Jews in the Gym

Judaism, Sports, and Athletics

Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 1557536295

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 5015

For some, the connection between Jews and athletics might seem far-fetched. But in fact, as is highlighted by the fourteen chapters in this collection, Jews have been participating in -- and thinking about -- sports for more than two thousand years. The articles in this volume scan a wide chronological range: from the Hellenistic period (first century BCE) to the most recent basketball season. The range of athletes covered is equally broad: from participants in Roman-style games to wrestlers, boxers, fencers, baseball players, and basketball stars. The authors of these essays, many of whom actively participate in athletics themselves, raise a number of intriguing questions, such as: What differing attitudes toward sports have Jews exhibited across periods and cultures? Is it possible to be a "good Jew" and a "great athlete"? In what sports have Jews excelled, and why? How have Jews overcome prejudices on the part of the general populace against a Jewish presence on the field or in the ring? In what ways has Jewish participation in sports aided, or failed to aid, the perception of Jews as "good Germans," "good Hungarians," "good Americans," and so forth? This volume, which features a number of illustrations (many of them quite rare), is not only accessible to the general reader, but also contains much information of interest to the scholar in Jewish studies, American studies, and sports history.

Jews and Judaism in World History

Author: Howard N. Lupovitch

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135189641

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 5773

This book is a survey of the history of the Jewish people from biblical antiquity to the present, spanning nearly 2,500 years and traversing five continents. Opening with a broad introduction which addresses key questions of terminology and definition, the book’s ten chapters then go on to explore Jewish history in both its religious and non-religious dimensions. The book explores the social, political and cultural aspects of Jewish history, and examines the changes and continuities across the whole of the Jewish world throughout its long and varied history. Topics covered include: the emergence of Judaism as a religion and way of life the development during the Middle Ages of Judaism as an all-encompassing identity the effect on Jewish life and identity of major changes in Europe and the Islamic world from the mid sixteenth through the end of the nineteenth century the complexity of Jewish life in the twentieth century, the challenge of anti-semitism and the impact of the Holocaust, and the emergence of the current centres of World Jewry in the State of Israel and the New World.

New York Sports

Glamour and Grit in the Empire City

Author: Stephen Norwood

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 1610756355

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 410

View: 610

New York has long been both America’s leading cultural center and its sports capital, with far more championship teams, intracity World Series, and major prizefights than any other city. Pro football’s “Greatest Game Ever Played” took place in New York, along with what was arguably history’s most significant boxing match, the 1938 title bout between Joe Louis and Max Schmeling. As the nation’s most crowded city, basketball proved to be an ideal sport, and for many years it was the site of the country’s most prestigious college basketball tournament. New York boasts storied stadiums, arenas, and gymnasiums and is the home of one of the world’s two leading marathons as well as the Belmont Stakes, the third event in horse racing’s Triple Crown. New York sportswriters also wield national influence and have done much to connect sports to larger social and cultural issues, and the vitality and distinctiveness of New York’s street games, its ethnic institutions, and its sports-centered restaurants and drinking establishments all contribute to the city’s uniqueness. New York Sports collects the work of fourteen leading sport historians, providing new insight into the social and cultural history of America’s major metropolis and of the United States. These writers address the topics of changing conceptions of manhood and violence, leisure and social class, urban night life and entertainment, women and athletics, ethnicity and assimilation, and more.

Jews in the Gym

Judaism, Sports, and Athletics

Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN: 1557536295

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 7869

For some, the connection between Jews and athletics might seem far-fetched. But in fact, as is highlighted by the fourteen chapters in this collection, Jews have been participating in -- and thinking about -- sports for more than two thousand years. The articles in this volume scan a wide chronological range: from the Hellenistic period (first century BCE) to the most recent basketball season. The range of athletes covered is equally broad: from participants in Roman-style games to wrestlers, boxers, fencers, baseball players, and basketball stars. The authors of these essays, many of whom actively participate in athletics themselves, raise a number of intriguing questions, such as: What differing attitudes toward sports have Jews exhibited across periods and cultures? Is it possible to be a "good Jew" and a "great athlete"? In what sports have Jews excelled, and why? How have Jews overcome prejudices on the part of the general populace against a Jewish presence on the field or in the ring? In what ways has Jewish participation in sports aided, or failed to aid, the perception of Jews as "good Germans," "good Hungarians," "good Americans," and so forth? This volume, which features a number of illustrations (many of them quite rare), is not only accessible to the general reader, but also contains much information of interest to the scholar in Jewish studies, American studies, and sports history.

