California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones,Kathryn A. Klar

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN: 0759113742

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 5726

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

The Oxford Companion to Archaeology

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195076184

Category: Religion

Page: 844

View: 8025

Features articles written by archaeology scholars on such topics as bog bodies, underwater archaeology, the Pyramids of Giza, and the Valley of the Kings

The Lifeways of Hunter-Gatherers

The Foraging Spectrum

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107355095

Category: Social Science

Page: N.A

View: 7296

In this book, Robert L. Kelly challenges the preconceptions that hunter-gatherers were Paleolithic relics living in a raw state of nature, instead crafting a position that emphasizes their diversity, and downplays attempts to model the original foraging lifeway or to use foragers to depict human nature stripped to its core. Kelly reviews the anthropological literature for variation among living foragers in terms of diet, mobility, sharing, land tenure, technology, exchange, male-female relations, division of labor, marriage, descent and political organization. Using the paradigm of human behavioral ecology, he analyzes the diversity in these areas and seeks to explain rather than explain away variability, and argues for an approach to prehistory that uses archaeological data to test theory rather than one that uses ethnographic analogy to reconstruct the past.

The Way the Wind Blows

Climate Change, History, and Human Action

Author: Roderick J. McIntosh,Joseph A. Tainter,Susan Keech McIntosh

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231505787

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 2130

Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference. Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

Hunter-gatherer Archaeology as Historical Process

Author: Kenneth E. Sassaman,Donald H. Holly (Jr.)

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 9780816529254

Category: Social Science

Page: 341

View: 7982

Papers from a seminar held in 2008 at the Amerind Foundation in Dragoon, Ariz.

Daily Life during the California Gold Rush

Author: Thomas Maxwell-Long

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313363102

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 1005

This comprehensive narrative history of the California Gold Rush describes daily life during this historic period, documenting its wide-reaching effects and examining the significant individuals and organizations of the time. • Contains excerpts from California Gold Rush diaries and California Gold Rush era publications • Provides a chronology of the events leading up to the Gold Rush, the event itself, and the greater outgrowth of historical change afterwards • Includes maps distinguishing the location of the mining towns during the California Gold Rush as well as provocative vintage images from the Gold Rush era • An extensive bibliography provides primary and secondary sources on the Gold Rush • A comprehensive glossary defines Gold Rush terms

Human Expeditions

Inspired by Bruce Trigger

Author: Stephen Chrisomalis,André Costopoulos

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442664568

Category: Social Science

Page: 316

View: 2387

In its 2007 obituary of Bruce Trigger (1937–2006), the Times of London referred to the Canadian anthropologist and archaeologist as “Canada’s leading prehistorian” and “one of the most influential archaeologists of his time.” Trained at Yale University and a faculty member at McGill University for more than forty years, he was best known for his History of Archaeological Thought, which the Times called “monumental.” Trigger inspired scholars all over the world through his questioning of assumptions and his engagement with social and political causes. Human Expeditions pays tribute to Trigger’s immense legacy by bringing together cutting edge work from internationally recognized and emerging researchers inspired by his example. Covering the length and breadth of Trigger’s wide-ranging interests – from Egyptology to the history of archaeological theory to North American aboriginal cultures – this volume highlights the diversity of his academic work and the magnitude of his impact in many different areas of scholarship.

Hearing the voices of GRT communities

Inclusive community development

Author: Ryder, Andrew,Cemlyn, Sarah

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 1447313593

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 3357

Over the past decade, interest in Gypsies, Roma and Travellers (GRT) has risen up the political and media agendas, but they remain relatively unknown. This topical book is the first to chart the history and contemporary developments in GRT community activism, and the community and voluntary organisations and coalitions which support it. Underpinned by radical community development and equality theories, it describes the communities' struggle for rights against a backdrop of intense intersectional discrimination across Europe, and critiques the ambivalent role of community development in fostering these campaigns. Much of it co-written by community activists, it is a vehicle for otherwise marginalised voices, and an essential resource and inspiration for practitioners, lecturers, researchers and members of GRT communities.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 9781607320234

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 9024

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology is a guide for the design of archaeological experiments for both students and scholars. Experimental archaeology provides a unique opportunity to corroborate conclusions with multiple trials of repeatable experiments and can provide data otherwise unavailable to archaeologists without damaging sites, remains, or artifacts. Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture-ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology-detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures and are placed in a theoretical context, and contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. The field has long been in need of a guide that focuses on methodology and design. This book fills that need not only for undergraduate and graduate students but for any archaeologist looking to begin an experimental research project.

