Judgment Days

Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Laws that Changed America

Author: Nick Kotz

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780618641833

Category: History

Page: 522

View: 7919

The first comprehensive account of the relationship between President Johnson and Martin Luther King uses FBI wiretaps, Johnson's taped telephone conversations, and previously undisclosed communications between the two to paint a fascinating portrait of this important relationship. Reprint.

Lyndon B. Johnson

The American Presidents Series: The 36th President, 1963-1969

Author: Charles Peters

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9781429948241

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 224

View: 2349

The towering figure who sought to transform America into a "Great Society" but whose ambitions and presidency collapsed in the tragedy of the Vietnam War Few figures in American history are as compelling and complex as Lyndon Baines Johnson, who established himself as the master of the U.S. Senate in the 1950s and succeeded John F. Kennedy in the White House after Kennedy's assassination on November 22, 1963. Charles Peters, a keen observer of Washington politics for more than five decades, tells the story of Johnson's presidency as the tale of an immensely talented politician driven by ambition and desire. As part of the Kennedy-Johnson administration from 1961 to 1968, Peters knew key players, including Johnson's aides, giving him inside knowledge of the legislative wizardry that led to historic triumphs like the Voting Rights Act and the personal insecurities that led to the tragedy of Vietnam. Peters's experiences have given him unique insight into the poisonous rivalry between Johnson and Robert F. Kennedy, showing how their misunderstanding of each other exacerbated Johnson's self-doubt and led him into the morass of Vietnam, which crippled his presidency and finally drove this larger-than-life man from the office that was his lifelong ambition.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 3: History

Author: Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616556

Category: Reference

Page: 408

View: 8794

Providing a chronological and interpretive spine to the twenty-four volumes of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, this volume broadly surveys history in the American South from the Paleoindian period (approximately 8000 B.C.E.) to the present. In 118 essays, contributors cover the turbulent past of the region that has witnessed frequent racial conflict, a bloody Civil War fought and lost on its soil, massive in- and out-migration, major economic transformations, and a civil rights movement that brought fundamental change to the social order. Charles Reagan Wilson's overview essay examines the evolution of southern history and the way our understanding of southern culture has unfolded over time and in response to a variety of events and social forces--not just as the opposite of the North but also in the larger context of the Atlantic World. Longer thematic essays cover major eras and events, such as early settlement, slave culture, Reconstruction, the New Deal, and the rise of the New South. Brief topical entries cover individuals--including figures from the Civil War, the civil rights movement, and twentieth-century politics--and organizations such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Daughters of the Confederacy, and Citizens' Councils, among others. Together, these essays offer a sweeping reference to the rich history of the region.

The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement

Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968

Author: David C. Carter

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469606577

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 1994

After the passage of sweeping civil rights and voting rights legislation in 1964 and 1965, the civil rights movement stood poised to build on considerable momentum. In a famous speech at Howard University in 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared that victory in the next battle for civil rights would be measured in "equal results" rather than equal rights and opportunities. It seemed that for a brief moment the White House and champions of racial equality shared the same objectives and priorities. Finding common ground proved elusive, however, in a climate of growing social and political unrest marked by urban riots, the Vietnam War, and resurgent conservatism. Examining grassroots movements and organizations and their complicated relationships with the federal government and state authorities between 1965 and 1968, David C. Carter takes readers through the inner workings of local civil rights coalitions as they tried to maintain strength within their organizations while facing both overt and subtle opposition from state and federal officials. He also highlights internal debates and divisions within the White House and the executive branch, demonstrating that the federal government's relationship to the movement and its major goals was never as clear-cut as the president's progressive rhetoric suggested. Carter reveals the complex and often tense relationships between the Johnson administration and activist groups advocating further social change, and he extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 24: Race

Author: Thomas C. Holt,Laurie Beth Green,Charles Reagan Wilson

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607247

Category: Reference

Page: 320

View: 1672

There is no denying that race is a critical issue in understanding the South. However, this concluding volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture challenges previous understandings, revealing the region's rich, ever-expanding diversity and providing new explorations of race relations. In 36 thematic and 29 topical essays, contributors examine such subjects as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Japanese American incarceration in the South, relations between African Americans and Native Americans, Chinese men adopting Mexican identities, Latino religious practices, and Vietnamese life in the region. Together the essays paint a nuanced portrait of how concepts of race in the South have influenced its history, art, politics, and culture beyond the familiar binary of black and white.

