Mañana Es San Perón

A Cultural History of Peron's Argentina

Author: Mariano Ben Plotkin

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842050296

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 3726

The regime of Juan Per-n is one of the most studied topics of Argentina's contemporary history. This new book-an English translation of a highly popular, critically acclaimed Spanish language edition-provides a new perspective on the intriguing Argentinian leader. Mariano Plotkin's cultural approach makes Per-n's popularity understandable because it goes beyond Per-n's charismatic appeal and analyzes the Peronist mechanisms used to generate political consent and mass mobilization. Ma-ana es San Per-n is the first book to focus on the cultural and symbolic dimensions of Peronism and populism. It explores the creation of myths, symbols, and rituals which constituted the Peronist political imagery. This well-written and engaging account of one of Latin America's most colorful and appealing leaders is an excellent resource on Argentina and Latin American history and politics.

Lines in the Sand

Nationalism and Identity on the Peruvian-Chilean Frontier

Author: William E. Skuban

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN: 9780826342232

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 3474

Following the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile and Peru signed the Treaty of Ancón (1884) that, in part, dealt with settling a territorial dispute over the provinces of Tacna and Arica along the countries' new common border. The treaty allowed Chile to administer the two provinces for a period of ten years, after which a plebiscite would allow the region's inhabitants to determine their own nationality. At the end of the prearranged decade, however, the Chilean and the Peruvian governments had failed to conduct the vote that would determine the fate of the people. Over a quarter of a century later, and after attempts by the U.S. government to mediate the dispute, the two countries in 1929 decided simply to divide the area, with Arica becoming a part of Chile and Peru reincorporating Tacna. Against the backdrop of this contested frontier, William Skuban explores the processes of nationalism and national identity formation in the half century that followed the War of the Pacific. He first considers the national projects of Peru and Chile in the disputed territories and then moves on to how these efforts were received among the diverse social strata of the region. Skuban's study highlights the fabricated nature of national identity in what became one of the most contentious frontier situations in South American history.

The New Cultural History of Peronism

Power and Identity in Mid-Twentieth-Century Argentina

Author: Matthew B. Karush,Oscar Chamosa

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392860

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 2343

In nearly every account of modern Argentine history, the first Peronist regime (1946–55) emerges as the critical juncture. Appealing to growing masses of industrial workers, Juan Perón built a powerful populist movement that transformed economic and political structures, promulgated new conceptions and representations of the nation, and deeply polarized the Argentine populace. Yet until now, most scholarship on Peronism has been constrained by a narrow, top-down perspective. Inspired by the pioneering work of the historian Daniel James and new approaches to Latin American cultural history, scholars have recently begun to rewrite the history of mid-twentieth-century Argentina. The New Cultural History of Peronism brings together the best of this important new scholarship. Situating Peronism within the broad arc of twentieth-century Argentine cultural change, the contributors focus on the interplay of cultural traditions, official policies, commercial imperatives, and popular perceptions. They describe how the Perón regime’s rhetoric and representations helped to produce new ideas of national and collective identity. At the same time, they show how Argentines pursued their interests through their engagement with the Peronist project, and, in so doing, pushed the regime in new directions. While the volume’s emphasis is on the first Perón presidency, one contributor explores the origins of the regime and two others consider Peronism’s transformations in subsequent years. The essays address topics including mass culture and melodrama, folk music, pageants, social respectability, architecture, and the intense emotional investment inspired by Peronism. They examine the experiences of women, indigenous groups, middle-class anti-Peronists, internal migrants, academics, and workers. By illuminating the connections between the state and popular consciousness, The New Cultural History of Peronism exposes the contradictions and ambivalences that have characterized Argentine populism. Contributors: Anahi Ballent, Oscar Chamosa, María Damilakou, Eduardo Elena, Matthew B. Karush, Diana Lenton, Mirta Zaida Lobato, Natalia Milanesio, Mariano Ben Plotkin, César Seveso, Lizel Tornay

A Nation for All

Race, Inequality, and Politics in Twentieth-Century Cuba

Author: Alejandro de la Fuente

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807898765

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 4362

After thirty years of anticolonial struggle against Spain and four years of military occupation by the United States, Cuba formally became an independent republic in 1902. The nationalist coalition that fought for Cuba's freedom, a movement in which blacks and mulattoes were well represented, had envisioned an egalitarian and inclusive country--a nation for all, as Jose Marti described it. But did the Cuban republic, and later the Cuban revolution, live up to these expectations? Tracing the formation and reformulation of nationalist ideologies, government policies, and different forms of social and political mobilization in republican and postrevolutionary Cuba, Alejandro de la Fuente explores the opportunities and limitations that Afro-Cubans experienced in such areas as job access, education, and political representation. Challenging assumptions of both underlying racism and racial democracy, he contends that racism and antiracism coexisted within Cuban nationalism and, in turn, Cuban society. This coexistence has persisted to this day, despite significant efforts by the revolutionary government to improve the lot of the poor and build a nation that was truly for all.

