Hugo Grotius on the Law of War and Peace

Student Edition

Author: Stephen C. Neff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139560182

Category: Law

Page: N.A

View: 6020

Despite its significant influence on international law, international relations, natural law and political thought in general, Grotius's Law of War and Peace has been virtually unavailable for many decades. Stephen Neff's edited and annotated version of the text rectifies this situation. Containing the substantive portion of the classic text, but shorn of extraneous material, this edited and annotated edition of one of the classic works of Western legal and political thought is intended for students and teachers in four primary areas: history of international law, history of political thought, history of international relations and history of philosophy.

The Rights of War and Peace, Including the Law of Nature and of Nations

Author: Hugo Grotius

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1602068070

Category: Law

Page: 436

View: 968

The Rights of War and Peace establishes a system of international law based on the concept of natural law. Natural law, as Grotius describes it, is law that applies to all people, regardless of country or nationality. This law establishes concepts like "justifiable war" and "natural justice." Grotius discusses situations under which countries should go to war, and then further explains the proper way in which wars should be prosecuted. There are, he says, certain rules in warfare that must be observed, regardless of whether the parties involved have signed any specific agreement to do so. Philosophy and law students, as well as those with an interest in international politics, will be amazed at how modern many of Grotius's ideas seem and intrigued by this foray into international law that still has repercussions in the world today. HUGO GROTIUS (1583-1645) was born in the city of Delft in the Dutch Republic. Astoundingly intelligent, he entered the University of Leiden at age eleven and graduated at age fifteen. He was a philosopher and Christian apologist now remembered for his work in establishing a philosophical basis for international law.

War and the Law of Nations

A General History

Author: Stephen C. Neff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521662055

Category: History

Page: 443

View: 1822

This 2005 volume is a history of war, from an international law perspective, from Roman times to the present.

The Rights of War and Peace

Author: Hugo Grotius

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781434413000

Category: Law

Page: 438

View: 4363

Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), a.k.a., Hugo de Groot, laid the foundations for international law based on natural law with Francisco de Vitoria and Alberico Gentili. The 1625 De Jure Belli ac Pacis, also translated as On the Law of War and Peace, is considered to be a foundational work in international law.

Grotius on the Rights of War and Peace

An Abridged Translation

Author: Hugo Grotius,William Whewell

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 158477942X

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 1353

Reprint of the sole edition of this translation. In this momentous work Grotius describes the situations in which war is a valid tool of law enforcement and outlines the principles of armed combat. Though based on Christian natural law, Grotius advanced the novel argument that his system would still be valid if it lacked a divine basis. In this regard he pointed to the future by moving international law in a secular direction. This edition was abridged by removing most of the quotations from "ancient historians, orators, philosophers, and poets," which are identified in footnotes. As Whewell states in the preface, they tended to "confuse the subject, obscure the reasoning, and weary the reader." By removing them he enhanced clarity and reduced the bulk of the work by "more than a half" (vi). Hugo Grotius [1583-1645], generally acknowledged as the founder of international law, was an influential Dutch jurist, philosopher and theologian. Originally published in 1625, De Jure Belli ac Pacis (On the Law of War and Peace, translated by Whewell as On the Rights of War and Peace) is widely considered to be the first modern treatise on international law. William Whewell [1794-1866] wrote on numerous subjects and is known for the breadth of his endeavors, and his influence on the philosophy of science. He was one of the founding members and an early president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the Royal Society, president of the Geological Society, and longtime Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.

Political Thinkers

From Socrates to the Present

Author: David Boucher,Paul Kelly

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198708920

Category:

Page: 712

View: 5135

Political Thinkers is the most comprehensive introduction to Western political thought written by a team of internationally renowned scholars. The third edition provides students with a clear and engaging introduction to the canon of great theorists, from Socrates and the Sophists to contemporary thinkers such as Rawls and Arendt. Each chapter begins with a helpful chapter guide, a biographical sketch of the thinker, a list of their key texts, and their key ideas. Part introductions and a concluding chapter enable readers to understand the social and political contexts that inspired political thinkers to write. The third edition features two brand new chapters on Hannah Arendt, one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, and Hugo Grotius, whose work on just war continues to inform international law today.