Power to the Poor

Black-Brown Coalition and the Fight for Economic Justice, 1960-1974

Author: Gordon K. Mantler

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469608065

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 7016

The Poor People's Campaign of 1968 has long been overshadowed by the assassination of its architect, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and the political turmoil of that year. In a major reinterpretation of civil rights and Chicano movement history, Gordon K. Mantler demonstrates how King's unfinished crusade became the era's most high-profile attempt at multiracial collaboration and sheds light on the interdependent relationship between racial identity and political coalition among African Americans and Mexican Americans. Mantler argues that while the fight against poverty held great potential for black-brown cooperation, such efforts also exposed the complex dynamics between the nation's two largest minority groups. Drawing on oral histories, archives, periodicals, and FBI surveillance files, Mantler paints a rich portrait of the campaign and the larger antipoverty work from which it emerged, including the labor activism of Cesar Chavez, opposition of Black and Chicano Power to state violence in Chicago and Denver, and advocacy for Mexican American land-grant rights in New Mexico. Ultimately, Mantler challenges readers to rethink the multiracial history of the long civil rights movement and the difficulty of sustaining political coalitions.

The Senator and the Sharecropper

The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer

Author: Chris Myers Asch

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807878057

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 1046

In this fascinating study of race, politics, and economics in Mississippi, Chris Myers Asch tells the story of two extraordinary personalities--Fannie Lou Hamer and James O. Eastland--who represented deeply opposed sides of the civil rights movement. Both were from Sunflower County: Eastland was a wealthy white planter and one of the most powerful segregationists in the U.S. Senate, while Hamer, a sharecropper who grew up desperately poor just a few miles from the Eastland plantation, rose to become the spiritual leader of the Mississippi freedom struggle. Asch uses Hamer's and Eastland's entwined histories, set against the backdrop of Sunflower County's rise and fall as a center of cotton agriculture, to explore the county's changing social landscape during the mid-twentieth century and its persistence today as a land separate and unequal. Asch, who spent nearly a decade in Mississippi as an educator, offers a fresh look at the South's troubled ties to the cotton industry, the long struggle for civil rights, and unrelenting social and economic injustice through the eyes of two of the era's most important and intriguing figures.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 10: Law and Politics

Author: James W. Ely Jr.,Bradley G. Bond

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469616742

Category: Reference

Page: 456

View: 6620

Volume 10 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture combines two of the sections from the original edition, adding extensive updates and 53 entirely new articles. In the law section of this volume, 16 longer essays address broad concepts ranging from law schools to family law, from labor relations to school prayer. The 43 topical entries focus on specific legal cases and individuals, including historical legal professionals, parties from landmark cases, and even the fictional character Atticus Finch, highlighting the roles these individuals have played in shaping the identity of the region. The politics section includes 34 essays on matters such as Reconstruction, social class and politics, and immigration policy. New essays reflect the changing nature of southern politics, away from the one-party system long known as the "solid South" to the lively two-party politics now in play in the region. Seventy shorter topical entries cover individual politicians, political thinkers, and activists who have made significant contributions to the shaping of southern politics.