Jewish Culture and Society Under the Christian Roman Empire

Author: Richard Lee Kalmin,Seth Schwartz

Publisher: Peeters Publishers

ISBN: 9789042911819

Category: History

Page: 485

View: 3235

This book investigates the complexity, diversity, uniqueness and enduring significance of Jewish life in the Christian Roman Empire, from 312 to 634 C.E. During this period there occurred an unprecedented Jewish cultural explosion, encompassing the compilation and/or composition of such texts as the Palestinian Talmud, the main aggadic midrashim, an extensive magical/mystical literature, the revived apocalypse, a vast corpus of piyyutim and the beginnings of a practically oriented halakhic literature. Furthermore, this was the era of the florition of Jewish art, for it was only in the fourth century that a specifically Jewish iconographic language came into common use in synagogues and catacombs, the archaeological remains of almost all of which date from this period. This volume moves toward a synthesizing and contextualizing view of the Jewish cultural production of late antiquity, examining the interaction of Jews, Christians and pagans and with the emergence of new religious forms generated by such interaction.

The Jews in Poland and Russia: 1881-1914

Author: Antony Polonsky

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: 9781904113836

Category: History

Page: 518

View: 2968

Moshe Rosman presents a cogent and critical argument for the considerations that must be brought to bear on the writing of Jewish history today. By highlighting in one book the issues raised by postmodernism, How Jewish is Jewish History? considers the questions that Jewish historians must confront if their work is to be taken seriously by mainstream intellectuals, or indeed by educated Jews interested in understanding their own cultural and historical past. The major cultural, ideological, and social changes that have occurred in Europe in the past century have generated widespread reassessment of European history in terms of its presuppositions, its methodologies, its directions, its emphases, and its scope. This timely volume looks at the Jewish past in the spirit of this reassessment, It points to a new framework for the study of Jewish history and helps to contextualize it within the mainstream of historical scholarship. The family and the community, which were in a very real sense the core institutions of east European Jewish society, underwent very rapid change in the nineteenth century. The essays in this volume look at the past through the prism of the lives of ordinary people, with results that are sometimes surprising, and always stimulating. The topics they treat are varied, but the concern to explain what lay behind the visible reality is common to all of them. In Three-Volume History, Antony Polonsky provides a comprehensive survey---socio-political, economic, and religious---of the Jewish communities of eastern Europe from 1350 to the present. Until the Second World War, this was the heartland of the Jewish world: nearly three and a half million Jews lived in Poland alone, while nearly three million more lived in the Soviet Union. Although the majority of the Jews of Europe and the United States, and many of the Jews of Israel, originate from these lands, their history there is not well known. Rather, it is the subject of mythologizing and stereotypes that fail both to bring out the specific features of the Jewish civilization which emerged there and to illustrate what was lost. Jewish life, though often poor materially, was marked by a high degree of spiritual and ideological intensity and creativity. Antony Polonsky recreates this lost world---brutally cut down by the Holocaust and less brutally but still seriously damaged by the Soviet attempt to destroy Jewish culture. Wherever possible, the unfolding of history is illustrated by contemporary Jewish writings to show how Jews felt and reacted to the complex and difficult situations in which they found themselves. This second volume covers the period from 1881 to 1914. It considers the deterioration in the position of the Jews during that time and the new political and cultural movements that developed as a consequence: Zionism, socialism, autonomism, the emergence of modern Hebrew and Yiddish literature, Jewish urbanization, and the rise of popular Jewish culture. Galicia, Prussian Poland, the Kingdom of Poland, and the tsarist empire are all treated individually, as are the main towns of these areas. Volume I covers the period 1350-1881; Volume 3 covers 1914-2005.

