Max Weber and German Politics, 1890-1920

Author: Wolfgang J. Mommsen

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 520

View: 362

A major work of German historiography, this comprehensive account of Weber's political views and activities reveals that, paradoxically, Weber was at once an ardent liberal and a determined German nationalist and imperialist. Wolfgang J. Mommsen shows the important links between these seemingly conflicting positions and provides a critique of Weber's sociology of power and his concept of democratic rule. First published in German in 1959, Max Weber and German Politics appeared in a revised edition in 1974 and became available in an English translation only in 1984. In writing this work, Mommsen drew extensively on Weber's published and unpublished essays, newspaper articles, memoranda, and correspondence.

Max Weber and German Politics

Author: Jacob Peter Mayer

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 393

This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.

Germany and the Modern World, 1880–1914

Author: Mark Hewitson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 470

View: 740

Re-assesses Germany's relationship with the wider world before 1914 by examining the connections between nationalism, transnationalism, imperialism and globalization.

Max Weber

Author: Peter Lassman

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 674

View: 918

This volume contains key writings, mainly recent, that define the current debate concerning our understanding of the nature of Max Weber's social and political thought. Topics covered include the interpretation of his central concepts; problems of method; meaning and value; liberalism, nationalism and democracy; and the fate of politics in a disenchanted world. Supplemented by a detailed and thoughtful introduction, this collection will be essential for libraries in social sciences and all scholars and students of Weber.

Max Weber and International Relations

Author: Richard Ned Lebow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 306

Max Weber explored the political, epistemological and ethical problems of modernity, and understood how closely connected they were. His efforts are imaginative, sophisticated, even inspiring, but also flawed. Weber's epistemological successes and failures highlight unresolvable tensions that are just as pronounced today and from which we have much to learn. This edited collection of essays offers novel readings of Weber's politics, approach to knowledge, rationality, counterfactuals, ideal types, power, bureaucracy, the state, history, and the non-Western world. The conclusions look at how some of his prominent successors have addressed or finessed the tensions of the epistemological between subjective values and subjective knowledge; the sociological between social rationalization and irrational myths; the personal among conflicting values; the political between the kinds of leaders democracies select and the national tasks that should be performed; and the tragic between human conscience and worldly affairs.

Weber: Political Writings

Author: Max Weber

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 606

Max Weber (1864-1920), generally known as a founder of modern social science, was concerned with political affairs throughout his life. The texts in this edition span his career and illustrate the development of his political thinking on the fate of Germany and the nature of politics in the modern Western state in an age of cultural "disenchantment." The introduction discusses the central themes of Weber's political thought, and a chronology, notes and an annotated bibliography place him in his political and cultural context.

Germany at the Fin de Siecle

Culture, Politics, and Ideas

Author: Suzanne L. Marchand

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 330

View: 842

The phrase fin de siecle conjures up images of artistic experimentation and political decadence. The contributors to this volume argue that Wilhelmine Germany - best known for its industrial and military muscle - also shared these traits.The phrase fin de siecle conjures up images of artistic experimentation and political decadence. The contributors to this volume argue that Wilhelmine Germany - best known for its industrial and military muscle - also shared these traits. Their essays look back to the years between 1885 and 1914 to find in Germany a mixture of sociopolitical malaise and experimental exhilaration that was similar in many ways to the better-known cases of France and Austria

War in Social Thought

Hobbes to the Present

Author: Hans Joas

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 298

This book, the first of its kind, provides a sweeping critical history of social theories about war and peace from Hobbes to the present. Distinguished social theorists Hans Joas and Wolfgang Knöbl present both a broad intellectual history and an original argument as they trace the development of thinking about war over more than 350 years--from the premodern era to the period of German idealism and the Scottish and French enlightenments, and then from the birth of sociology in the nineteenth century through the twentieth century. While focusing on social thought, the book draws on many disciplines, including philosophy, anthropology, and political science. Joas and Knöbl demonstrate the profound difficulties most social thinkers--including liberals, socialists, and those intellectuals who could be regarded as the first sociologists--had in coming to terms with the phenomenon of war, the most obvious form of large-scale social violence. With only a few exceptions, these thinkers, who believed deeply in social progress, were unable to account for war because they regarded it as marginal or archaic, and on the verge of disappearing. This overly optimistic picture of the modern world persisted in social theory even in the twentieth century, as most sociologists and social theorists either ignored war and violence in their theoretical work or tried to explain it away. The failure of the social sciences and especially sociology to understand war, Joas and Knöbl argue, must be seen as one of the greatest weaknesses of disciplines that claim to give a convincing diagnosis of our times.

Hitler's Empire

Nazi Rule in Occupied Europe

Author: Mark Mazower

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 768

View: 195

The powerful, disturbing history of Nazi Europe by Mark Mazower, one of Britain's leading historians and bestselling author of Dark Continent and Governing the World Hitler's Empire charts the landscape of the Nazi imperial imagination - from those economists who dreamed of turning Europe into a huge market for German business, to Hitler's own plans for new transcontinental motorways passing over the ethnically cleansed Russian steppe, and earnest internal SS discussions of political theory, dictatorship and the rule of law. Above all, this chilling account shows what happened as these ideas met reality. After their early battlefield triumphs, the bankruptcy of the Nazis' political vision for Europe became all too clear: their allies bailed out, their New Order collapsed in military failure, and they left behind a continent corrupted by collaboration, impoverished by looting and exploitation, and grieving the victims of war and genocide. About the author: Mark Mazower is Ira D.Wallach Professor of World Order Studies and Professor of History Professor of History at Columbia University. He is the author of Hitler's Greece: The Experience of Occupation, 1941-44, Dark Continent: Europe's Twentieth Century, The Balkans: A Short History (which won the Wolfson Prize for History), Salonica: City of Ghosts (which won both the Duff Cooper Prize and the Runciman Award) and Governing the World: The History of an Idea. He has also taught at Birkbeck College, University of London, Sussex University and Princeton. He lives in New York.

Germans Into Nazis

Author: Peter Fritzsche

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 619

Examines the rise of National Socialism in Germany