Carolina Israelite

How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights

Author: Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469621045

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 6348

This first comprehensive biography of Jewish American writer and humorist Harry Golden (1903-1981)--author of the 1958 national best-seller Only in America--illuminates a remarkable life intertwined with the rise of the civil rights movement, Jewish popular culture, and the sometimes precarious position of Jews in the South and across America during the 1950s. After recounting Golden's childhood on New York's Lower East Side, Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett points to his stint in prison as a young man, after a widely publicized conviction for investment fraud during the Great Depression, as the root of his empathy for the underdog in any story. During World War II, the cigar-smoking, bourbon-loving raconteur landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, and founded the Carolina Israelite newspaper, which was published into the 1960s. Golden's writings on race relations and equal rights attracted a huge popular readership. Golden used his celebrity to editorialize for civil rights as the momentous story unfolded. He charmed his way into friendships and lively correspondence with Carl Sandburg, Adlai Stevenson, Robert Kennedy, and Billy Graham, among other notable Americans, and he appeared on the Tonight Show as well as other national television programs. Hartnett's spirited chronicle captures Golden's message of social inclusion for a new audience today.

Klansville, U.S.A.

The Rise and Fall of the Civil Rights-Era Ku Klux Klan

Author: David Cunningham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199911088

Category: Social Science

Page: 360

View: 6079

In the 1960s, on the heels of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision and in the midst of the growing Civil Rights Movement, Ku Klux Klan activity boomed, reaching an intensity not seen since the 1920s, when the KKK boasted over 4 million members. Most surprisingly, the state with the largest Klan membership-more than the rest of the South combined-was North Carolina, a supposed bastion of southern-style progressivism. Klansville, U.S.A. is the first substantial history of the civil rights-era KKK's astounding rise and fall, focusing on the under-explored case of the United Klans of America (UKA) in North Carolina. Why the UKA flourished in the Tar Heel state presents a fascinating puzzle and a window into the complex appeal of the Klan as a whole. Drawing on a range of new archival sources and interviews with Klan members, including state and national leaders, the book uncovers the complex logic of KKK activity. David Cunningham demonstrates that the Klan organized most successfully where whites perceived civil rights reforms to be a significant threat to their status, where mainstream outlets for segregationist resistance were lacking, and where the policing of the Klan's activities was lax. Moreover, by connecting the Klan to the more mainstream segregationist and anti-communist groups across the South, Cunningham provides valuable insight into southern conservatism, its resistance to civil rights, and the region's subsequent dramatic shift to the Republican Party. Klansville, U.S.A. illuminates a period of Klan history that has been largely ignored, shedding new light on organized racism and on how political extremism can intersect with mainstream institutions and ideals.

A History of African-American Leadership

Author: John White,Bruce J. Dierenfield

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317866231

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 9242

The story of black emancipation is one of the most dramatic themes of American history, covering racism, murder, poverty and extreme heroism. Figures such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King are the demigods of the freedom movements, both film and household figures. This major text explores the African-American experience of the twentieth century with particular reference to six outstanding race leaders. Their philosophies and strategies for racial advancement are compared and set against the historical framework and constraints within which they functioned. The book also examines the 'grass roots' of black protest movements in America, paying particular attention to the major civil rights organizations as well as black separatist groups such as the Nation of Islam.

