Immigration and Work

Author: Jody Agius Vallejo

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 1784416312

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 9970

This volume investigates how larger structural inequalities in sending and receiving nations, immigrant entry policies, group characteristics, and micro level processes, such as discrimination and access to ethnic networks, shapes labor market outcomes, workplace experiences, and patterns of integration among immigrants and their descendants.

Routledge Handbook of Immigration and Refugee Studies

Author: Anna Triandafyllidou

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317638778

Category: Social Science

Page: 390

View: 2418

The Routledge Handbook of Immigration and Refugee Studies offers a comprehensive and unique study of the multi-disciplinary field of international migration and asylum studies. Utilising contemporary information and analysis, this innovative Handbook provides an in depth examination of legal migration management in the labour market and its affect upon families in relation to wider issues of migrant integration and citizenship. With a comprehensive collection of essays written by leading contributors from a broad range of disciplines including sociology of migration, human geography, legal studies, political sciences and economics, the Handbook is a truly multi-disciplinary book approaching the critical questions of: Migration and the labour market Integration and citizenship Migration, families and welfare Irregular migration smuggling and trafficking in human beings asylum and forced migration. Organised into short thematic and geographical chapters the Routledge Handbook of Immigration and Refugee Studies provides a concise overview on the different topics and world regions, as well as useful guidance for both the starting and the more experienced reader. The Handbook’s expansive content and illustrative style will appeal to both students and professionals studying in the field of migration and international organisations.

Doméstica

Immigrant Workers Cleaning and Caring in the Shadows of Affluence

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520933869

Category: Social Science

Page: 318

View: 3064

In this enlightening and timely work, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo highlights the voices, experiences, and views of Mexican and Central American women who care for other people's children and homes, as well as the outlooks of the women who employ them in Los Angeles. The new preface looks at the current issues facing immigrant domestic workers in a global context.

The Slums of Aspen

Immigrants Vs. the Environment in America’s Eden

Author: Lisa Sun-Hee Park,David Naguib Pellow

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479834769

Category: Political Science

Page: 284

View: 5118

Winner, Allan Schnaiberg Outstanding Publication Award, presented by the Environment & Technology section of the American Sociological Association Environmentalism usually calls to mind images of peace and serenity, a oneness with nature, and a shared sense of responsibility. But one town in Colorado, under the guise of environmental protection, passed a resolution limiting immigration, bolstering the privilege of the wealthy and scapegoating Latin American newcomers for the area’s current and future ecological problems. This might have escaped attention save for the fact that this wasn’t some rinky-dink backwater. It was Aspen, Colorado, playground of the rich and famous and the West’s most elite ski town. Tracking the lives of immigrant laborers through several years of exhaustive fieldwork and archival digging, The Slums of Aspen tells a story that brings together some of the most pressing social problems of the day: environmental crises, immigration, and social inequality. Park and Pellow demonstrate how these issues are intertwined in the everyday experiences of people who work and live in this wealthy tourist community. Offering a new understanding of a little known class of the super-elite, of low-wage immigrants (mostly from Latin America) who have become the foundation for service and leisure in this famous resort, and of the recent history of the ski industry, Park and Pellow expose the ways in which Colorado boosters have reshaped the landscape and altered ecosystems in pursuit of profit and pleasure. Of even greater urgency, they frame how environmental degradation and immigration reform have become inextricably linked in many regions of the American West, a dynamic that interferes with the efforts of valorous environmental causes, often turning away from conservation and toward insidious racial privilege.

The Polish Peasant in Europe and America

Author: William Isaac Thomas,Florian Znaniecki

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Peasantry

Page: N.A

View: 5963

Racial Conflicts and Violence in the Labor Market

Roots in the 1919 Steel Strike

Author: Cliff Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131777650X

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 3830

First published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The New Minority

White Working Class Politics in an Age of Immigration and Inequality

Author: Justin Gest

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190632569

Category: Political Science

Page: 272

View: 1763

It wasn't so long ago that the white working class occupied the middle of British and American societies. But today members of the same demographic, feeling silenced and ignored by mainstream parties, have moved to the political margins. In the United States and the United Kingdom, economic disenfranchisement, nativist sentiments and fear of the unknown among this group have even inspired the creation of new right-wing parties and resulted in a remarkable level of support for fringe political candidates, most notably Donald Trump. Answers to the question of how to rebuild centrist coalitions in both the U.S. and U.K. have become increasingly elusive. How did a group of people synonymous with Middle Britain and Middle America drift to the ends of the political spectrum? What drives their emerging radicalism? And what could possibly lead a group with such enduring numerical power to, in many instances, consider themselves a "minority" in the countries they once defined? In The New Minority, Justin Gest speaks to people living in once thriving working class cities--Youngstown, Ohio and Dagenham, England--to arrive at a nuanced understanding of their political attitudes and behaviors. In this daring and compelling book, he makes the case that tension between the vestiges of white working class power and its perceived loss have produced the unique phenomenon of white working class radicalization.

