Kind described by credible witnesses (including American Indian elders) suggest that both have arrived already: some shut down U.S. and U.S.S.R. ICBM missiles to promote peace; others mutilated cattle or abducted people, perhaps to acquire physiological data on biota for scientific study or for other, unknown purposes. Sci-fi movies such as Avatar and novels like The Martian Chronicles describe humans as malevolent ETI aliens: we do to others what we fear others will do to us. A shared and evolving spiritual materiality could enable humanity to overcome cosmic displacement, and guide TI and ETI in a common quest for meaning and wellbeing on cosmic common ground.

Discovering Indigenous Lands

The Doctrine of Discovery in the English Colonies

Author: Robert J. Miller

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 320

View: 624

This book presents new material and shines fresh light on the under-explored historical and legal evidence about the use of the doctrine of discovery in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States. North America, New Zealand and Australia were colonised by England under an international legal principle that is known today as the doctrine of discovery. When Europeans set out to explore and exploit new lands in the fifteenth through to the twentieth centuries, they justified their sovereign and property claims over these territories and the indigenous peoples with the discovery doctrine. This legal principle was justified by religious and ethnocentric ideas of European and Christian superiority over the other cultures, religions, and races of the world. The doctrine provided that newly-arrived Europeans automatically acquired property rights in the lands of indigenous peoples and gained political and commercial rights over the inhabitants. The English colonial governments and colonists in North America, New Zealand and Australia all utilised this doctrine, and still use it today to assert legal rights to indigenous lands and to assert control over indigenous peoples. Written by indigenous legal academics - an American Indian from the Eastern Shawnee Tribe, a New Zealand Maori (Ngati Rawkawa and Ngai Te Rangi), an Indigenous Australian, and a Cree (Neheyiwak) in the country now known as Canada, Discovering Indigenous Lands provides a unique insight into the insidious historical and contemporary application of the doctrine of discovery.

After Pluralism

Reimagining Religious Engagement

Author: Courtney Bender

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 416

View: 242

The contributors to this volume treat pluralism as a concept that is historically and ideologically produced or, put another way, as a doctrine that is embedded within a range of political, civic, and cultural institutions. Their critique considers how religious difference is framed as a problem that only pluralism can solve. Working comparatively across nations and disciplines, the essays in After Pluralism explore pluralism as a "term of art" that sets the norms of identity and the parameters of exchange, encounter, and conflict. Contributors locate pluralism's ideals in diverse sites Broadway plays, Polish Holocaust memorials, Egyptian dream interpretations, German jails, and legal theories and demonstrate its shaping of political and social interaction in surprising and powerful ways. Throughout, they question assumptions underlying pluralism's discourse and its influence on the legal decisions that shape modern religious practice. Contributors do more than deconstruct this theory; they tackle what comes next. Having established the genealogy and effects of pluralism, they generate new questions for engaging the collective worlds and multiple registers in which religion operates.