Forgiveness, Mercy, and Clemency

Author: Austin Sarat

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 238

View: 618

Arguments for forgiveness, mercy, and clemency abound. These arguments flourish in organized religion, fiction, philosophy, and law as well as in everyday conversations of daily life among parents and children, teachers and students, and criminals and those who judge them. As common as these arguments are, we are often left with an incomplete understanding of what we mean when we speak about them. This volume examines the registers of individual psychology, religious belief, social practice, and political power circulating in and around those who forgive, grant mercy, or pose clemency power. The authors suggest that, in many ways, necessary examinations of the questions of forgiveness and pardon and the connection between mercy and justice are only just beginning.

Aggravation, Mitigation, and Mercy in English Criminal Justice

Author: Nigel Walker

Publisher: Blackstone Press

ISBN:

Category: Aggravating circumstances

Page: 270

View: 696

Offering a comment on the justification for sentences, this work refutes jurisprudential attacks on the propriety of mercy, and discusses the shortcomings of the Court of Appeal's approaches to consistency and other principles of sentencing. The appendices list guideline cases" and definitions of "seriousness" for the purpose of different statutes."

Rich in Mercy

Linda Schubert's personal testimony

Author: Linda Schubert

Publisher: Linda Schubert

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 27

View: 341

Mercy on Trial

What It Means to Stop an Execution

Author: Austin Sarat

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 352

View: 617

On January 11, 2003, Illinois Governor George Ryan--a Republican on record as saying that "some crimes are so horrendous . . . that society has a right to demand the ultimate penalty"--commuted the capital sentences of all 167 prisoners on his state's death row. Critics demonized Ryan. For opponents of capital punishment, however, Ryan became an instant hero whose decision was seen as a signal moment in the "new abolitionist" politics to end killing by the state. In this compelling and timely work, Austin Sarat provides the first book-length work on executive clemency. He turns our focus from questions of guilt and innocence to the very meaning of mercy. Starting from Ryan's controversial decision, Mercy on Trial uses the lens of executive clemency in capital cases to discuss the fraught condition of mercy in American political life. Most pointedly, Sarat argues that mercy itself is on trial. Although it has always had a problematic position as a form of "lawful lawlessness," it has come under much more intense popular pressure and criticism in recent decades. This has yielded a radical decline in the use of the power of chief executives to stop executions. From the history of capital clemency in the twentieth century to surrounding legal controversies and philosophical debates about when (if ever) mercy should be extended, Sarat examines the issue comprehensively. In the end, he acknowledges the risks associated with mercy--but, he argues, those risks are worth taking.

Qualities of Mercy

Justice, Punishment, and Discretion

Author: Carolyn Strange

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 198

View: 598

Qualities of Mercy deals with the history of mercy, the remittance of punishments in the criminal law. The writers probe the discretionary use of power and inquire how it has been exercised to spare convicted criminals from the full might of the law. Drawing on the history of England, Canada, and Australia in periods when both capital and corporal punishment were still practised, they show that contrary to common assumptions the past was not a time of unmitigated terror and they ask what inspired restraint in punishment. They conclude that the ability to decide who lived and died -- through the exercise or denial of mercy -- reinforced the power structure.

Gwynedd-Mercy College

Author:

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 390

The story of Gwynedd-Mercy College (GMC) begins in 1831 with the founding of the Sisters of Mercy in Dublin, Ireland, by Catherine McAuley. The order came to Philadelphia in 1861 and to Gwynedd Valley in 1947 with a vision of establishing a junior college. In 1963, GMC became a four-year institution. Gwynedd-Mercy College captures the continuing traditions and values of the Sisters of Mercy, the history of the campus property and surrounding community, and the junior college years, while documenting the continuing growth of the college. Today GMC is a coeducational, fully accredited master's level institution offering certificate programs and associate, baccalaureate, and graduate degrees in business, arts and science, education, nursing, and allied health professions.

Mercy Otis Warren

Author and Historian

Author: Jennifer Blizin Gillis

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 112

View: 672

Profiles the life and work of a patriot whose gift for writing created support for independence.

Mercy

The Essence of the Gospel and the Key to Christian Life

Author: Cardinal Walter Kasper

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN:

Category: Christian life

Page: 270

View: 329

"This book has done me so much good." —Pope Francis From one the leading intellects in the church today—one whom Pope Francis has described as a "superb theologian"—comes perhaps his most important book yet. Available for the first time in English, Cardinal Kasper looks to capture the essence of the gospel message. Compassionate, bold, and brilliant, Cardinal Kasper has written a book which will be studied for generations.