Narratives in Motion

Journalism and Modernist Events in 1920s Portugal

Author: Luís Trindade

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785331043

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 2754

Interwar Portugal was in many ways a microcosm of Europe's encounter with modernity: reshaped by industrialization, urban growth, and the antagonism between liberalism and authoritarianism, it also witnessed new forms of media and mass culture that transformed daily life. This fascinating study of newspapers in 1920s Portugal explores how the new "modernist reportage" embodied the spirit of the era while mediating some of its most spectacular episodes, from political upheavals to lurid crimes of passion. In the process, Luís Trindade illuminates the twofold nature of that journalism-both historical account and material object, it epitomized a distinctly modern entanglement of narrative and event.

Silence, Screen, and Spectacle

Rethinking Social Memory in the Age of Information

Author: Lindsey A. Freeman,Benjamin Nienass,Rachel Daniell

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 178238281X

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 9995

In an age of information and new media the relationships between remembering and forgetting have changed. This volume addresses the tension between loud and often spectacular histories and those forgotten pasts we strain to hear. Employing social and cultural analysis, the essays within examine mnemonic technologies both new and old, and cover subjects as diverse as U.S. internment camps for Japanese Americans in WWII, the Canadian Indian Residential School system, Israeli memorial videos, and the desaparecidos in Argentina. Through these cases, the contributors argue for a re-interpretation of Guy Debord's notion of the spectacle as a conceptual apparatus through which to examine the contemporary landscape of social memory, arguing that the concept of spectacle might be developed in an age seen as dissatisfied with the present, nervous about the future, and obsessed with the past. Perhaps now "spectacle" can be thought of not as a tool of distraction employed solely by hegemonic powers, but instead as a device used to answer Walter Benjamin's plea to "explode the continuum of history" and bring our attention to now-time.

Petticoat Heroes

Gender, Culture and Popular Protest in the Rebecca Riots

Author: Rhian E. Jones

Publisher: University of Wales Press

ISBN: 1783167904

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 3400

The wave of unrest which took place in 1840s Wales, known as ‘Rebeccaism’ or ‘the Rebecca riots’, stands out as a success story within the generally gloomy annals of popular struggle and defeat. The story is remembered in vivid and compelling images: attacks on tollgates and other symbols of perceived injustice by farmers and workers, outlandishly dressed in bonnets and petticoats and led by the iconic anonymous figure of Rebecca herself. The events form a core part of historical study and remembrance in Wales, and frequently appear in broader work on British radicalism and Victorian protest movements. This book draws on cultural history, gender studies and symbolic anthropology to present fresh and alternative arguments on the meaning of Rebeccaite costume and ritual; the significance of the feminine in protest; the links between protest and popular culture; the use of Rebecca’s image in Victorian press and political discourse; and the ways in which the events and the image of Rebecca herself were integrated into politics, culture and popular memory in Wales and beyond. All these aspects repay greater consideration than they have yet been accorded, and highlight the relevance of Rebeccaism to British and European popular protest – up to and including the present day.

Performing Women and Modern Literary Culture in Latin America

Intervening Acts

Author: Vicky Unruh

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292773749

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 3200

Women have always been the muses who inspire the creativity of men, but how do women become the creators of art themselves? This was the challenge faced by Latin American women who aspired to write in the 1920s and 1930s. Though women's roles were opening up during this time, women writers were not automatically welcomed by the Latin American literary avant-gardes, whose male members viewed women's participation in tertulias (literary gatherings) and publications as uncommon and even forbidding. How did Latin American women writers, celebrated by male writers as the "New Eve" but distrusted as fellow creators, find their intellectual homes and fashion their artistic missions? In this innovative book, Vicky Unruh explores how women writers of the vanguard period often gained access to literary life as public performers. Using a novel, interdisciplinary synthesis of performance theory, she shows how Latin American women's work in theatre, poetry declamation, song, dance, oration, witty display, and bold journalistic self-portraiture helped them craft their public personas as writers and shaped their singular forms of analytical thought, cultural critique, and literary style. Concentrating on eleven writers from Argentina, Brazil, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela, Unruh demonstrates that, as these women identified themselves as instigators of change rather than as passive muses, they unleashed penetrating critiques of projects for social and artistic modernization in Latin America.

Wonder and Science

Imagining Worlds in Early Modern Europe

Author: Mary Blaine Campbell

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 1501705059

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 922

During the early modern period, western Europe was transformed by the proliferation of new worlds—geographic worlds found in the voyages of discovery and conceptual and celestial worlds opened by natural philosophy, or science. The response to incredible overseas encounters and to the profound technological, religious, economic, and intellectual changes occurring in Europe was one of nearly overwhelming wonder, expressed in a rich variety of texts. In the need to manage this wonder, to harness this imaginative overabundance, Mary Baine Campbell finds both the sensational beauty of early scientific works and the beginnings of the divergence of the sciences—particularly geography, astronomy, and anthropology—from the writing of fiction. Campbell's learned and brilliantly perceptive new book analyzes a cross section of texts in which worlds were made and unmade; these texts include cosmographies, colonial reports, works of natural philosophy and natural history, fantastic voyages, exotic fictions, and confessions. Among the authors she discusses are André Thevet, Thomas Hariot, Francis Bacon, Galileo, Margaret Cavendish, and Aphra Behn. Campbell's emphasis is on developments in England and France, but she considers works in languages other than English or French which were well known in the polyglot book culture of the time. With over thirty well-chosen illustrations, Wonder and Science enhances our understanding of the culture of early modern Europe, the history of science, and the development of literary forms, including the novel and ethnography.