Der Informant

Deep Throat - die geheime Quelle der Watergate-Enthüller

Author: Bob Woodward

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783548368658

Category: Political corruption

Page: 222

View: 4349

Red to Blue

Congressman Chris Van Hollen and Grassroots Politics

Author: Sanford Gottlieb

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317253078

Category: Political Science

Page: 192

View: 9684

With a close eye on a rising star in the Democratic party, Congressman Chris Van Hollen, this book examines the movement toward a Democratic majority in American politics. Van Hollen, a state senator from suburban Maryland, was one of only two Democrats to defeat an incumbent Republican House member in the Republican sweep of 2002, the first congressional election after 9/11. He did it with the assistance of a grassroots army attracted by his outstanding leadership on progressive issues in the Maryland legislature and determined to "take back the House" from an increasingly right-wing Republican Party. The author had an inside view of Van Hollen's 2002 victory as campaign coordinator of his precinct. Gottlieb provides a detailed account of the nuts and bolts and spirit of the Van Hollen campaign and extends his analysis into 2008, the election year for which Nancy Pelosi appointed Van Hollen chief of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, responsible for recruiting, assisting, and mentoring candidates in an effort to expand the Democratic majority in the House. Grassroots politics is a key to the Democrats' progress, whether at the congressional or presidential level. Chris Van Hollen points the way to achieving new alignments that could help move the country from red to blue. Including hundreds of interviews with voters, activists, candidates, campaign staffers, members of Congress, pollsters, journalists, and scholars, Red to Blue provides a nuanced understanding of America's shifting politics.

The Underdog in American Politics

The Democratic Party and Liberal Values

Author: K. Trautman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230107702

Category: Political Science

Page: 265

View: 2447

One major party in American politics, the Democrats, has consciously identified itself with underdogs. This book analyzes the relationship between the party and the main political ideology of its base: liberalism.

The Awful Grace of God

Religious Terrorism, White Supremacy, and the Unsolved Murder of Martin Luther King Jr.

Author: Stuart Wexler,Larry Hancock

Publisher: Catapult

ISBN: 1619020750

Category: History

Page: 446

View: 6569

An in-depth examination of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination using declassified documents to reveal a secret right-wing terrorist network. The Awful Grace of God examines America’s most violent right-wing extremists, including Sam Bowers, head of the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan of Mississippi; J.B. Stoner, founder of the National States’ Rights Party; and Reverend Wesley Swift, founder of the Church of Jesus Christ Christian, who are the likely culprits behind the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on April 4, 1968. Hancock and Wexler have sifted through thousands of pages of newly declassified law enforcement files on the King murder, conducted dozens of interviews with figures of the period, and re-examined information from several recent cold case investigations. Their research shed new light on the terrorist network built by these racist militant groups. The data they found—previously unavailable to congressional investigators—as well as the new data-mining techniques they employed will provide a roadmap for future investigation. “A timely study.” —Kirkus Reviews “A step in the [right] direction of a better understanding of a national tragedy.” —Booklist

Kaiser Wilhelm I.

Der letzte Preuße

Author: Franz Herre

Publisher: Kiepenheuer & Witsch

ISBN: 3462410717

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 544

View: 8215

Die vorliegende Biographie zeichnet ein Gesamtbild des Menschen und Monarchen Wilhelm I. und liefert zugleich eine Darstellung der Reichsgründung, die nicht aus der Perspektive Bismarcks, sondern aus der Sicht Wilhelms beschrieben wird, der dabei Profil gewinnt: als letzter König von Preußen, der diesen Namen verdiente.

Landmark Debates in Congress

From the Declaration of Independence to the War in Iraq

Author: Stephen W. Stathis

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 514

View: 1817

Examines more than fifty significant congressional debates, arranged in chronological order and accompanied by introductory essays that outline the opposing forces and historical context of each debate.

Lyndon B. Johnson and the Transformation of American Politics

Author: John L. Bullion

Publisher: Longman

ISBN: 9780321383259

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 260

View: 8534

This newest edition to the Library of American Biography Series by John L. Bullion introduces students to the dynamic and turbulent life and legacy of President Lyndon B. Johnson. Johnson navigated the country through some of the most challenging issues of the 20th century. This volume offers a close look at not only how Johnson handled the issues of civil rights, segregation, Vietnam, and an unruly economy, but also demonstrates how these same issues and events wore away Johnson's once robust idealism. The titles in the Library of American Biography Series make ideal supplements for American History Survey courses or other courses in American history where figures in history are explored. Paperback, brief, and inexpensive, each interpretative biography in this series focuses on a figure whose actions and ideas significantly influenced the course of American history and national life. At the same time, each biography relates the life of its subject to the broader themes and developments of the times.