My Story: Suffragette

Author: Carol Drinkwater

Publisher: Scholastic Non-Fiction

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 192

View: 666

It's 1909. Dollie is swept up in the thrill of the campaign for Votes for Women. Against her guardian's wishes, she marches against Parliament with Emmeline Pankhurst and fellow suffragettes. Things turn violent, women are imprisoned and endanger their lives with hunger strikes. Dollie must decide how far she will go for 'Deeds, not words'...

MY OWN STORY - The Emmeline Pankhurst Story

Author: Emmeline Pankhurst

Publisher: Abela Publishing Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 314

View: 939

The closing paragraphs of this book were written in the late summer of 1914, when the armies of every great power in Europe called upon their citizens, and the citizens of their colonies, to mobilised for savage, unsparing, barbarous warfare against one another, against small and unaggressive nations, against helpless women and children, and against civilisation itself. How mild, by comparison with the despatches in the daily newspapers, will seem this chronicle of women's militant struggle against political and social injustice in one small corner of Europe. Yet, let it stand as it was written, with peace—so-called, and civilisation, and orderly government as the background for heroism such as the world has seldom witnessed. The militancy of men, through all the centuries, has drenched the world with blood, and for these deeds of horror and destruction men have been rewarded with monuments, with great songs and epics. Yet, the militancy of women has harmed no human life save the lives of those who fought the battle of righteousness. Time alone has revealed what reward has been allotted to the women. In the black hour that struck in Europe, the men, indeed Governments, turned to their women and called on them to take up the work of keeping civilisation alive. Through all the harvest fields, in orchards and vineyards, women garnered food to send to the front, as well as for the children left fatherless by war. In the cities the women kept open the shops, drove trucks and trams, and operated machines in the factories which made clothing and the munitions for the impending battle ahead and altogether attended to a multitude of tasks to keep the wheels of commerce turning. At the first alarm of war, the militants proclaimed a truce, which was answered half-heartedly by Reginald McKenna, the Home Secretary’s announcement that all suffrage prisoners would be released who gave an undertaking "not to commit further crimes or outrages." A few days later, no doubt influenced by representations made to the Government by men and women of every political persuasion, Mr. McKenna announced in the House of Commons that it was the intention of the Government, to release unconditionally, all suffrage prisoners. So ended, for a short time, the war of women against men – until the clash of arms ceases. Then once more women will take up the arms they so generously laid down. “There can be no real peace in the world until woman, the mother half of the human family, are given liberty in the councils of the world” – Emmeline Pankhurst. YESTERDAY’S BOOKS FOR TODAY’S CHARITIES 10% of the profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charity. ============= KEYWORDS-TAGS: My Own Story, Emmeline Pankhurst, , 1914, Act of Parliament, agitate, Annie, arrest, authorities, Bill, Cabinet, case, Christabel Pankhurst, committee, Conciliation, court, daughter, declare, demands, deputation, doctor, education, Edward, election, England, facilities, Fight, franchise, freedom, friends, girls, Gladstone, Government, Great War, Hall, Herbert Asquith, Holloway, House of Commons, hundred, hunger, imprisonment, justice, King, law, Lawrence, leaders, letters, Liberal, life long, Lloyd George, London, Lord, magistrate, majority, Manchester, meetings, members, men, militancy, Minister, movement, Parliament, party, Pethick, petition, place, pledge, police, policy, political, power, Prime Minister, prison, prisoners, property, protest, public, punishment, question, refuse, release, school, Secretary, sentence, session, Social Movement, speech, Street, suffrage, Suffragettes, suffragists, trial, Union, vote, Winston Churchill, woman, women, Women’s rights, world, World War One, WWI

My Story: Suffragette (centenary Edition)

Author: Carol Drinkwater

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Children's stories

Page: 192

View: 759

18th June, 1910 We marched from the Embankment to the Albert Hall. It was a glorious day. The sun shone warmly. Everyone was in good spirits. There were aristocrats, artists, even my mother looked happy. She who has been so opposed to my work with the WSPU. More than 10,000 people had rallied and there were dozens of bands playing. It was quite incredible. We waved banners, carried flowers, sang along with the tunes. Hundreds who have been imprisoned for our Cause marched together in a powerful band. It was all very rousing of spirit. I felt proud to be a woman, proud to be alive, proud to be a part of a movement that is fighting to make a difference.

Suffragette

My Own Story

Author: Emmeline Pankhurst

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Motion picture plays

Page: 186

View: 268

The Suffragette Derby

Author: Michael Tanner

Publisher: Biteback Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 384

View: 872

On Wednesday 4 June 1913, fledgling newsreel cameras captured just over two-and-a-half minutes of neverto-be-forgotten British social and sporting history. The 250,000 people thronging Epsom Downs carried with them a quartet of combustible elements: a fanatical, publicity-hungry suffragette; a scapegoat for the Titanic disaster and the pillar of the Establishment who bore him a personal grudge; a pair of feuding jockeys at odds over money and glory; and, finally, at the heart of the action, two thoroughbred horses - one a vicious savage and one the consummate equine athlete. Taken together, this was a recipe for the most notorious horse race in British history. One hundred years on, this particular Derby Day is remembered for two reasons: the fatal intervention of Emily Davison, a militant suffragette who brought down the King's runner, and the controversial disqualification of Bower Ismay's horse Craganour on the grounds of rough riding - the first and only time a Derby-winner has forfeited its title for this reason. The sensation of Davison's questionable interference in the name of suffrage has overshadowed the outrage of Craganour's disqualification and the intricate reasons behind it. Now, with a view to allowing this scandal the attention it deserves, Michael Tanner replays the most dramatic day in Turf history - and finally uncovers the truth of the Suffragette Derby.

Suffragette Girl

Author: Margaret Dickinson

Publisher: Pan Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 528

View: 743

Suffragette Girl is an heart-wrenching tale of love and liberty by the author of The Clippie Girls, Margaret Dickinson. When Florrie Maltby defies her father by refusing to marry Gervase Richards, she sets off a chain of events that will alter her life. Instead she goes to London and becomes involved with the suffragette movement. She's imprisoned for her militant actions, and goes on hunger strike. With her health deteriorating, there is one person who can save her - Gervase. After a brief stay in the countryside to recuperate, Florrie returns to London to continue her fight for women's rights. Only the outbreak of the Great War puts a halt to her activities. It is when James, her younger brother, is shamed by their father into volunteering, that Florrie enlists as a nurse and is sent to the Front. Amidst the fear and horror of the hospital close to the trenches, she finds love. But when her beloved brother is accused of desertion, help comes from a very unexpected source.