The Internationalists

How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World

Author: Oona A. Hathaway,Scott J. Shapiro

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 150110988X

Category: History

Page: 608

View: 6821

“An original book…about individuals who used ideas to change the world” (The New Yorker)—the fascinating exploration into the creation and history of the Paris Peace Pact, an often overlooked but transformative treaty that laid the foundation for the international system we live under today. In 1928, the leaders of the world assembled in Paris to outlaw war. Within the year, the treaty signed that day, known as the Peace Pact, had been ratified by nearly every state in the world. War, for the first time in history, had become illegal. But within a decade of its signing, each state that had gathered in Paris to renounce war was at war. And in the century that followed, the Peace Pact was dismissed as an act of folly and an unmistakable failure. This book argues that the Peace Pact ushered in a sustained march toward peace that lasts to this day. A “thought-provoking and comprehensively researched book” (The Wall Street Journal), The Internationalists tells the story of the Peace Pact through a fascinating and diverse array of lawyers, politicians, and intellectuals. It reveals the centuries-long struggle of ideas over the role of war in a just world order. It details the brutal world of conflict the Peace Pact helped extinguish, and the subsequent era where tariffs and sanctions take the place of tanks and gunships. The Internationalists is “indispensable” (The Washington Post). Accessible and gripping, this book will change the way we view the history of the twentieth century—and how we must work together to protect the global order the internationalists fought to make possible. “A fascinating and challenging book, which raises gravely important issues for the present…Given the state of the world, The Internationalists has come along at the right moment” (The Financial Times).

Vitoria: Political Writings

Author: Francisco de Vitoria,Anthony Pagden,Jeremy Lawrance

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521367141

Category: History

Page: 399

View: 1790

Francisco Vitoria was the earliest and arguably the most important of the Thomist political philosophers of the Counter-Reformation. Not only did he write important essays on civil and ecclesiastical power, but he became celebrated for his defence of the new world Indians against the imperialism of his own master, the King of Spain. Vitoria's political works are thus of great importance for an understanding both of the rise of modern absolutism, and the debate about the emergent imperialism of the European powers. His works are also unusually accessible, since they survive mainly in the form of 'relectiones', or summaries delivered at the end of his lecture courses on law and theology at the University of Salamanca. Translated here into English for the first time, these texts comprise the core of Vitoria's thought, and will be of interest to specialists in political theory and the history of ideas, ecclesiastical history, and the history of early modern Spain. A comprehensive introduction, a chronology, and a bibliography accompany the texts.

The Law of Nations

Or, Principles of the Law of Nature Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns. A Work Tending to Display the True Interest of Powers

Author: Emer de Vattel

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: International law

Page: 563

View: 3444

Hugo Grotius and the Century of Revolution, 1613-1718

Transnational Reception in English Political Thought

Author: Marco Barducci

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198754582

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2883

Hugo Grotius and the Century of Revolution, 1613-1718 is a reconstruction of the way Hugo Grotius (1583-1645) was read and used by English political and religious writers in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. Engaging with the reception of all of Grotius's key works and a wide range of topics, the volume has much to say about the search for peace in an age of religious conflict and about the cultural roots of the Enlightenment. Most of all, Marco Barducci aims to deepen our understanding of the connections that made English political thought part of the history of European thought. To this end, it brings together a succinct account of Grotius's own thinking on key topics, mapping these accounts within English debates, to show why his ideas were seen to be relevant at key moments; shows awareness of the possibilities for the misappropriation inherent in reception; and adds something new to our understanding of why seventeenth-century Englishmen argued in the ways that they did.

