In the News

American Journalists View Their Craft

Author: Jerry W. Knudson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 291

View: 860

This book provides rare and candid insights by those who experienced the reality of meeting a deadline and the pressures of space limitations and access to information. Knudson has crafted a seamless narrative of journalism in America by tying together his own keen commentary on the evolution of news reporting with brief excerpts from those who actually did the reporting, from colonial times through the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Students will hear what the following notable journalists had to say about their craft and the coverage of contemporary events: Benjamin Franklin's ambivalence about the colonial press: extolling the 'watchdog' concept of newspapers, while abhorring the rough-and-tumble personal journalism of his day; Frederick Douglass's vivid and literary description of his 1847 interview with John Brown; Ida B. Wells' account of how her small newspaper, a beacon for many African Ameri-cans, was destroyed by an angry mob in 1892; Ida Tarbell's description of her meeting with John D. Rockefeller; Richard Harding Davis's 1911 Collier's excerpt, in which he laments the shift from the resourceful and ingenious traditional correspondent to the thundering mob of reporters who descended on any event of significance; Martha Gellhorn's experiences as a journalist who covered World War II for Collier's; Ernie Pyle's portrait of what it was like to be a correspondent slogging with the troops through the Italian campaign in World War II; David Brinkley recounting what it was like to be a veteran reporter during the JFK assassination and funeral; The Washington Post's Vice President and Executive Editor Ben Bradlee discussing the impact of Watergate on news reporting; Molly Ivins, a Texas journalist whose first collection of columns remained on The New York Times bestseller list for over 12 months, writes about media critici

Quote/unquote

Quotations on freedom of speech, journalism, the news media and a world or words

Author: Lizette Rabe

Publisher: AFRICAN SUN MeDIA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 218

View: 630

Journalists live in a magical world of words – to inform, to educate, and to entertain; to enlighten, to brighten, update, edify, amuse, tickle, distract and interest the likely and unlikely reader/listener/viewer/user. This collection consists of quotable and not so quotable quotes on journalists and the world of words, representing the art and craft and profession and fine calling of journalistic writing, from the prehistory of journalistic civilisation to the current everything-goes cyber universe.

Changing the News

The Forces Shaping Journalism in Uncertain Times

Author: Wilson Lowrey

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 564

Changing the News examines the difficulties in changing news processes and practices in response to the evolving circumstances and struggles of the journalism industry. The editors have put together this volume to demonstrate why the prescriptions employed to salvage the journalism industry to date haven’t worked, and to explain how constraints and pressures have influenced the field’s responses to challenges in an uncertain, changing environment. If journalism is to adjust and thrive, the following questions need answers: Why do journalists and news organizations respond to uncertainties in the ways they do? What forces and structures constrain these responses? What social and cultural contexts should we take into account when we judge whether or not journalism successfully responds and adapts? The book tackles these questions from varying perspectives and levels of analysis, through chapters by scholars of news sociology and media management. Changing the News details the forces that shape and challenge journalism and journalistic culture, and explains why journalists and their organizations respond to troubles, challenges and uncertainties in the way they do.

Women Who Made the News

Female Journalists in Canada, 1880-1945

Author: Marjory Lang

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 371

View: 423

However, by providing news about women for women they made a distinctly female culture visible within newspapers, chronicling the increasing participation of women in public affairs. Women Who Made the News is the remarkable story of the achievements of those journalists who helped raise women's awareness of each other in the period ending with World War II."--BOOK JACKET.

The Future of Journalism in the Advanced Democracies

Author: Geoff Ward

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 310

View: 685

What are the current problems, pressures and opportunities facing journalists in advanced democratic societies? Has there been a 'dumbing down' of the news agenda? How can serious political, economic and social news be made interesting to young people? This book explores the current challenges faced by those working in the news media, focusing especially on the responsibilities of journalism in the advanced democracies. The authors comprise experienced journalists and academics from the UK and the other countries investigated. In the opening section they investigate the key issues facing twenty-first century journalism; while in section two they offer in-depth studies of the UK news media, discussing national newspapers; regional and local newspapers, both paid for and free; terrestrial, satellite and cable television news; radio news and online journalism. These detailed analyses provide the basis for a comparison with the media of a variety of other key advanced democracies: namely the USA, France, Germany, Italy and Japan. Drawing on this evidence, the authors map out possible future developments, paying attention to their likely global impact. The book's provocative conclusions will provide the groundwork for continuing debate amongst journalists, scholars and policy-makers concerned about the place of journalism in invigorating political processes and democratic functions.