Hebrews of the Portuguese Nation

Conversos and Community in Early Modern Amsterdam

Author: Miriam Bodian

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253213518

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 687

In the 17th century, descendants of forcibly baptised Jews (conversos) fled the Iberian Inquisitions to settle in Amsterdam, a city renowned for its commercial ties and religious tolerance. On arrival the conversos lacked clear ethnic or religious identities and had little social organisation. Yet, they formed the nucleus of what became within a generation a strongly cohesive community with a highly structured and well-developed sense of its Jewish identity. Drawing on family and communal records, diaries, memoirs, literary works, and other sources, Miriam Bodian reconstructs the fascinating story of how these Portuguese immigrant--merchants, professionals, and intellectuals, For the most part--reasserted their Judaism, while maintaining their Iberian heritage.

Capitalism and the Jews

Author: Jerry Z. Muller

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400834368

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 6656

The unique historical relationship between capitalism and the Jews is crucial to understanding modern European and Jewish history. But the subject has been addressed less often by mainstream historians than by anti-Semites or apologists. In this book Jerry Muller, a leading historian of capitalism, separates myth from reality to explain why the Jewish experience with capitalism has been so important and complex--and so ambivalent. Drawing on economic, social, political, and intellectual history from medieval Europe through contemporary America and Israel, Capitalism and the Jews examines the ways in which thinking about capitalism and thinking about the Jews have gone hand in hand in European thought, and why anticapitalism and anti-Semitism have frequently been linked. The book explains why Jews have tended to be disproportionately successful in capitalist societies, but also why Jews have numbered among the fiercest anticapitalists and Communists. The book shows how the ancient idea that money was unproductive led from the stigmatization of usury and the Jews to the stigmatization of finance and, ultimately, in Marxism, the stigmatization of capitalism itself. Finally, the book traces how the traditional status of the Jews as a diasporic merchant minority both encouraged their economic success and made them particularly vulnerable to the ethnic nationalism of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Providing a fresh look at an important but frequently misunderstood subject, Capitalism and the Jews will interest anyone who wants to understand the Jewish role in the development of capitalism, the role of capitalism in the modern fate of the Jews, or the ways in which the story of capitalism and the Jews has affected the history of Europe and beyond, from the medieval period to our own.

Unsettled

An Anthropology of the Jews

Author: Melvin Konner

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 500

View: 7128

An anthropological analysis of the Jewish people and faith draws on archaeological findings, census data, religious texts, literature, and oral history to demonstrate how Jewish factors shaped the world and how the ongoing diaspora led to the rise of Jewish literacy, education, trade, and influence. 25,000 first printing.

Gender and Jewish History

Author: Marion A. Kaplan,Deborah Dash Moore

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 025322263X

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 5850

"A Major Collection of Scholarship that Contains the most up-to-Date, Indeed Cutting-Edge Work on Gender and Jewish History by Several Generations of Top Scholars."---Atina Grossmann, the Cooper Union By Revealing the Importance of gender in interpreting the Jewish past, this collection of original essays highlights the profound influence that feminist scholarship has had on the study of Jewish history since the 1970s. Gender and Jewish History considers the impact of gender on Jewish religious practices and political behavior, educational accomplishments and communal structures, acculturation and choice of occupations. The book stimulates conversations on such topics as Jewish women's creativity and spirituality, violence against women, Jews' reactions to persecution in the Holocaust, and Judaism as lived religion and culture. Honoring Paula E. Hyman, one of the founders of Jewish gender studies, this volume shows gender to be an eye-opening entry into realms of Jewish history previously untouched by it.

Judaism on Trial

Jewish-Christian Disputations in the Middle Ages

Author: Hyam Maccoby

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: 9781874774167

Category: History

Page: 245

View: 567

This book focuses on the major Jewish-Chrisian disputations of medieval Europe: those of Paris (1240), Barcelona (1263), and Tortosa (1413-14).