Hugo Grotius

A Lifelong Struggle for Peace in Church and State, 1583 – 1645

Author: Henk J.M. Nellen

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004281797

Category: History

Page: 946

View: 2937

This biography offers a detailed portrait of the famous humanist scholar Hugo Grotius (1583-1645), jurist, politician, Neo-Latin poet and Christian apologist, on the basis of his voluminous correspondence.

Natural Rights Theories

Their Origin and Development

Author: Richard Tuck

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521285094

Category: History

Page: 185

View: 6620

The origins of natural rights theories in medieval Europe and their development in the seventeenth century.

The Rights of War and Peace

Political Thought and the International Order from Grotius to Kant

Author: Richard Tuck

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191037427

Category: Law

Page: 256

View: 1950

The Rights of War and Peace is the first fully historical account of the formative period of modern theories of international law. It sets the scene with an extensive history of the theory of international relations from antiquity down to the seventeenth century. Professor Tuck then examines the arguments over the moral basis for war and international aggression, and links the debates to the writings of the great political theorists such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant. This is not only an account of international law: as Professor Tuck shows, ideas about inter-state relations were central to the formation of modern liberal political theory, for the best example the kind of agent which liberalism presupposes was provided by the modern state. As a result the book illuminates the presuppositions behind much current political theory, and puts into a new perspective the connection between liberalism and imperialism.

The free sea

Author: Hugo Grotius,Richard Hakluyt,William Welwood,David Armitage

Publisher: Liberty Fund Inc.

ISBN: N.A

Category: Law

Page: 145

View: 6209

The freedom of the oceans of the world and coastal waters has been a contentious issue in international law for the past four hundred years. The most influential argument in favor of freedom of navigation, trade, and fishing was that put forth by the Dutch theorist Hugo Grotius in his 1609 Mare Liberum (The Free Sea). The Free Sea was originally published in order to buttress Dutch claims of access to the lucrative markets of the East Indies. It had been composed as the twelfth chapter of a larger work, De Jure Praedae (Commentary on the Law of Prize and Booty), which Grotius had written to defend the Dutch East India Company’s capture in 1603 of a rich Portuguese merchant ship in the Strait of Singapore. Liberty Fund’s new edition of The Free Sea is the only translation of Grotius’s masterpiece undertaken in his own lifetime, left in manuscript by the English historian, Richard Hakluyt (1552–1616). It also contains William Welwod’s critique of Grotius (reprinted for the first time since the seventeenth century) and Grotius’s reply to Welwod. These documents provide an indispensable introduction to modern ideas of sovereignty and property as they emerged from the early-modern tradition of natural law. Hugo Grotius is one of the most important thinkers in the early-modern period. A great humanistic polymath—lawyer and legal theorist, diplomat and political philosopher, ecumenical activist and theologian—his work was seminal for modern natural law and influenced the moral, political, legal, and theological thought of the Enlightenment, from Hobbes, Pufendorf, and Locke to Rousseau and Kant, as well as America’s Founding leaders. David Armitage is the Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History at Harvard University. He is the author of The Ideological Origins of the British Empire and The Declaration of Independence: A Global History; the editor of Theories of Empire, 1450–1800; and the co-editor of The British Atlantic World, 1500–1800, Shakespeare and Early Modern Political Thought, and The Age of Revolutions in Global Context, c. 1760–1840. Richard Hakluyt (d. 1616) was a geographer, editor, and translator of travel literature. Knud Haakonssen is Professor of Intellectual History and Director of the Centre for Intellectual History at the University of Sussex, England.