Phallacies

Historical Intersections of Disability and Masculinity

Author: Kathleen M. Brian,James W. Trent, Jr.

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190459018

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 7368

Phallacies: Historical Intersections of Disability and Masculinity is a collection of essays that focuses on disabled men who negotiate their masculinity as well as their disability. The chapters cover a broad range of topics: institutional structures that define what it means to be a man with a disability; the place of women in situations where masculinity and disability are constructed; men with physical and war-related disabilities; male hysteria, suicide clubs, and mercy killing; male disability in literature and popular culture; and more. All the authors regard masculinity and disability in the historical contexts of the Americas and Western Europe, with particular attention to the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Taken together, the essays in this volume offer a nuanced portrait of the complex, and at times competing, interactions between masculinity and disability.

Freud in the Pampas

The Emergence and Development of a Psychoanalytic Culture in Argentina

Author: Mariano Ben Plotkin

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9780804740609

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 3826

This is a fascinating history of how psychoanalysis became an essential element of contemporary Argentine culture--in the media, in politics, and in daily private lives. The book reveals the unique conditions and complex historical process that made possible the diffusion, acceptance, and popularization of psychoanalysis in Argentina, which has the highest number of psychoanalysts per capita in the world. It shows why the intellectual trajectory of the psychoanalytic movement was different in Argentina than in either the United States or Europe and how Argentine culture both fostered and was shaped by its influence. The book starts with a description of the Argentine medical and intellectual establishments’ reception of psychoanalysis, and the subsequent founding of the Argentine Psychoanalytic Association in 1942. It then broadens to describe the emergence of a "psy culture” in the 1960s, tracing its origins to a complex combination of social, economic, political, and cultural factors. The author then analyzes the role of "diffusers” of psychoanalysis in Argentina--both those who were part of the psychoanalytic establishment and those who were not. The book goes on to discuss specific areas of reception and diffusion of psychoanalytic thought: its acceptance by progressive sectors of the psychiatric profession; the impact of the psychoanalytically oriented program in psychology at the University of Buenos Aires; and the incorporation of psychoanalysis into the theoretical artillery of the influential left of the 1960s and 1970s. Finally, the author analyzes the effects of the military dictatorship, established in 1976, on the "psy” universe, showing how it was possible to practice psychoanalysis in a highly authoritarian political context.

Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt

Between the New World and the Third World

Author: Beatrice D. Gurwitz

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004329625

Category: Religion

Page: 244

View: 4843

Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt traces the ongoing efforts among Argentine Jews to rethink the Argentine nation, Jewish membership in it, and the nature of Jewishness itself through the revolutionary ferment of the 1960s and 1970s.

Mexicans in Revolution, 1910-1946

An Introduction

Author: William H. Beezley,Colin M. MacLachlan

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803224478

Category: History

Page: 189

View: 4441

Recounts the events surrounding the Mexican Revolution, covering key moments, conflicts, and developments from 1910 to 1920 and explaining how Mexicans fought for social and economic justice while shaping modern Mexico.

Spanish Word Games For Dummies

Author: Adam Cohen,Leslie Frates

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0470502002

Category: Foreign Language Study

Page: 288

View: 5733

The fun and easy way to learn Spanish-by playing games! Do you want to learn how to speak Spanish? One major aspect of learning a new language is learning the vocabulary, but for many people, this involves memorization, which can be a difficult task. Now, Spanish Word Games For Dummies offers you a fun and painless alternative: games and puzzles designed to help you practice and remember your Spanish vocabulary. This fun, practical guide features more than 100 word games and puzzles, including crosswords, word searches, cryptograms, and more-that range in difficulty from easy to challenging. As you play, you'll develop your Spanish vocabulary while you improve your language skills. Spanish Word Games For Dummies provides you with challenging puzzles to build your Spanish vocabulary and enhance your skill set Includes crosswords, word searches, cryptograms, and other word games Works as a supplement to Spanish language courses and programs It's portable enough to easily take to classes or on the road Whether you're a proficient speaker looking to brush up on your vocabulary or a first-time Spanish speaker, this clever guide is the ideal way to have fun while you increase your skills!