Tending the Wild

Native American Knowledge and the Management of California's Natural Resources

Author: M. Kat Anderson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520933109

Category: Social Science

Page: 555

View: 5253

John Muir was an early proponent of a view we still hold today—that much of California was pristine, untouched wilderness before the arrival of Europeans. But as this groundbreaking book demonstrates, what Muir was really seeing when he admired the grand vistas of Yosemite and the gold and purple flowers carpeting the Central Valley were the fertile gardens of the Sierra Miwok and Valley Yokuts Indians, modified and made productive by centuries of harvesting, tilling, sowing, pruning, and burning. Marvelously detailed and beautifully written, Tending the Wild is an unparalleled examination of Native American knowledge and uses of California's natural resources that reshapes our understanding of native cultures and shows how we might begin to use their knowledge in our own conservation efforts. M. Kat Anderson presents a wealth of information on native land management practices gleaned in part from interviews and correspondence with Native Americans who recall what their grandparents told them about how and when areas were burned, which plants were eaten and which were used for basketry, and how plants were tended. The complex picture that emerges from this and other historical source material dispels the hunter-gatherer stereotype long perpetuated in anthropological and historical literature. We come to see California's indigenous people as active agents of environmental change and stewardship. Tending the Wild persuasively argues that this traditional ecological knowledge is essential if we are to successfully meet the challenge of living sustainably.

Thicker Than Water

The Origins of Blood as Symbol and Ritual

Author: Melissa Meyer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135342075

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 4082

Blood is more than a fluid solution of cells, platelets and plasma. It is a symbol for the most basic of human concerns--life, death and family find expression in rituals surrounding everything from menstruation to human sacrifice. Comprehensive in its scope and provocative in its argument, this book examines beliefs and rituals concerning blood in a range of regional and religious contexts throughout human history. Meyer reveals the origins of a wide range of blood rituals, from the earliest surviving human symbolism of fertility and the hunt, to the Jewish bris, and the clitoridectomies given to young girls in parts of Africa. The book also explores how cultural practices influence gene selection and makes a connection with the natural sciences by exploring how color perception influences the human proclivity to create blood symbols and rituals.

Supply-Side Sustainability

Author: Timothy F. H. Allen,Joseph A. Tainter,Thomas W. Hoekstra

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231504071

Category: Science

Page: 440

View: 3430

While environmentalists insist that lower rates of consumption of natural resources are essential for a sustainable future, many economists dismiss the notion that resource limits act to constrain modern, creative societies. The conflict between these views tinges political debate at all levels and hinders our ability to plan for the future. Supply-Side Sustainability offers a fresh approach to this dilemma by integrating ecological and social science approaches in an interdisciplinary treatment of sustainability. Written by two ecologists and an anthropologist, this book discusses organisms, landscapes, populations, communities, biomes, the biosphere, ecosystems and energy flows, as well as patterns of sustainability and collapse in human societies, from hunter-gatherer groups to empires to today's industrial world. These diverse topics are integrated within a new framework that translates the authors' advances in hierarchy and complexity theory into a form useful to professionals in science, government, and business. The result is a much-needed blueprint for a cost-effective management regime, one that makes problem-solving efforts themselves sustainable over time. The authors demonstrate that long-term, cost-effective resource management can be achieved by managing the contexts of productive systems, rather than by managing the commodities that natural systems produce.

