Miami, a Backward Glance

Author: Muriel V. Murrell

Publisher: Pineapple Press Inc

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 191

View: 228

From the lavish parties, the yachts, and the innovative architecture to the sultry summer days, the mosquito bites, and the hurricanes, Muriel Murrell captures in a series of charming vignettes the early days of Miami. Her remembrances are populated with a fascinating mix of eccentric millionaires, artists, shysters, heiresses, and mobsters, some of whose names are recognizable today, and others whose names have disappeared into history along with the gracious winter homes once lining Brickell Avenue. Part memoir, part history, "Miami, A Backward Glance reminds us how the Magic City rose from the swamp, developing from a pioneer town to a luxury resort to an important crossroads of the Western Hemisphere.

Miami University of Ohio

Author: Tiffany Garrett

Publisher: College Prowler, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 135

View: 484

Provides a look at Miami University of Ohio from the students' viewpoint.

Miami

The Magic City

Author: Seth H. Bramson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 133

Miami sprang into existence on July 28, 1896, following the extension of the Florida East Coast Railway from West Palm Beach on April 15, 1896, and the publication of the soon-to-be city's first newspaper, The Miami Metropolis, on May 15, 1896. However, evidence suggests people lived in the area as early as the 1700s. Nicknamed "the Magic City" by publicists working for railroad and hotel builder Henry Flagler, Miami has weathered yellow fever epidemics, World War I, the 1920s boom and bust, World War II, and numerous other economic ups and downs to become one of the world's great cities and the catalyst for the growth of the South Florida megalopolis.

Jews of Greater Miami

Author: Marcia Jo Zerivitz

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 159

Miami was among Florida's last communities to develop a Jewish population. Since the late 1800s, the area that was once just a settlement of frontiersmen has grown to become the core of the nation's third-largest Jewish community. Jews were prominent in business when Miami was chartered in 1896 and began settling in Miami Beach as early as 1913. Though faced with hardship and public discrimination, the immigrant group continued to expand its presence. Images of America: Jews of Greater Miami contains photographs from family albums that are part of the archives of the Jewish Museum of Florida. Each historic photograph tells a story and documents the area's pioneer Jews, the diverse ways they contributed to the development of their community, and the doors they opened for the acceptance of all ethnicities.

The Miami-Illinois Language

Author: David J. Costa

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 566

View: 902

The Miami-Illinois Language reconstructs the language spoken by the Miami and the Illinois Native Americans. During the latter half of the seventeenth century both Native communities lived in the region to the south of Lake Michigan in present-day Illinois and Indiana. The French and Indian War, followed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries by massive influxes of white settlers into the Ohio River Valley, proved disastrous for both Native groups. Reduced in number by warfare and disease, the Illinois (now called the Peorias) along with half of the Miamis relocated first to Kansas and then to northeast Oklahoma, while the other half of the Miamis remained in northern Indiana. ø The Miami and the Illinois Native Americans speak closely related dialects of a language of the Algonquian language family. Linguist David J. Costa reconstructs key elements of their language from available historical sources, close textual analysis of surviving stories, and comparison with related Algonquian languages. The result is the first overview of the Miami-Illinois language.

Miami Beach in 1920

The Making of a Winter Resort

Author: Abraham D. Lavender

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 328

Recognized for its poise and fashion, Miami Beach embodies the best elements of the new American city: cultural diversity, imaginative architecture, and dazzling scenery. In many aspects, Miami Beach is a metropolitan masterpiece, sculpted by the careful hands of visionary entrepreneurs against a magnificent coastal backdrop. The evolution of Miami Beach from a small, uninhabited strip of palmetto scrub and swamp into an internationally-renowned resort is a fascinating tale of human ingenuity, endurance, and foresight. A milestone in the city's development, the year 1920 marked many significant improvement, such as the new County Causeway bridge, and many "firsts" for the expanding hamlet, including the first electric trolley, the first automated telephone system, and its first post office building. Readers of all ages will be thoroughly entertained as they explore their Miami Beach of yesteryear: a time of Prohibition and bootlegging, grand hotels and lavish casinos, budding polo fields and golf courses, and the many distinct personalities that added color and life to this burgeoning town.

Miami Beach

Author: Seth Bramson

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 130

Miami Beach began its rise to the top of the world's resort scene when Carl Fisher, builder of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, arrived prior to 1920. The lure of "The World's Playground" was impossible to ignore for many, as hotels and restaurants flourished, even through the Great Depression. The images in this volume evoke poignant memories of Miami Beach's great past, almost inevitable downturn, and return to life with the discovery of South Beach and a renewed interest in art deco. Among the vintage views, most of which have never before been published, are early Lincoln Road and Washington Avenue; Miami Beach High School; Parham's; Junior's; Wolfies; Pumperniks; the first hotel on Miami Beach, Brown's; the Roney Plaza; the Fontainebleau; and, of course, the people who helped create this modern paradise.

Miami and the Florida Keys

Author: Lisa Simundson

Publisher: Hunter Publishing, Inc

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 495

View: 313

Less than a day's drive from Boston, New York and Philly, the Catskill Mountains have long been a popular weekend retreat for city folk. The attractions are many - quiet lakes, scenic hikes, top-notch resorts, crafts and some of the country's best fly-fishing spots.

Miami Vice

Author: James Lyons

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 144

View: 696

Miami Vice captures the glitter and glamour embodied by Crockett and Tubbs and offers students an anatomy of a ground-breaking work in the police procedural genre. Explores Miami Vice’s combination of disparate influences (MTV, film noir, soap opera, ‘high concept’ action films) as well as the social, cultural and industrial moments when it burst onto the network Introduces readers to major components of televisual analysis--style, storytelling, the television show as commodity and ideological critique-- that illustrate the show’s unique features Provides a model for students’ own assessment of other shows, and confirms precisely how--and on what terms--Miami Vice redefined the police drama and an era

The Miami Indians

Author: Bert Anson

Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 486

One of the small group of tribes comprising the Illinois division of the Algonquian linguistic family, the Miamis emerged as a pivotal tribe only during the French and British imperial wars, the Miami Confederacy wars of the eighteenth century, and the treaty-making period of the nineteenth century. The Miamis reached their peak of political importance in the Indian confederacies which blocked the Northwest Territory in the 1790's and during the War of 1812. Their title to much of the present state of Indiana enabled them to make advantageous treaties and delay emigration until the late 1840's. The tribe's 1846-47 emigrations produced two branches, the Indiana group and the Kansas-Oklahoma group, which have maintained political co-operation in spite of deep-seated cultural antipathies and dispossession. Their solidarity has been rewarded by success in their suits before the United States Court of Claims. This account spans the years from 1658 to the present, emphasizing the occasions on which the Miamis were a decisive influence on the course of American history.