Jews and Words

Author: Amos Oz,Fania Oz-Salzberger

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300156774

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 160

View: 3963

DIV Why are words so important to so many Jews? Novelist Amos Oz and historian Fania Oz-Salzberger roam the gamut of Jewish history to explain the integral relationship of Jews and words. Through a blend of storytelling and scholarship, conversation and argument, father and daughter tell the tales behind Judaism’s most enduring names, adages, disputes, texts, and quips. These words, they argue, compose the chain connecting Abraham with the Jews of every subsequent generation. Framing the discussion within such topics as continuity, women, timelessness, and individualism, Oz and Oz-Salzberger deftly engage Jewish personalities across the ages, from the unnamed, possibly female author of the Song of Songs through obscure Talmudists to contemporary writers. They suggest that Jewish continuity, even Jewish uniqueness, depends not on central places, monuments, heroic personalities, or rituals but rather on written words and an ongoing debate between the generations. Full of learning, lyricism, and humor, Jews and Words offers an extraordinary tour of the words at the heart of Jewish culture and extends a hand to the reader, any reader, to join the conversation. /div

The Future of the Jews

How Global Forces are Impacting the Jewish People, Israel, and Its Relationship with the United States

Author: Stuart E. Eizenstat

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 144221628X

Category: History

Page: 356

View: 2160

In The Future of the Jews, Stuart E. Eizenstat, a senior diplomat of international reputation, surveys the major geopolitical, economic, and security challenges facing the world in general, and the Jewish world and the United States in particular. These forces include the shift of power and influence from the United States and Europe to the emerging powers in Asia and Latin America; globalization and the new information age; the battle for the direction of the Muslim world; nontraditional security threats; changing demographics, which pose a particular challenge for Jews worldwide and the rise of a new anti-Semitism that seeks to delegitimize Israel as a Jewish state. He also discusses the enduring nature of and challenges to the strategic alliance between the United States and Israel. In an extensive new foreword to the paper edition, Eizenstat addresses crucial developments affecting the Jewish people since the book first appeared in 2012, including increasing tensions in the Middle East, the digital revolution and NSA revelations, declining optimism on the Arab Spring, the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, the revival of anti-Semitism. In addition, he reflects on the changing identify of American Jews as revealed by the Pew Center Survey of U.S. Jews (2013). Eizenstat s provocative analysis will be of interest to everyone concerned about the future of Jews worldwide and in Israel and the United States role in a world that is confronting unprecedented simultaneous, cataclysmic changes."

Jewish Concepts of Scripture

A Comparative Introduction

Author: Benjamin D. Sommer

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814724604

Category: Religion

Page: 347

View: 8795

What do Jews think scripture is? How do the People of the Book conceive of the Book of Books? In what ways is it authoritative? Who has the right to interpret it? Is it divinely or humanly written? And have Jews always thought about the Bible in the same way? In seventeen cohesive and rigorously researched essays, this volume traces the way some of the most important Jewish thinkers throughout history have addressed these questions from the rabbinic era through the medieval Islamic world to modern Jewish scholarship. They address why different Jewish thinkers, writers, and communities have turned to the Bible—and what they expect to get from it. Ultimately, argues editor Benjamin D. Sommer, in understanding the ways Jews construct scripture, we begin to understand the ways Jews construct themselves.

The Jews in Poland and Russia

A Short History

Author: Antony Polonsky

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: 9781906764395

Category: History

Page: 648

View: 3065

The text featured in this edition is abridged from The Jews in Poland and Russia originally published by The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, in 2010.

Life and Loss in the Shadow of the Holocaust

A Jewish Family's Untold Story

Author: Rebecca Boehling,Uta Larkey

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107377692

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 3021

A family's recently discovered correspondence provides the inspiration for this fascinating and deeply moving account of Jewish family life before, during and after the Holocaust. Rebecca Boehling and Uta Larkey reveal how the Kaufmann-Steinberg family was pulled apart under the Nazi regime and dispersed over three continents. The family's unique eight-way correspondence across two generations brings into sharp focus the dilemma of Jews in Nazi Germany facing the painful decisions of when, if and to where they should emigrate. The authors capture the family members' fluctuating emotions of hope, optimism, resignation and despair as well as the day-to-day concerns, experiences and dynamics of family life despite increasing persecution and impending deportation. Headed by two sisters who were among the first female business owners in Essen, the family was far from conventional and their story contributes new dimensions to our understanding of Jewish life in Germany and in exile during these dark years.

