Mass Incarceration on Trial

A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America

Author: Jonathan Simon

Publisher: New Press, The

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 155

For nearly forty years the United States has been gripped by policies that have placed more than 2.5 million Americans in jails and prisons designed to hold a fraction of that number of inmates. Our prisons are not only vast and overcrowded, they are degrading—relying on racist gangs, lockdowns, and Supermax-style segregation units to maintain a tenuous order. Mass Incarceration on Trial examines a series of landmark decisions about prison conditions—culminating in Brown v. Plata, decided in May 2011 by the U.S. Supreme Court—that has opened an unexpected escape route from this trap of “tough on crime” politics. This set of rulings points toward values that could restore legitimate order to American prisons and, ultimately, lead to the demise of mass incarceration. Simon argues that much like the school segregation cases of the last century, these new cases represent a major breakthrough in jurisprudence—moving us from a hollowed-out vision of civil rights to the threshold of human rights and giving court backing for the argument that, because the conditions it creates are fundamentally cruel and unusual, mass incarceration is inherently unconstitutional. Since the publication of Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow, states around the country have begun to question the fundamental fairness of our criminal justice system. This book offers a provocative and brilliant reading to the end of mass incarceration.

Ethnicity and Criminal Justice in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Criminal Justice, Police Science, the Law, and Private Investigation and Security

Author: Martin Guevara Urbina

Publisher: Charles C Thomas Publisher

ISBN:

Category: Criminal justice, Administration of

Page: 356

View: 839

ETHNICITY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN THE ERA OF MASS INCARCERATION: A Critical Reader on the Latino Experience is designed as a Latino reader in criminal justice, covering a much broader spectrum of the Latino experience in criminal justice and society, while giving readers a broad overview of the Latino experience in a single book. Considering the shifting trends in demographics and the current state of the criminal justice system, along with the current political “climate,” this book is timely and of critical significance for the academic, political, and social arena. The authors report sound evidence that testifies to a historical legacy of violence, brutality, manipulation, oppression, marginalization, prejudice, discrimination, power, and control, and to white America’s continued fear about ethnic and racial minorities, a movement that continues in the twenty-first century—as we have been witnessing during the 2015-2016 presidential race, highly charged with anti-immigrant and anti-Mexican political rhetoric. A central objective of this book is to demystify and expose the ways in which ideas of ethnicity, race, gender, and class uphold the functioning and “legitimacy” of the criminal justice system. In this mission, rather than attempting to develop a single explanation for the Latino experience in policing, the courts, and the penal system, this book presents a variety of studies and perspectives that illustrate alternative ways of interpreting crime, punishment, safety, equality, and justice. The findings reveal that race, ethnicity, gender, class, and several other variables continue to play a significant role in the legal decision-making process. With the social control (from police brutality to immigration) discourse reaching unprecedented levels, the book will have broad appeal for students, police officers, advocates/activists, attorneys, the media, and the general public.

Compulsory

Education and the Dispossession of Youth in a Prison School

Author: Sabina E. Vaught

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 392

View: 434

“This is an American story, unsettled by contradictions, constituted by unresolvable loss and open-ended hope, produced through brutal exclusivities and persistent insurgencies. This is the story of Lincoln prison.” In her Introduction, Sabina E. Vaught passionately details why the subject of prisons and prison schooling is so important. An unprecedented institutional ethnography of race and gender power in one state’s juvenile prison school system, Compulsory will have major implications for public education everywhere. Vaught argues that through its educational apparatus, the state disproportionately removes young Black men from their homes and subjects them to the abuses of captivity. She explores the various legal and ideological forces shaping juvenile prison and prison schooling, and examines how these forces are mechanized across multiple state apparatuses, not least school. Drawing richly on ethnographic data, she tells stories that map the repression of rightless, incarcerated youth, whose state captivity is the contemporary expression of age-old practices of child removal and counterinsurgency. Through a theoretically rigorous analysis of the daily experiences of prisoners, teachers, state officials, mothers, and more, Compulsory provides vital insight into the broad compulsory systems of schooling—both Inside prison and in the world Outside—asking readers to reconsider conventional understandings of the role, purpose, and value of state schooling today.

Contemporary Issues in Victimology

Identifying Patterns and Trends

Author: Carly M. Hilinski-Rosick

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 290

View: 547

This book explores and analyzes contemporary issues associated with victimology in more depth than is possible in an introductory textbook. Included are chapters on rape and sexual assault on the college campus, mass shootings, institutional victimization, and child-to-parent violence, among others.

Handbook of the Life Course

Author: Michael J. Shanahan

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 720

View: 628

Building on the success of the 2003 Handbook of the Life Course, this second volume identifies future directions for life course research and policy. The introductory essay and the chapters that make up the five sections of this book, show consensus on strategic “next steps” in life course studies. These next steps are explored in detail in each section: Section I, on life course theory, provides fresh perspectives on well-established topics, including cohorts, life stages, and legal and regulatory contexts. It challenges life course scholars to move beyond common individualistic paradigms. Section II highlights changes in major institutional and organizational contexts of the life course. It draws on conceptual advances and recent empirical findings to identify promising avenues for research that illuminate the interplay between structure and agency. It examines trends in family, school, and workplace, as well as contexts that deserve heightened attention, including the military, the criminal justice system, and natural and man-made disaster. The remaining three sections consider advances and suggest strategic opportunities in the study of health and development throughout the life course. They explore methodological innovations, including qualitative and three-generational longitudinal research designs, causal analysis, growth curves, and the study of place. Finally, they show ways to build bridges between life course research and public policy.

Harvard Law Review: Volume 128, Number 4 - February 2015

Author: Harvard Law Review

Publisher: Quid Pro Books

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 272

View: 422

The Harvard Law Review, February 2015, is offered in a digital edition. Contents include: • Article, "The Consequences of Error in Criminal Justice," Daniel Epps • Book Review, "Running Government Like a Business ... Then and Now," Jon D. Michaels • Note, "International Norms and Politics in the Marshall Court's Slave Trade Cases" • Note, "Congress's Power to Define the Privileges and Immunities of Citizenship" • Note, "It's About Time (Place and Manner): Why and How Congress Must Act to Protect Access to Early Voting" • Note, "The Psychology of Cruelty: Recognizing Grave Mental Harm in American Prisons" In addition, the issue features student commentary on Recent Cases, Legislation, and Executive Orders, including such subjects as: whether false claims used to advise or encourage suicide are protected speech; whether pollutants from rail yards are "disposal" of solid waste; class action standing of absent class members in certain BP oil spill claims; review of an SEC settlement; municipal bankruptcy and preemption; requiring on-the-record indigency proceedings prior to incarceration for failure to pay fines; and prohibition of federal government and contractor employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. Finally, the issue features several summaries of Recent Publications. This issue of the Review is Feb. 2015, the fourth issue of academic year 2014-2015 (Volume 128). The digital edition features active Contents, linked notes, and proper ebook and Bluebook formatting.

The Legal Process and the Promise of Justice

Studies Inspired by the Work of Malcolm Feeley

Author: Rosann Greenspan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 250

View: 350

Malcolm Feeley's classic scholarship on courts, criminal justice, legal reform, and the legal complex, examined by law and society scholars.

The Blast

Author: Alexander Berkman

Publisher: AK Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 242

View: 961

Explosive writing, reporting and rhetoric of Berkman, Emma Goldman, and others who attempted revolution in 1916-17.