Psychoanalysis and Politics

Histories of Psychoanalysis Under Conditions of Restricted Political Freedom

Author: Joy Damousi,Mariano Ben Plotkin

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN: 0199744661

Category: Psychology

Page: 288

View: 6465

More than just a therapeutic technique, psychoanalysis as a school of thought has redefined our ideas on sexuality, the self, morality, family, and the nature of the mind for much of the twentieth century. At its broadest, Freud's thinking on civilization and social forces provides a context in which to consider the history of political struggle among individuals and societies. This volume explores a central paradox in the evolution of psychoanalytic thought and practice and the ways in which they were used. Why and how have some authoritarian regimes utilized psychoanalytic concepts of the self to envisage a new social and political order? How did psychoanalysis provide both theoretical and practical elements to legitimize resistance to those same regimes? How can a school of thought be co-opted so deftly by different groups for different political ends? Bringing together contributions from innovative scholars of history, politics, and psychoanalysis, this volume analyzes the various outcomes of this fascinating and influential theory's development under a wide spectrum of governments that restricted political and cultural freedoms from the 1930s to the present. The regimes analyzed range from Fascist Italy, Vichy France, and Spain and Hungary under Fascism and Communism; modern Latin American dictatorships, such as Brazil and Argentina in the 1960s and 1970s; and the influence of Hoover, McCarthy, and the larger Cold War on psychoanalysis in America. A fresh addition to an enormous body of scholarship, this will be required reading for academics interested in the relationship between politics and non-political systems of thoughts and beliefs, the transnational circulation of ideas, social movements, and the intellectual and social history of psychoanalysis.

Quality of Life in Communities of Latin Countries

Author: Graciela Tonon

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319531832

Category: Social Science

Page: 286

View: 5664

This book presents a reconfiguration of the concepts of community in Latin countries as well as the community quality of life and well-being of different groups: children, young people, older adults, migrants. The traditional concept of community has changed together with the way people participate in community spaces. Community nowadays is more than a geographic concentration; it is related to social support, inter-subjectivity, participation, consensus, common beliefs, joint effort aiming at a major objective, and intense and extensive relationships. This volume presents unique experiences about culture, social development, health, water, armed conflicts, the digital media, and sports within communities, written by authors from Latin countries. This volume is a valuable resource for researchers, students, and policy makers in quality of life studies.

Latin American Women and the Search for Social Justice

Author: Francesca Miller

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9780874515589

Category: Political Science

Page: 324

View: 8585

A clear and detailed study of Latin American women’s history from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Anything Goes

A History of American Musical Theatre

Author: Ethan Mordden

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199892830

Category: History

Page: 346

View: 7687

Offers a history of American musical theater from the 1920s through to the 1970s, and includes such famous works as "Oklahoma!," "The Red Mill," and "Porgy and Bess."

The Persistence of the Human

Consciousness, Meta-body and Survival in Contemporary Film and Literature

Author: Matthew Escobar

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004323678

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 228

View: 5649

The Persistence of the Human explores literary and cinematic works dealing with personal identity and consciousness. Escobar examines works in which traumatic loss challenges identity and the question of “the human” arises concluding that narrative is essential for the self.

National Identity and Global Sports Events

Culture, Politics, and Spectacle in the Olympics and the Football World Cup

Author: Alan Tomlinson

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 0791482480

Category: Social Science

Page: 253

View: 5866

Explains why cities dig deep in their pockets to host the Olympics and countries breed teams for success on the world soccer stage.

The Cambridge History of Latin American Women's Literature

Author: Ileana Rodríguez,Mónica Szurmuk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 131641910X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 7621

The Cambridge History of Latin American Women's Literature is an essential resource for anyone interested in the development of women's writing in Latin America. Ambitious in scope, it explores women's literature from ancient indigenous cultures to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Organized chronologically and written by a host of leading scholars, this History offers an array of approaches that contribute to current dialogues about translation, literary genres, oral and written cultures, and the complex relationship between literature and the political sphere. Covering subjects from cronistas in Colonial Latin America and nation-building to feminicide and literature of the indigenous elite, this History traces the development of a literary tradition while remaining grounded in contemporary scholarship. The Cambridge History of Latin American Women's Literature will not only engage readers in ongoing debates but also serve as a definitive reference for years to come.

Historical Dictionary of Inter-American Organizations

Author: David W. Dent,Larman C. Wilson

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810878615

Category: Political Science

Page: 506

View: 4828

This updated second edition of Historical Dictionary of Inter-American Organizations covers the history of through a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 400 hundred cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Inter-American Organizations.

Bicycle Diaries

Author: David Byrne

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101464397

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 3748

A round-the-world bicycle tour with one of the most original artists of our day. Urban bicycling has become more popular than ever as recession-strapped, climate-conscious city dwellers reinvent basic transportation. In this wide-ranging memoir, artist/musician and co-founder of Talking Heads David Byrne--who has relied on a bike to get around New York City since the early 1980s--relates his adventures as he pedals through and engages with some of the world's major cities. From Buenos Aires to Berlin, he meets a range of people both famous and ordinary, shares his thoughts on art, fashion, music, globalization, and the ways that many places are becoming more bike-friendly. Bicycle Diaries is an adventure on two wheels conveyed with humor, curiosity, and humanity.