Content is King

News Media Management in the Digital Age

Author: Gary Graham,Debashis Aikat,Anita Greenhill,Donald Shaw,Chris J. Vargo

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1623565456

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 256

View: 6107

Examines the media industry in an age of disruption, due to advances in digital technology, politically traded organizations and changing media tastes and values.

The Making of Modern Portugal

Author: Luís Trindade

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443853690

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 2189

This book can be read in two different ways: as an introductory synthesis on Modern Portugal, or as a collection of twelve studies focusing on familiar aspects of the State formation of any modern nation throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In this second reading, each chapter opens comparative perspectives on specific topics within some key fields of studies and international debates on modernity, including population, police, empire, technology, bureaucracy, social sciences, rural life, education, religion, nationalism, communism, and economy. Such a wide range of subjects, however, proves comprehensive enough to create a narrative where the reader may also locate the chief trends and dynamics developing in Portuguese history and society during the last two centuries. From this perspective, Portugal emerges as a country traversed by social conflict and struggling for modernization. Granted, this is not a very surprising picture, especially if we consider it in the historical context of European modernity. And yet, it is precisely this familiarity, one might argue, that allows The Making of Modern Portugal to become a useful tool for inserting the Portuguese case into the debates of a wide range of fields and disciplines in Europe and beyond.

Insurgent Testimonies

Witnessing Colonial Trauma in Modern and Anglophone Literature

Author: Nicole M. Rizzuto

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0823267814

Category: Commonwealth literature

Page: 288

View: 2176

During the second half of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth, insurgencies erupted in imperial states and colonies around the world, including Britain's. As Nicole Rizzuto shows, the writings of Ukrainian-born Joseph Conrad, Anglo-Irish Rebecca West, Jamaicans H. G. de Lisser and V. S. Reid, and Kenyan Ng gi wa Thiong'o testify to contested events in colonial modernity in ways that question premises underlying approaches in trauma and memory studies and invite us to reassess divisions and classifications in literary studies that generate such categories as modernist, colonial, postcolonial, national, and world literatures. Departing from tenets of modernist studies and from methods in the field of trauma and memory studies, Rizzuto contends that acute as well as chronic disruptions to imperial and national power and the legal and extra-legal responses they inspired shape the formal practices of literatures from the modernist, colonial, and postcolonial periods.

The Cambridge World History

Author: Jerry H. Bentley,Sanjay Subrahmanyam,Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521192463

Category: History

Page: 512

View: 8615

Comprehensive account of the intense biological, commercial, and cultural exchanges, and the creation of global connections, between 1400 and 1800.

The Worlding Project

Doing Cultural Studies in the Era of Globalization

Author: Rob Wilson,Christopher Leigh Connery

Publisher: North Atlantic Books

ISBN: 9781556436802

Category: Political Science

Page: 243

View: 6898

Globalization discourse now presumes that the “world space” is entirely at the mercy of market norms and forms promulgated by reactionary U.S. policies. An academic but accessible set of studies, this wide range of essays by noted scholars challenges this paradigm with diverse and strong arguments. Taking on topics that range from the medieval Mediterranean to contemporary Jamaican music, from Hong Kong martial arts cinema to Taiwanese politics, writers such as David Palumbo-Liu, Meaghan Morris, James Clifford, and others use innovative cultural studies to challenge the globalization narrative with a new and trenchant tactic called “worlding.” The book posits that world literature, cultural studies, and disciplinary practices must be “worlded” into expressions from disparate critical angles of vision, multiple frameworks, and field practices as yet emerging or unidentified. This opens up a major rethinking of historical “givens” from Rob Wilson’s reinvention of “The White Surfer Dude” to Sharon Kinoshita’s “Deprovincializing the Middle Ages.” Building on the work of cultural critics like Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, and Kenneth Burke, The Worlding Project is an important manifesto that aims to redefine the aesthetics and politics of postcolonial globalization withalternative forms and frames of global becoming.

MoMoWo. Women. Architecture & Design Itineraries across Europe

Author: Alain Bonnet,Ana María Fernández García,Marjan Groot,Simona Kermavnar,Franci Lazarini,Katarina Mohar,Maria Helena Souto,et al.

Publisher: Založba ZRC

ISBN: 9612549060

Category:

Page: 231

View: 9084

Arhitekturni vodič predstavlja izbrane projekte žensk na področju arhitekture in oblikovanja 20. in 21. stoletja. Obsega predstavitve dosežkov žensk v štirih evropskih mestih in dveh deželah: Barcelona, Lizbona, Pariz, Torino, Nizozemska in Slovenija. Vsak od teh je predstavljen z uvodnikom in tremi potmi, na koncu pa za vsako deželo sledi krajši zapis o eni od pionirk na področju arhitekture in oblikovanja. V vodiču je predstavljenih 125 objektov, poleg bogatih ilustracij pa nudi tudi osnovne informacije o dostopnosti izbrane lokacije. Kot strokovna brezplačna publikacija je izšel v okviru evropskega projekta »MoMoWo – Women's Creativity since the Modern Movement« in je dostopen tudi na domači strani projekta.