Hugo Grotius and the Modern Theology of Freedom

Transcending Natural Rights

Author: Jeremy Seth Geddert

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1315525798

Category: Political Science

Page: 250

View: 3943

Human rights are thought to guarantee pluralism by protecting individual liberty from imposed religious conceptions of virtue. Yet critics often argue that this secular focus on merely avoiding violations can also enable unfettered individualism and undermine appeals to the common good. This book uncovers in secular rights pioneer Hugo Grotius a rights theory that points toward the enlargement of individual responsibility. It grounds this connection in Grotius’ unexplored theological corpus, which reveals a dual metaethics and jurisprudence. Here a deontological natural law undergirds a secular theory of rights that is self-aware of its own limitations. A teleological practical reason then guides the exercise of these rights, so as not to compromise the political order that defends them. The book then illustrates this symbiosis of rights and responsibilities in five areas: consent theories of government, rights of rebellion, criminal punishment, war and international responsibility, and Atonement theology. This reassesses Grotius’ legacy as a secularist opponent of classical political thought, and suggests that modern liberalism and universal human rights are compatible with a world of resurgent religion.

Mare Liberum

Author: Hugo Grotius,Alex Struik

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN: 9781479277568

Category: Law

Page: 82

View: 4745

"Mare Liberum" is a book (originally written in Latin) on international law written by the Dutch jurist and philosopher Hugo Grotius. In Mare Liberum, Grotius formulated the new principle that the sea was international territory and all nations were free to use it for seafaring trade. The disputation was directed towards the Portuguese Mare Clausum policy and their claim of monopoly on the East Indian Trade. Grotius wrote the treatise while counsel to the Dutch East India Company over the seizure of the Portuguese carrack "Santa Catarina".Hugo Grotius (10 April 1583 – 28 August 1645), was a jurist in the Dutch Republic. With Francisco de Vitoria and Alberico Gentili he laid the foundations for international law, based on natural law. He was also a philosopher, theologian, Christian apologist, playwright, and poet.

Just War Thinkers

From Cicero to the 21st Century

Author: Daniel R. Brunstetter,Cian O’Driscoll

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317307119

Category: Political Science

Page: 282

View: 3542

This volume offers a set of concise and accessible introductions to the seminal figures in the historical development of the just war tradition. In what, if any, circumstances are political communities justified in going to war? And what limits should apply to the conduct of any such war? The just war tradition is a body of thought that helps us think through these very questions. Its core ideas have been subject to fierce debate for over 2,000 years. Yet they continue to play a prominent role in how political and military leaders address the challenges posed by the use of force in international society. Until now there has been no text that offers concise and accessible introductions to the key figures associated with the tradition. Stepping into this breach, Just War Thinkers provides a set of clear but detailed essays by leading experts on nineteen seminal thinkers, from Cicero to Jeff McMahan. This volume challenges the reader to think about how traditions are constituted—who is included and excluded, and how that is determined—and how they serve to enable, constrain, and indeed channel subsequent thought, debate, and exchange. This book will be of much interest to students of just war tradition and theory, ethics and war, philosophy, security studies and IR.

Justice among Nations

Author: Stephen C. Neff

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674726545

Category: Law

Page: 640

View: 1309

Justice among Nations tells the story of the rise of international law and how it has been formulated, debated, contested, and put into practice from ancient times to the present. Stephen Neff avoids technical jargon as he surveys doctrines from natural law to feminism, and practice from the Warring States of China to the international criminal courts of today. Ancient China produced the first rudimentary set of doctrines. But the cornerstone of international law was laid by the Romans, in the form of universal natural law. However, as medieval European states encountered non-Christian peoples from East Asia to the New World, new legal quandaries arose, and by the seventeenth century the first modern theories of international law were devised.New challenges in the nineteenth century encompassed nationalism, free trade, imperialism, international organizations, and arbitration. Innovative doctrines included liberalism, the nationality school, and solidarism. The twentieth century witnessed the League of Nations and a World Court, but also the rise of socialist and fascist states and the advent of the Cold War. Yet the collapse of the Soviet Union brought little respite. As Neff makes clear, further threats to the rule of law today come from environmental pressures, genocide, and terrorism.

Laughing at the Gods

Great Judges and How They Made the Common Law

Author: Allan C. Hutchinson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107017262

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 318

View: 4849

This book showcases eight judges that exemplify judicial greatness and looks at what role they play in law and society.