The News Interview

Journalists and Public Figures on the Air

Author: Steven Clayman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 372

View: 240

This much-needed work examines the place of the news interview in Anglo-American society as well as its historical development.

Keywords in News and Journalism Studies

Author: Barbie Zelizer

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 180

View: 383

Annotation. This comprehensive glossary offers clear and insightful definitions of the most significant keywords in news and journalism studies. Ranging from 'above the fold' to 'zinger', and with over 400 terms in between, it covers words associated with newspapers, radio and television news, magazines, photojournalism and internet reporting. Other examples include 'agenda setting', 'libel', 'news values', 'objectivity,' 'scoop' and 'tabloidization'. Written by two of the field's leading scholars, it offers an informed perspective on the key terms. It considers a range of genres, including business, crime, environmental, fashion, lifestyle, investigative, science, sports and war journalism as well as looking at new alternatives such as 'Wikinews' and 'Twitter'. This lively and engaging treatment will provide students, researchers and journalists with a solid grounding in the fast-moving vocabulary of news and journalism studies.

News and Journalism in the UK

Author: Brian McNair

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 272

View: 485

News and Journalism in the UK is an accessible and comprehensive introduction to the political, economic and regulatory environments of press and broadcast journalism in Britain and Northern Ireland. Surveying the industry in a period of radical economic and technological change, Brian McNair examines the main trends in journalistic media in the last two decades and assesses the challenges and future of the industry in the new millennium. Integrating both academic and journalistic perspectives on journalism, topics addressed in this revised and updated edition include: *'tabloidization', Americanization and the supposed 'dumbing down' of journalistic standards *changing work patterns and the feminization of journalism *trends in media ownership and editorial allegiances *the impact of technological innovations such as digitalization, online media and 24 hour news *the implications of devolution for regional journalists.

The News About the News

American Journalism in Peril

Author: Leonard Downie, Jr.

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 493

Freedom of the press is a primary American value. Good journalism builds communities, arms citizens with important information, and serves as a public watchdog for civic, national, and global issues. But what happens when the news turns its back on its public role? Leonard Downie Jr., executive editor of The Washington Post, and Robert G. Kaiser, associate editor and senior correspondent, report on a growing crisis in American journalism. From the corporatization that leads media moguls to slash content for profit, to newsrooms that ignore global crises to report on personal entertainment, these veteran journalists chronicle an erosion of independent, relevant journalism. In the process, they make clear why incorruptible reporting is crucial to American society. Rooted in interviews and first-hand accounts, the authors take us inside the politically charged world of one of America’s powerful institutions, the media. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Future of Journalism: Developments and Debates

Author: Bob Franklin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 390

View: 630

The Future of Journalism: Developments and Debates analyses the radical shifts in journalism which are changing every aspect of the gathering, reporting and reception of news. The drivers of these changes include the rapid innovations in communication technologies, the competitive and fragmenting markets for audiences and advertising revenues, and the collapse of traditional business models for financing media organisations, as well as changing audience requirements for news, the ways in which it is presented and the expansive number of (increasingly mobile) devices on which it is produced and consumed. Each of these trends has significant implications for journalists - for their jobs, workplaces, products and perceptions of their professional roles, ethical judgements and day-to-day practice. They also pose significant challenges for the future funding of a sustainable, critical and high ‘quality’ democratic journalism. The Future of Journalism: Developments and Debates comprises the research-based responses of distinguished academic specialists and professional journalists to the challenging issues involved in assessing the future of journalism. It is essential reading for everyone interested in the changing role of journalism in the economic, democratic and cultural life of communities locally, nationally and globally. This book was originally published as two special issues of Journalism Studies and Journalism Practice.