The Draining of the Fens

Projectors, Popular Politics, and State Building in Early Modern England

Author: Eric H. Ash

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142142200X

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7011

"This book is a political, social, and environmental history of the many attempts to drain the Fens of eastern England during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, both the early failures and the eventual successes. Fen drainage projects were supposed to transform hundreds of thousands of acres of wetlands into dry farmland capable of growing grain and other crops, and also reform the sickly, backward fenland inhabitants into civilized, healthy farmers, to the benefit of the entire commonwealth. Fenlanders, however, viewed the drainage as a grave threat to their local landscape, economy, and way of life. At issue were two different understandings of the Fens, what they were and ought to be; the power to define the Fens in the present was the power to determine their future destiny. The drainage projects, and the many conflicts they incited, illustrate the ways in which politics, economics, and ecological thought intersected at a time when attitudes toward both the natural environment and the commonwealth were shifting. Promoted by the crown, endorsed by agricultural improvement advocates, undertaken by English and Dutch projectors, and opposed by fenland commoners, the drainage of the Fens provides a fascinating locus to study the process of state building in early modern England, and the violent popular resistance it sometimes provoked. In exploring the many challenges the English faced in re-conceiving and re-creating their Fens, this book addresses important themes of environmental, political, economic, social, and technological history, and reveals new dimensions of the evolution of early modern England into a modern, unitary, capitalist state"--

Feminism, Time, and Nonlinear History

Author: V. Browne

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137413166

Category: Social Science

Page: 220

View: 2057

Interweaving phenomenological, hermeneutical, and sociopolitical analyses, this book considers the ways in which feminists conceptualize and produce the temporalities of feminism, including the time of the trace, narrative time, calendar time, and generational time.

Intersected Identities

Strategies of Visualisation in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-century Mexican Culture

Author: Erica Segre

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 9781845452919

Category: Art

Page: 316

View: 2867

There has always been an important visual element to the construction and questioning of national identity in post-Independence Mexico, though one that has not always been given its due, outside of the celebrated and much-studied muralists. Ranging from the early nineteenth century to the present - from the vogue for the picturesque, illustrated periodicals and the influential writings of Altamirano to a wealth of twentieth-century graphic artists, filmmakers and photographers this book re-examines the complex variety of ways in which that visual element has operated. In particular, it looks at the ways in which discourses concerning ethnicity and cultural hybridity have been echoed and transformed in Mexican visual culture, resulting in fields of visual discourse which are eclectic and increasingly self-reflexive.

On Their Own Terms

Author: Benjamin A. ELMAN

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674036476

Category: History

Page: 605

View: 6596

Since the middle of the nineteenth century, imperial reformers, early Republicans, Guomindang party cadres, and Chinese Communists have all prioritized science and technology. In this book, Elman gives a nuanced account of the ways in which native Chinese science evolved over four centuries, under the influence of both Jesuit and Protestant missionaries. In the end, he argues, the Chinese produced modern science on their own terms.

Class, Culture and Conflict in Barcelona, 1898-1937

Author: Chris Ealham

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113442339X

Category: History

Page: 284

View: 4633

This book investigates urban conflict, popular protest and social control in Barcelona during the period 1898-1937. Focusing upon the sources of anarchist power in the city and the role of the organised anarchist movement during the Second Republic the volume concludes with an analysis of the decline of the power of the anarchist movement during the civil war in its identification of the local conditions that made Barcelona into the capital of European anarchism.

Recodings

Art, Spectacle, Cultural Politics

Author: Hal Foster

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781565844643

Category: Art

Page: 243

View: 377

A Village Voice Best Book and a 'lucid and provocative work that allows us to glimpse stirrings and upheavals in the hothouse of modern art.' - Los Angeles Times

Whiteness in Zimbabwe

Race, Landscape, and the Problem of Belonging

Author: D. Hughes

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230106331

Category: Social Science

Page: 204

View: 2095

European settler societies have a long history of establishing a sense of belonging and entitlement outside Europe, but Zimbabwe has proven to be the exception to the rule. Arriving in the 1890s, white settlers never comprised more than a tiny minority. Instead of grafting themselves onto local societies, they adopted a strategy of escape.

Builders and Deserters

Students, State, and Community in Leningrad, 1917-1941

Author: Peter Konecny

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773518810

Category: Education

Page: 358

View: 3784

One of the most significant changes produced by the Bolshevik Revolution was the formation of an elite that identified with the new socialist order. Students in the rapidly expanding higher education system were part of this new elite. In Builders and Deserters Peter Konecny makes use of an unprecedented range of previously unavailable sources to examine the academic, cultural, and political dimensions of student life in the Soviet Union's second largest city, Leningrad.