Pox Americana

The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82

Author: Elizabeth A. Fenn

Publisher: Hill and Wang

ISBN: 1466808047

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7276

The astonishing, hitherto unknown truths about a disease that transformed the United States at its birth A horrifying epidemic of smallpox was sweeping across the Americas when the American Revolution began, and yet we know almost nothing about it. Elizabeth A. Fenn is the first historian to reveal how deeply variola affected the outcome of the war in every colony and the lives of everyone in North America. By 1776, when military action and political ferment increased the movement of people and microbes, the epidemic worsened. Fenn's remarkable research shows us how smallpox devastated the American troops at Québec and kept them at bay during the British occupation of Boston. Soon the disease affected the war in Virginia, where it ravaged slaves who had escaped to join the British forces. During the terrible winter at Valley Forge, General Washington had to decide if and when to attempt the risky inoculation of his troops. In 1779, while Creeks and Cherokees were dying in Georgia, smallpox broke out in Mexico City, whence it followed travelers going north, striking Santa Fe and outlying pueblos in January 1781. Simultaneously it moved up the Pacific coast and east across the plains as far as Hudson's Bay. The destructive, desolating power of smallpox made for a cascade of public-health crises and heartbreaking human drama. Fenn's innovative work shows how this mega-tragedy was met and what its consequences were for America.

Encyclopedia of Prehistory

Volume 6: North America

Author: Peter N. Peregrine,Melvin Ember

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9780306462603

Category: Social Science

Page: 509

View: 1806

The Encyclopedia of Prehistory represents temporal dimension. Major traditions are an attempt to provide basic information also defined by a somewhat different set of on all archaeologically known cultures, sociocultural characteristics than are eth covering the entire globe and the entire nological cultures. Major traditions are prehistory of humankind. It is designed as defined based on common subsistence a tool to assist in doing comparative practices, sociopolitical organization, and research on the peoples of the past. Most material industries, but language, ideology, of the entries are written by the world's and kinship ties play little or no part in foremost experts on the particular areas their definition because they are virtually and time periods. unrecoverable from archaeological con The Encyclopedia is organized accord texts. In contrast, language, ideology, and ing to major traditions. A major tradition kinship ties are central to defining ethno is defined as a group of populations sharing logical cultures.

Archaeology

Author: Robert L. Kelly,David Hurst Thomas

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 1133707831

Category: Social Science

Page: 512

View: 7707

This text pairs two of archaeology's most recognized names: Robert L. Kelly and David Hurst Thomas, who together have over seventy years of experience leading excavations. The sixth edition of ARCHAEOLOGY reflects the most recent research and changes in the field, while covering core concepts in an exceptionally student-friendly fashion by using personalized examples and high-interest topics. This edition continues a tradition of combining academic rigor with an engaging writing style that has made Kelly and Thomas's ARCHAEOLOGY one of the most well-respected and best-selling texts in the discipline. The rich array of supplemental resources includes a book companion website, as well as the option to use the authors' DOING FIELDWORK: ARCHAEOLOGICAL DEMONSTRATIONS 2.0 CD-ROM. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Catalysts to complexity

late Holocene societies of the California coast

Author: Jon Erlandson,Terry L. Jones,Jeanne E. Arnold,Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA.

Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 377

View: 7635

Essays in this volume explore the last three and one half millennia of the long history of the California Coast, focusing on the archaeological signatures of emergent cultural complexity. Organized geographically, they provide a mosaic of archaeological, historic, and ethnographic findings that illuminate cultural changes over time. To explain these Late Holocene cultural developments, the authors address issues ranging from culture history, paleoenvironments, settlement, subsistence, exchange, ritual, power, to division of labor, and employ both ecological and post-modern perspectives. Complex cultural expressions, most highly developed in the Santa Barbara Channel and the North Coast, are viewed alternatively as fairly recent and abrupt responses to environmental flux or the end-product of gradual progressions that began earlier in the Holocene.

The Archaeology of the Eastern Nevada Paleoarchaic

The Sunshine Locality

Author: Charlotte Beck,George Thomas Jones

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 262

View: 1424

The Sunshine Locality in the geographic center of the Great Basin is the focus of this volume of historical research and recent archeological studies including analyses of sedimentary textures and structure, depositional processes and chronology, faunal remains used to evaluate local and regional environmental changes, and a few hypothesis to unresolved questions about the paleoenvironmental resources at this rich and unique site.

Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions

New Perspectives from Archaeology and Ethnohistory

Author: Lee Panich,Tsim Schneider

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN: 0816530513

Category: Social Science

Page: 264

View: 2723

Indigenous Landscapes and Spanish Missions offers a holistic view on the consequences of mission enterprises and how native peoples actively incorporated Spanish colonialism into their own landscapes. An innovative reorientation spanning the northern limits of Spanish colonialism, this volume brings together a variety of archaeologists focused on placing indigenous agency in the foreground of mission interpretation.