The Labor of Care

Filipina Migrants and Transnational Families in the Digital Age

Author: Valerie Francisco-Menchavez

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252050398

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 4310

For generations, migration moved in one direction at a time: migrants to host countries, and money to families left behind. The Labor of Care argues that globalization has changed all that. Valerie Francisco-Menchavez spent five years alongside a group of working migrant mothers. Drawing on interviews and up-close collaboration with these women, Francisco-Menchavez looks at the sacrifices, emotional and material consequences, and recasting of roles that emerge from family separation. She pays particular attention to how technologies like Facebook, Skype, and recorded video open up transformative ways of bridging distances while still supporting traditional family dynamics. As she shows, migrants also build communities of care in their host countries. These chosen families provide an essential form of mutual support. What emerges is a fascinating portrait of today's transnational family—sundered, yet inexorably linked over the distances by timeless emotions and new forms of intimacy.

Handbook of the Economics of International Migration

Author: Barry Chiswick,Paul Miller

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 044463388X

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 1702

View: 3634

The economic literature on international migration interests policymakers as well as academics throughout the social sciences. These volumes, the first of a new subseries in the Handbooks in Economics, describe and analyze scholarship created since the inception of serious attention began in the late 1970s. This literature appears in the general economics journals, in various field journals in economics (especially, but not exclusively, those covering labor market and human resource issues), in interdisciplinary immigration journals, and in papers by economists published in journals associated with history, sociology, political science, demography, and linguistics, among others. Covers a range of topics from labor market outcomes and fiscal consequences to the effects of international migration on the level and distribution of income – and everything in between. Encompasses a wide range of topics related to migration and is multidisciplinary in some aspects, which is crucial on the topic of migration Appeals to a large community of scholars interested in this topic and for whom no overviews or summaries exist

Work in Transition

Cultural Capital and Highly Skilled Migrants' Passages into the Labour Market

Author: Arnd-Michael Nohl,Karin Schittenhelm,Oliver Schmidtke,Anja Weiss

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN: 1442668741

Category: Political Science

Page: 360

View: 961

Despite the fact that many countries target highly skilled migrants for recruitment in the global labour market, few of those migrants are able to take full advantage of their educational and professional qualifications in their new homes. Work in Transition examines this paradox, using extended narrative interviews that focus on the role that cultural capital plays in the labour market. Comparing the migrant experience in Germany, Canada, and Turkey, Work in Transition shows how migrants develop their cultural capital in order to enter the workforce, as well as how failure to leverage that capital can lead to permanent exclusion from professional positions. Exposing the mechanisms that drive inclusion and exclusion for migrants from a transatlantic comparative perspective, this book provides a unique analytical approach to an increasingly important global issue.

Migrants at Work

Immigration and Vulnerability in Labour Law

Author: Cathryn Costello,Mark Freedland

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191023523

Category: Law

Page: 414

View: 9855

There is a highly significant and under-considered intersection and interaction between migration law and labour law. Labour lawyers have tended to regard migration law as generally speaking outside their purview, and migration lawyers have somewhat similarly tended to neglect labour law. The culmination of a collaborative project on 'Migrants at Work' funded by the John Fell Fund, the Society of Legal Scholars, and the Research Centre at St John's College, Oxford, this volume brings together distinguished legal and migration scholars to examine the impact of migration law on labour rights and how the regulation of migration increasingly impacts upon employment and labour relations. Examining and clarifying the interactions between migration, migration law, and labour law, contributors to the volume identify the many ways that migration law, as currently designed, divides the objectives of labour law, privileging concerns about the labour supply and demand over worker-protective concerns. In addition, migration law creates particular forms of status, which affect employment relations, thereby dividing the subjects of labour law. Chapters cover the labour laws of the UK, Australia, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Germany, Sweden, and the US. References are also made to discrete practices in Brazil, France, Greece, New Zealand, Mexico, Poland, and South Africa. These countries all host migrants and have developed systems of migration law reflecting very different trajectories. Some are traditional countries of immigration and settlement migration, while others have traditionally been countries of emigration but now import many workers. There are, nonetheless, common features in their immigration law which have a profound impact on labour law, for instance in their shared contemporary shift to using temporary labour migration programmes. Further chapters examine EU and international law on migration, labour rights, human rights, and human trafficking and smuggling, developing cross-jurisdictional and multi-level perspectives. Written by leading scholars of labour law, migration law, and migration studies, this book provides a diverse and multidisciplinary approach to this field of legal interaction, of interest to academics, policymakers, legal practitioners, trade unions, and migrants' groups alike.