Families, Rabbis and Education

Traditional Jewish Society in Nineteenth-century Eastern Europe

Author: Shaul Stampfer

Publisher: Littman Library of Jewish

ISBN: 9781906764531

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 6514

Now available in paperback. *** "This riveting collection of essays covers a breathtaking scope, the amount of research is impressive, and the level of analysis is as refreshing as it is innovative. It is hard to name any other work that covers such a diverse range of fascinating questions in Jewish history in such a learned and professional manner. The author has an uncanny ability to synthesize a diverse range of material with interpretations and analyses that are as brilliant as they are straightforward. This collection will make an excellent companion to extant English and Hebrew language works on modern Jewish history. It will also make for interesting reading in undergraduate classes and graduate seminars on social history, east European history, and Jewish history. In short, this is a gem of a book, the kind that you will want to read, the kind that students will love to read, the kind that scholars as well will not be able to put down." -- Scott Ury, Religious Studies Review, Vol. 38, No. 1, March 2012 *** "For many years, Shaul Stampfer has been recognised as an authority in all things dealing with nineteenth-century Jewish Eastern Europe...[his] focus is not on the purely intellectual debates between rabbinic elites. He is more interested in social history, how average people and in particular women lived. Even his discussions of rabbis emphasize such matters as inheritance of rabbinic positions and the rabbi's role in communal life. His sources are quite broad: traditional rabbinic works as well as Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian texts and newspapers...there is much more that can be said about Stampfer's careful scholarship, which is a treat for all readers." -- Marc B. Shapiro, H-Judaic *** "This book of essays by an exceptionally wide-ranging social and cultural historian is much more than a rich investigation of 'traditional society'." -- Kenneth B. Moss, Journal of Modern History *** "Represents decades of intensive study of Jewish daily life in eastern Europe. The book brings together many of Stampfer's previously published writings, although several appear here in English for the first time...provides us with the oeuvre of a scholar who has spent years thinking about these issues and provides a wonderful context for further study." --- Jeffrey Veidlinger, East European Jewish Affairs *** "Accessible and lively...a good read not only for scholars, but also for general readers interested in seeing just how far we have come from that vanished world." -- Jewish Book World

On Pagans, Jews, and Christians

Author: Arnaldo Momigliano

Publisher: Wesleyan University Press

ISBN: 9780819562180

Category: History

Page: 357

View: 1733

An analysis of the relationships between pagan Greece, imperial Rome, Judaism, and Christianity.

The Jews

A History

Author: John Efron

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315508990

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 1571

The Jews: A History, second edition, explores the religious, cultural, social, and economic diversity of the Jewish people and their faith. The latest edition incorporates new research and includes a broader spectrum of people - mothers, children, workers, students, artists, and radicals - whose perspectives greatly expand the story of Jewish life.

The Everything Torah Book

All You Need To Understand The Basics Of Jewish Law And The Five Books Of The Old Testament

Author: Yaakov Menken

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1440538018

Category: Religion

Page: 304

View: 7420

From the Penteteuch and Nevi'im to the Ketuvim and the oral Torah, this straightforward reference walks you through God's instructions to His people and explains how these teachings are incorporated into Jewish life. The Everything Torah Book presents the tenets of the Jewish faith in an easy-to-understand reference. Fascinating insights into the history, stories, parables, and personalities that are featured in this sacred scripture will bring teachings to life. Regardless of your faith, The Everything Torah Book offers a wonderful insight into Jewish culture. Learn about: Jewish history and heritage What constitutes the Torah The importance of the Torah in the Jewish community How to expand your learning Incorporating teachings into your life Written by a rabbi, The Everything Torah Book presents the tenets of Jewish faith, tradition, and culture in one all-inclusive resource.