Early Hunter-Gatherers of the California Coast

Author: Jon M. Erlandson

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 717

Based on detailed excavation data, the author reconstructs the paleography of the Santa Barbara coast ca. 8500 years ago, makes comparisons to other early California sites, and applies his findings to current theories of hunter-gatherers and coastal environments. With an emphasis on paleographic reconstructions, site formation processes, chronological studies, and integrated faunal analyses, the work will be of interest to a wide range of scholars working in shell middens, hunter-gatherer ecology, geoarchaeology, and coatal or aquatic adaptations.

California Maritime Archaeology

A San Clemente Island Perspective

Author: Raab

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 236

View: 756

San Clemente Island is a microcosm of California coastal archaeology from prehistoric through historic times—not only because of the extensiveness of its archaeological remains but because those remains have been so well preserved. In California Maritime Archaeology, the authors use the island as a platform to explore evidence of early seafaring, colonization, paleoenvironmental change, and cultural interaction along the California coast. They make a strong case that San Clemente island should be seen as a kind of "California archaeological Galapagos," offering an extraordinary variety of ancient life as well as surprising information about prehistoric hunter-gatherers of the northern Pacific. The authors' two decades of research have resulted in this rich cultural history that defies widespread assumptions about California's ancient maritime history.

Humans at the End of the Ice Age

The Archaeology of the Pleistocene—Holocene Transition

Author: Lawrence Guy Straus

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 756

Humans at the End of the Ice Age chronicles and explores the significance of the variety of cultural responses to the global environmental changes at the last glacial-interglacial boundary. Contributions address the nature and consequences of the global climate changes accompanying the end of the Pleistocene epoch-detailing the nature, speed, and magnitude of the human adaptations that culminated in the development of food production in many parts of the world. The text is aided by vital maps, chronological tables, and charts.

From the Pleistocene to the Holocene

Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America

Author: C. Britt Bousman

Publisher: Texas A&M University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 346

View: 988

The end of the Pleistocene era brought dramatic environmental changes to small bands of humans living in North America: changes that affected subsistence, mobility, demography, technology, and social relations. The transition they made from Paleoindian (Pleistocene) to Archaic (Early Holocene) societies represents the first major cultural shift that took place solely in the Americas. This event—which manifested in ways and at times much more varied than often supposed—set the stage for the unique developments of behavioral complexity that distinguish later Native American prehistoric societies. Using localized studies and broad regional syntheses, the contributors to this volume demonstrate the diversity of adaptations to the dynamic and changing environmental and cultural landscapes that occurred between the Pleistocene and early portion of the Holocene. The authors' research areas range from Northern Mexico to Alaska and across the continent to the American Northeast, synthesizing the copious available evidence from well-known and recent excavations.With its methodologically and geographically diverse approach, From the Pleistocene to the Holocene: Human Organization and Cultural Transformations in Prehistoric North America provides an overview of the present state of knowledge regarding this crucial transformative period in Native North America. It offers a large-scale synthesis of human adaptation, reflects the range of ideas and concepts in current archaeological theoretical approaches, and acts as a springboard for future explanations and models of prehistoric change.

Encyclopedia of Prehistory

Volume 6: North America

Author: Peter N. Peregrine

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 509

View: 463

The Encyclopedia of Prehistory represents temporal dimension. Major traditions are an attempt to provide basic information also defined by a somewhat different set of on all archaeologically known cultures, sociocultural characteristics than are eth covering the entire globe and the entire nological cultures. Major traditions are prehistory of humankind. It is designed as defined based on common subsistence a tool to assist in doing comparative practices, sociopolitical organization, and research on the peoples of the past. Most material industries, but language, ideology, of the entries are written by the world's and kinship ties play little or no part in foremost experts on the particular areas their definition because they are virtually and time periods. unrecoverable from archaeological con The Encyclopedia is organized accord texts. In contrast, language, ideology, and ing to major traditions. A major tradition kinship ties are central to defining ethno is defined as a group of populations sharing logical cultures.

Human responses to insularity

the intensification of a marine-oriented economy on San Clemente Island, California

Author: Thomas Sherman Garlinghouse

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 512

View: 671

Prehistoric California

archaeology and the myth of paradise

Author: L. Mark Raab

Publisher: Univ of Utah Pr

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 266

View: 274

IN THIS ANTHOLOGY, Mark Raab and Terry Jones present a series of research articles that dispel lingering mythologies about California's prehistory. They begin with the most enduring notion--that of an essentially stable, benign climate--presenting evidence that prehistoric climate flux played a significant role in culture change. From there, Raab and Jones assault the myth of California as a natural cornucopia. They show that prehistoric foragers themselves had the capacity to negatively affect their animal food supplies, and that what is often considered the premier vegetal food, the acorn, appeared much later than many suppose in the diets of native peoples. This collection effectively summarizes the major debates surrounding California archaeology and provides a solid basis for a new, more nuanced view of the state's prehistory.