The Oxford Handbook of Employment Relations

Author: Adrian Wilkinson,Geoffrey Wood,Richard Deeg

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191651494

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 760

View: 5815

There have been numerous accounts exploring the relationship between institutions and firm practices. However, much of this literature tends to be located into distinct theoretical-traditional 'silos', such as national business systems, social systems of production, regulation theory, or varieties of capitalism, with limited dialogue between different approaches to enhance understanding of institutional effects. Again, evaluations of the relationship between institutions and employment relations have tended to be of the broad-brushstroke nature, often founded on macro-data, and with only limited attention being accorded to internal diversity and details of actual practice. The Handbook aims to fill this gap by bringing together an assembly of comprehensive and high quality chapters to enable understanding of changes in employment relations since the early 1970s. Theoretically-based chapters attempt to link varieties of capitalism, business systems, and different modes of regulation to the specific practice of employment relations, and offer a truly comparative treatment of the subject, providing frameworks and empirical evidence for understanding trends in employment relations in different parts of the world. Most notably, the Handbook seeks to incorporate at a theoretical level regulationist accounts and recent work that link bounded internal systemic diversity with change, and, at an applied level, a greater emphasis on recent applied evidence, specifically dealing with the employment contract, its implementation, and related questions of work organization. It will be useful to academics and students of industrial relations, political economy, and management.

Migration and Social Cohesion in the UK

Author: M. Hickman,N. Mai,H. Crowley

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137015179

Category: Social Science

Page: 232

View: 4221

Based on a flagship research project for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation's Immigration and Inclusion programme, this book argues that social cohesion is achieved through people (new arrivals as well as the long-term settled) being able to resolve the conflicts and tensions within their day-to-day lives in ways that they find positive and viable.

Between Two Worlds

Mexican Immigrants in the United States

Author: David Gregory Gutiérrez

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780842024747

Category: Social Science

Page: 271

View: 1250

This work explores the controversial issues surrounding the influx of Mexicans to America. Drawing on insights provoked by recent trends in immigration research, these 11 essays offer an overview of some of the more important interpretations of the dimensions of the Mexican diaspora.

Not Working

Latina Immigrants, Low-wage Jobs, and the Failure of Welfare Reform

Author: Alejandra Marchevsky,Jeanne Theoharis

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814757109

Category: Social Science

Page: 308

View: 7296

Originalism is the practice of reviewing constitutional cases by seeking to discern the framers' and ratifiers' intent. Original Sin argues that the "jurisprudence of original intent," represented on the current Supreme Court by Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas, has failed on its own terms. Attempts to determine the framers' intent have not brought greater determinacy and legitimacy to the process of constitutional interpretation. Instead, the method has been marked by the very flaws—including self-interested reasoning and the manipulation of doctrine—that originalists argue marred the jurisprudence of the judicial "activists" of the Warren Court. Original Sin brings a rigorous review of the performance of the "new originalists" to the debate, applying their methodology to real cases. Marcosson focuses on the judicial decisions of Clarence Thomas, an avowed originalist who nevertheless advocates "color blind" readings of the Constitution which are at odds with the framers' ideas concerning anti-miscegenation and other laws. After critiquing what he sees as a troubling use of originalism and explaining why it has failed to provide a consistent basis for constitutional decision-making, the author goes on to offer an alternative approach: one that lends greater legitimacy to the Court's interpretations of the Constitution.

The Handbook of Social Work and Social Development in Africa

Author: Mel Gray

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317029372

Category: Social Science

Page: 414

View: 7266

All recent books on international social work mention Africa only briefly and few engage with the broader field of development studies. This book focuses solely on the unique African context engaging with issues relating to social work and development more broadly thus enabling a deeper examination and more complex and nuanced picture to emerge. Unlike most academic works, this book highlights multiple practitioner voices, with authors or co-authors that have recently been or are currently practising social workers. As an edited book, it draws from both academic research as well as lived practice experience, supported by strong theoretical positioning and guidance in introductory chapters, drawing on African literature, wherever possible. Looking at case-studies from Lesotho, Botswana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Namibia, Uganda, Nigeria, Kenya, South Africa, Rwanda, Zambia and Tanzania and covering established areas of practice such as child protection; working with older people; working with people with disabilities; mental health; and mainstream services targeting women as well as emerging areas of developmental social work practice, such as humanitarian assistance in post-conflict situations; work with immigrants and refugees; and the training of community-based workers, this book takes a future-oriented perspective that aims to move beyond well-worn critiques to envision constructive and sustainable futures for social work and social development in Africa from a critical perspective.

