Immediate Fiction

A Complete Writing Course

Author: Jerry Cleaver

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 304

View: 154

Covering the entire process from story building to manuscript preparation and marketing, Jerry Cleaver shows the novice and experienced writer how to start writing and how to get immediate results. Readers will find everything they need to know about managing time, finding an idea, getting the first word down on the page, staying unblocked, shaping ideas into compelling stories, and submitting their work to agents and publishers. Immediate Fiction goes beyond the old "Write what you know" to "Write what you can imagine." Filled with insightful tips on how to manage doubts, fears, blocks, and panic, Immediate Fiction will help writers develop their skills in as little minutes a day, if necessary. Believing that all writing is rewriting, Cleaver says, "You can't control what you put on the page. You can only control what you leave on the page." With this book Cleaver shows how to get that control and produce results.

Fiction-Writing Modes

Eleven Essential Tools for Bringing Your Story to Life

Author: Mike Klaassen

Publisher: BookBaby

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 200

View: 920

Are you thinking about writing fiction? Writing a novel? Trying to improve a manuscript? Then you need to know all about fiction-writing modes. Eleven fiction-writing modes comprise all written fiction. If you don't know what they are and how each works, how can your story reach its potential? Writing fiction isn't easy, but trying to write a novel without a solid understanding of fiction-writing modes is an exercise in frustration. You can learn about fiction-writing modes in three ways: (1) just start writing and hope you learn over time, (2) read lots of books and attend a bunch of seminars, or (3) study a book devoted entirely to the subject. Mike Klaassen has already read the books and attended the seminars. Combining his copious notes with his own writing experience, he's identified and defined eleven fiction-writing modes that comprise all written fiction. Save yourself a ton of time, money, and frustration with one comprehensive, concise book. Inside "Fiction-Writing Modes," you'll discover: all eleven modes, a definition of each mode, the nuances of using each mode, practical examples of how to use each mode, which modes are the most effective in fiction-writing today, how combining modes can magnify your writing power, and much, much more. Why spend countless hours doing your own research? "Fiction-Writing Modes: Eleven Essential Tools for Bringing Your Story to Life" is a treasure of straightforward, practical information that you can use immediately. Unlock your full potential with "Fiction-Writing Modes" today!

How to Write Fiction (And Think About It)

Author: Robert Graham

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 321

If you are a writer of fiction, this practical handbook will teach you how to acquire your own writer's tool-box. Here you will learn all about developing your craft. The wide-ranging exploration of fiction-writing skills contains many unique features, such as the focus on reflective learning and tuition on advanced skills including foreshadowing, transitions and producing short story cycles. Throughout, the approach is centred on three kinds of activity: - examining the theory of particular fiction writing skills - analysing the practice of these skills in examples of published work - practising the use of skills in fiction-writing exercises. What makes this guide so distinctive, though, is the way it consistently asks you to reflect on your work, and stresses the importance of being able to articulate the processes of writing. Packed with wisdom about the art of fiction and filled with writing exercises, How To Write Fiction (And Think About It) examines the work of today's finest authors to teach you everything you need to know about writing short stories or longer fiction. Whether you are a student, a would-be professional author, or a general reader who simply likes to write for pleasure, this guide will equip you with a portfolio of key fiction-writing skills.

A Companion to Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance

Author: Sukanta Chaudhuri

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 335

View: 192

This volume is an essential supplement to Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance: An anthology (2016). The full-length Introduction examines English Renaissance pastoral against the history of the mode from antiquity to the present, with its multifarious themes and social affinities. The study covers many genres - eclogue, lyric, georgic, country-house poem, ballad, romantic epic, prose romance - and major practitioners - Theocritus, Virgil, Sidney, Spenser, Drayton and Milton. It also charts the circulation of pastoral texts, with implications for all early modern poetry. All poems in the Anthology were edited from the original texts; the Companion documents the sources and variant readings in unprecedented detail for a cross-section of early modern poetry. Includes notes on the poets and analytical indices. The Companion is indispensable not only to users of the Anthology but to all students and advanced scholars of Renaissance poetry.

Educators as Writers

Publishing for Personal and Professional Development

Author: Carol Smallwood

Publisher: Peter Lang

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 268

View: 506

Textbook

New Vocabularies in Film Semiotics

Structuralism, Post-structuralism, and Beyond

Author: Robert Stam

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 239

View: 549

First published in 1992. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Great Chiasmus

Word and Flesh in the Novels of Unamuno

Author: Paul Richard Olson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 264

View: 326

"...Unamuno often entertains a view of the universe as an enormous system of embedded and embedding forms, structures nested within other structures in seemingly endless series." -From The Great Chiasmus In The Great Chiasmus, Paul R. Olson explores the use of the chiasmus in the work of Miguel de Unamuno. The chiasmus, a reversal in the order of words or parts of speech in parallel phrases, appears on a variety of levels, from brief microstructures ("blanca como la nieve y como la nieve fria"), to the narrative structures of entire novels, and even, Olson suggests, to encompass the stages in Unamuno's novelistic work. Olson's close readings of the texts in terms of this structure lead to observations on Spanish history, events in Unamuno's life, the psychological dimensions of his characters, and the authorial self found within his texts. The Great Chiasmus shows us how Unamuno uses grammar to reflect apparent contraries as freely reversible and thus identical. In this connection, Unamuno explores concepts usually considered opposites-spirit and matter, word and flesh.

A Novel Marketplace

Mass Culture, the Book Trade, and Postwar American Fiction

Author: Evan Brier

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 293

As television transformed American culture in the 1950s, critics feared the influence of this newly pervasive mass medium on the nation's literature. While many studies have addressed the rhetorical response of artists and intellectuals to mid-twentieth-century mass culture, the relationship between the emergence of this culture and the production of novels has gone largely unexamined. In A Novel Marketplace, Evan Brier illuminates the complex ties between postwar mass culture and the making, marketing, and reception of American fiction. Between 1948, when television began its ascendancy, and 1959, when Random House became a publicly owned corporation, the way American novels were produced and distributed changed considerably. Analyzing a range of mid-century novels—including Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, Sloan Wilson's The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, and Grace Metalious's Peyton Place—Brier reveals the specific strategies used to carve out cultural and economic space for the American novel just as it seemed most under threat. During this anxious historical moment, the book business underwent an improbable expansion, by capitalizing on an economic boom and a rising population of educated consumers and by forming institutional alliances with educators and cold warriors to promote reading as both a cultural and political good. A Novel Marketplace tells how the book trade and the novelists themselves successfully positioned their works as embattled holdouts against an oppressive mass culture, even as publishers formed partnerships with mass-culture institutions that foreshadowed the multimedia mergers to come in the 1960s. As a foil for and a partner to literary institutions, mass media corporations assisted in fostering the novel's development as both culture and commodity.

The Cambridge Companion to the Modernist Novel

Author: Morag Shiach

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 249

View: 743

The novel is modernism's most vital and experimental genre. With a chronology and guide to further reading, this 2007 Companion is an accessible and informative overview of the genre.