Mary and O'Neil

Author: Justin Cronin

Publisher: Delta

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 838

Mary and O’Neil frequently marveled at how, of all the lives they might have led, they had somehow found this one together. When they met at the Philadelphia high school where they’d come to teach, each had suffered a profound loss that had not healed. How likely was it that they could learn to trust, much less love, again? Justin Cronin’s poignant debut traces the lives of Mary Olson and O’Neil Burke, two vulnerable young teachers who rediscover in each other a world alive with promise and hope. From the formative experiences of their early adulthood to marriage, parenthood, and beyond, this novel in stories illuminates the moments of grace that enable Mary and O’Neil to make peace with the deep emotional legacies that haunt them: the sudden, mysterious death of O’Neil’s parents, Mary’s long-ago decision to end a pregnancy, O’Neil’s sister’s battle with illness and a troubled marriage. Alive with magical nuance and unexpected encounters, Mary and O’Neil celebrates the uncommon in common lives, and the redemptive power of love.

Mary & O'Neil

Author: Justin Cronin

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing UK

ISBN:

Category: Life change events

Page: 256

View: 931

'A rare combination of brilliant prose, precise feeling and omniscient wisdom' - Andrea Barrett

American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell

Author: Deborah Solomon

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 441

A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR A FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE IN BIOGRAPHY AND SHORTLISTED FOR THE PEN/JACQUELINE BOGRAD WELD AWARD FOR BIOGRAPHY "Welcome to Rockwell Land," writes Deborah Solomon in the introduction to this spirited and authoritative biography of the painter who provided twentieth-century America with a defining image of itself. As the star illustrator of The Saturday Evening Post for nearly half a century, Norman Rockwell mingled fact and fiction in paintings that reflected the we-the-people, communitarian ideals of American democracy. Freckled Boy Scouts and their mutts, sprightly grandmothers, a young man standing up to speak at a town hall meeting, a little black girl named Ruby Bridges walking into an all-white school—here was an America whose citizens seemed to believe in equality and gladness for all. Who was this man who served as our unofficial "artist in chief" and bolstered our country's national identity? Behind the folksy, pipe-smoking façade lay a surprisingly complex figure—a lonely painter who suffered from depression and was consumed by a sense of inadequacy. He wound up in treatment with the celebrated psychoanalyst Erik Erikson. In fact, Rockwell moved to Stockbridge, Massachusetts so that he and his wife could be near Austen Riggs, a leading psychiatric hospital. "What's interesting is how Rockwell's personal desire for inclusion and normalcy spoke to the national desire for inclusion and normalcy," writes Solomon. "His work mirrors his own temperament—his sense of humor, his fear of depths—and struck Americans as a truer version of themselves than the sallow, solemn, hard-bitten Puritans they knew from eighteenth-century portraits." Deborah Solomon, a biographer and art critic, draws on a wealth of unpublished letters and documents to explore the relationship between Rockwell's despairing personality and his genius for reflecting America's brightest hopes. "The thrill of his work," she writes, "is that he was able to use a commercial form [that of magazine illustration] to thrash out his private obsessions." In American Mirror, Solomon trains her perceptive eye not only on Rockwell and his art but on the development of visual journalism as it evolved from illustration in the 1920s to photography in the 1930s to television in the 1950s. She offers vivid cameos of the many famous Americans whom Rockwell counted as friends, including President Dwight Eisenhower, the folk artist Grandma Moses, the rock musician Al Kooper, and the generation of now-forgotten painters who ushered in the Golden Age of illustration, especially J. C. Leyendecker, the reclusive legend who created the Arrow Collar Man. Although derided by critics in his lifetime as a mere illustrator whose work could not compete with that of the Abstract Expressionists and other modern art movements, Rockwell has since attracted a passionate following in the art world. His faith in the power of storytelling puts his work in sync with the current art scene. American Mirror brilliantly explains why he deserves to be remembered as an American master of the first rank.

Rancho Santa Margarita

Author: Michael A. Moodian

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 208

Set in the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains, Rancho Santa Margarita is a vibrant city with the unique quality of an urban village. Although incorporated on January 1, 2000, making it one of California's youngest cities, it has a rich and intriguing history that dates back to the origins of the Golden State. During the late 1800s, the original ranch covered 230,000 acres, making it one of the largest in the Southwest. With many never-before-seen images, this book captures the essence of this fascinating story of the city, including the Spanish expedition in the 1700s, the Mexican governance of the land, the ownership of the area by the O'Neill family, the ranch activities of the 1960s, and the building of city landmarks in the 1980s, including the development of the most scenic lake in Orange County.

Great Grammar Lessons that Work

Using Poems, Picturebooks, Games, and Writing Activities to Teach Grammar and Help Students Become Better Writers

Author: Lee Karnowski

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 96

View: 608

A hands-on discovery mode of teaching English grammar using a variety of techniques.

Storytelling on the Northern Irish Border

Characters and Community

Author: Ray Cashman

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 139

More than quaint local color, folklore is a crucial part of life in Aghyaran, a mixed Catholic-Protestant border community in Northern Ireland. Neighbors socialize during wakes and ceilis—informal nighttime gatherings—without regard to religious, ethnic, or political affiliation. The witty, sometimes raucous stories swapped on these occasions offer a window into Aghyaran residents’ views of self and other in the wake of decades of violent conflict. Through anecdotes about local characters, participants explore the nature of community and identity in ways that transcend Catholic or Protestant sectarian histories. Ray Cashman analyzes local character anecdotes in detail and argues that while politicians may take credit for the peace process in Northern Ireland, no political progress would be possible without ordinary people using shared resources of storytelling and socializing to imagine and maintain community.

Irish Politics Today

Author: Neil Collins

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 163

View: 552

This introduction to the politics of the Irish republic includes coverage of the 1997 general election, and the creation of a new coalition of Fianna Fail and the Progressive Democrats under Bertie Ahern that year. Reflecting recent developments in Irish politics, the book now has an entire chapter devoted to sleaze.