Transnational Migration and Lifelong Learning

Global Issues and Perspectives

Author: Shibao Guo

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113576011X

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 7699

Economic globalization, modern transportation, and advanced communication technologies have greatly enhanced the mobility of people across national boundaries. The resulting demographic, social, and cultural changes create new opportunities for development as well as new challenges for lifelong learning. Transnational Migration and Lifelong Learning examines the changing nature of lifelong learning in the current age of transnational migration. The book brings together international scholars from a range of countries in a dialogue about the relationship between work, learning, mobility, knowledge, and citizenship in the context of globalization and migration. It covers a wide range of topics, including: global perspectives and analyses of migration; the impact of migration on lifelong learning; processes of exclusion and inclusion in lifelong learning; the tension between mobility, knowledge, and recognition; and transnationalism, learning communities, and citizenship. This book was originally published as a special issue of the International Journal of Lifelong Education.

Handbook of Social Work Practice with Vulnerable and Resilient Populations

Author: Alex Gitterman

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231537018

Category: Social Science

Page: 896

View: 6942

When community and family support systems are weak or unavailable, and when internal resources fail, populations that struggle with chronic, persistent, acute, and/or unexpected problems become vulnerable to physical, cognitive, emotional, and social deterioration. Yet despite numerous risk factors, a large number of vulnerable people do live happy and productive lives. This best-selling handbook examines not only risk and vulnerability factors in disadvantaged populations but also resilience and protective strategies for managing and overcoming adversity. This third edition reflects new demographic data, research findings, and theoretical developments and accounts for changing economic and political realities, including immigration and health care policy reforms. Contributors have expanded their essays to include practice with individuals, families, and groups, and new chapters consider working with military members and their families, victims and survivors of terrorism and torture, bullied children, and young men of color.

Gender, Work and Space

Author: Susan Hanson,Geraldine Pratt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134857608

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 1984

Gender, Work and Space explores how social boundaries are constructed between women and men, and among women living in different places. Focusing on work, the segregation of men and women into different occupations, and variations in women's work experiences in different parts of the city, the authors argue that these differences are grounded, constituted in and through, space, place, and situated social networks. The sheer range and depth of this extraordinary study throws new light on the construction of social, geographic, economic, and symbolic boundaries in ordinary lives.

Gender and U.S. Immigration

Contemporary Trends

Author: Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520237391

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 797

"An important collection of essays that goes beyond the 'immigrant women only' approach to present new perspectives and raise new questions about gender and contemporary U.S. immigration."—Nancy Foner, author of From Ellis Island to JFK: New York's Two Great Waves of Immigration "At last a book that puts gender front and center in debates about the U.S. immigration experience and provides those new to these discussions with an invaluable introduction to the field. Particularly impressive is the substantive breadth of the contributions in this volume, which range from scholarship on the work, family, and political lives of immigrants from all parts of the globe to studies of ethnic, racial, and generational identity. A much needed and essential addition to the bookshelf of any immigration scholar. "—Peggy Levitt, author of The Transnational Villagers "This collection of wonderfully innovative and insightful essays by a distinguished group of social scientists demonstrates the definitive and mutually constitutive connections linking immigration and gender in the contemporary United States. The processes and practices of immigration play a central role in shaping a distinctly gendered distribution of opportunity and suffering, while gendered social structures, preferences, practices, and personal networks play a definitive role in shaping the contours of the immigrant experience and its impact on social, cultural, and economic life."—George Lipsitz, author of American Studies in a Moment of Danger "Hondagneu-Sotelo has assembled some of the foremost scholars in international migration to address the critical yet long-neglected issue of gender. The essays cover topics from employment to motherhood, relate home and host in transnational experiences, and incorporate differences in race, ethnicity, generation, and age in their analyses. A truly remarkable volume."—Lucie Cheng, co-author of Linking Our Lives: Chinese American Women of Los Angeles "Edited by a leading pioneer of immigration studies, this volume offers some of the latest and most brilliant thinking about what migrant men and women bring to the United States, leave behind and create anew. This is a must read for those interested in immigration, gender, and the many meanings of life."—Arlie Russell Hochschild, co-editor with Barbara Ehrenreich of Global Woman: Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy