How Doctors Think

Author: Jerome Groopman

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547348636

Category: Medical

Page: 320

View: 9063

On average, a physician will interrupt a patient describing her symptoms within eighteen seconds. In that short time, many doctors decide on the likely diagnosis and best treatment. Often, decisions made this way are correct, but at crucial moments they can also be wrong -- with catastrophic consequences. In this myth-shattering book, Jerome Groopman pinpoints the forces and thought processes behind the decisions doctors make. Groopman explores why doctors err and shows when and how they can -- with our help -- avoid snap judgments, embrace uncertainty, communicate effectively, and deploy other skills that can profoundly impact our health. This book is the first to describe in detail the warning signs of erroneous medical thinking and reveal how new technologies may actually hinder accurate diagnoses. How Doctors Think offers direct, intelligent questions patients can ask their doctors to help them get back on track. Groopman draws on a wealth of research, extensive interviews with some of the country’s best doctors, and his own experiences as a doctor and as a patient. He has learned many of the lessons in this book the hard way, from his own mistakes and from errors his doctors made in treating his own debilitating medical problems. How Doctors Think reveals a profound new view of twenty-first-century medical practice, giving doctors and patients the vital information they need to make better judgments together.

How Doctors Think

Author: Jerome Groopman

Publisher: Scribe Publications

ISBN: 1921640219

Category: Medical logic

Page: 317

View: 8017

On average, a physician will interrupt a patient describing her symptoms within eighteen seconds. In that short time, many doctors decide on the likely diagnosis and best treatment. Often, decisions made this way are correct, but at crucial moments they can also be wrong with catastrophic consequences. In this myth-shattering book, Jerome Groopman pinpoints the forces and thought processes behind the decisions doctors make. Groopman explores why doctors err and shows when and how they can with our help avoid snap judgments, embrace uncertainty, communicate effectively, and deploy other skills that can profoundly impact our health. This book is the first to describe in detail the warning signs of erroneous medical thinking and reveal how new technologies may actually hinder accurate diagnoses. How Doctors Think offers direct, intelligent questions patients can ask their doctors to help them get back on track.Groopman draws on a wealth of research, extensive interviews with some of the country's best doctors, and his own experience as a doctor and as a patient. He has learned many of the lessons in this book the hard way, from his own mistakes and from errors his doctors made in treating his debilitating medical problems.How Doctors Think reveals a profound new view of twenty-first-century medical practice, giving doctors and patients the vital information they need to make better judgments together.

How Doctors Think

Author: Jerome E. Groopman

Publisher: Mariner Books

ISBN: 9780547053646

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 319

View: 3082

A physician discusses the thought patterns and actions that lead to misdiagnosis on the part of healthcare providers, and suggests methods that patients can use to help doctors assess conditions more accurately.

How Doctors Think

Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine

Author: Kathryn Montgomery

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195187121

Category: Medical

Page: 246

View: 4978

Defines the nature and importance of clinical judgement. Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science, but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning. It also contends that there can be adverse side effects to assuming that medicine is strictly science.

Your Medical Mind

How to Decide What Is Right for You

Author: Jerome Groopman,Pamela Hartzband

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN: 014312224X

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 308

View: 3581

Offers advice on making medical decisions in spite of confusing and conflicting information, and provides insight into the beliefs influencing how choices are made while citing the marketing practices that complicate the process.

What Doctors Feel

How Emotions Affect the Practice of Medicine

Author: Danielle Ofri

Publisher: Beacon Press

ISBN: 0807073334

Category: Medical

Page: 232

View: 6677

A look at the emotional side of medicine—the shame, fear, anger, anxiety, empathy, and even love that affect patient care Physicians are assumed to be objective, rational beings, easily able to detach as they guide patients and families through some of life’s most challenging moments. But doctors’ emotional responses to the life-and-death dramas of everyday practice have a profound impact on medical care. And while much has been written about the minds and methods of the medical professionals who save our lives, precious little has been said about their emotions. In What Doctors Feel, Dr. Danielle Ofri has taken on the task of dissecting the hidden emotional responses of doctors, and how these directly influence patients. How do the stresses of medical life—from paperwork to grueling hours to lawsuits to facing death—affect the medical care that doctors can offer their patients? Digging deep into the lives of doctors, Ofri examines the daunting range of emotions—shame, anger, empathy, frustration, hope, pride, occasionally despair, and sometimes even love—that permeate the contemporary doctor-patient connection. Drawing on scientific studies, including some surprising research, Dr. Danielle Ofri offers up an unflinching look at the impact of emotions on health care. With her renowned eye for dramatic detail, Dr. Ofri takes us into the swirling heart of patient care, telling stories of caregivers caught up and occasionally torn down by the whirlwind life of doctoring. She admits to the humiliation of an error that nearly killed one of her patients and her forever fear of making another. She mourns when a beloved patient is denied a heart transplant. She tells the riveting stories of an intern traumatized when she is forced to let a newborn die in her arms, and of a doctor whose daily glass of wine to handle the frustrations of the ER escalates into a destructive addiction. But doctors don’t only feel fear, grief, and frustration. Ofri also reveals that doctors tell bad jokes about “toxic sock syndrome,” cope through gallows humor, find hope in impossible situations, and surrender to ecstatic happiness when they triumph over illness. The stories here reveal the undeniable truth that emotions have a distinct effect on how doctors care for their patients. For both clinicians and patients, understanding what doctors feel can make all the difference in giving and getting the best medical care.

Medical Investigation 101

A Book to Inspire Your Interest in Medicine and How Doctors Think

Author: Russ Hill

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 9781548505998

Category:

Page: 258

View: 7634

Medical Investigation 101 invites students to try out a career in medical science. They learn about medical specialties and the wide array of healthcare team careers. They try their hand at solving the sort of medical mysteries doctors confront each day. Students learn some basic medical terminology and they discover how doctors analyze and solve medical puzzles. Students play the role of the physician as they read the realistic case histories and learn about the applicable physiology and pathophysiology. They complete interactive activities in each lesson to enhance information retrieval. These medical investigations stress a methodical way of thinking applicable to a wide array of decision making in life. Finally, the authors introduce current concepts in gene editing and medical therapy that promise the emergency of new frontiers in health science careers for today's students. Together, Drs. Hill and Griffith, share with their readers over fifty years of medical and teaching experience. Actual students have tested these lessons and endorsed the experience with remarkable enthusiasm. Students from middle grades, high school, and college should find the information useful as they learn about and assess their interest in healthcare related careers. The current trend in education has put a focus on career readiness, and yet we have not seen a textbook that introduces students to medically-oriented careers. This book tries to do just that by providing insights into how doctors analyze problems and conduct medical investigations. Whether students end up with a medically oriented career or not, the analytical skills required of physicians have applications in almost all careers we expect to see opening up in the future. Besides, It never hurts to have some basic medical knowledge tucked away when collaborating with a physician to maintain your own good health.

Kill as Few Patients as Possible

And Fifty-Six Other Essays on How to Be the World's Best Doctor

Author: Oscar London

Publisher: Random House Digital, Inc.

ISBN: 1580089178

Category: Humor

Page: 109

View: 2502

This oft-quoted all-time favorite of the medical community will gladden--and strengthen--the hearts of patients, doctors, and anyone entering medical study, internship, or practice. With unassailable logic and rapier wit, the sage Dr. Oscar London muses on the challenges and joys of doctoring, and imparts timeless truths, reality checks, and poignant insights gleaned from 30 years of general practice--while never taking himself (or his profession) too seriously. The classic book on the art and humor of practicing medicine, celebrating its 20th anniversary in a new gift edition with updates throughout. Previous editions have sold more than 200,000 copies. The perfect gift for med students and grads as well as new and practicing physicians. Approximately 17,000 students graduate from med school each spring in North America.

Attending

Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity

Author: Ronald Epstein

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501121731

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 3378

With his “deeply informed and compassionate book…Dr. Epstein tells us that it is a ‘moral imperative’ [for doctors] to do right by their patients” (New York Journal of Books). The first book for the general public about the importance of mindfulness in medical practice, Attending is a groundbreaking, intimate exploration of how doctors approach their work with patients. From his early days as a Harvard Medical School student, Epstein saw what made good doctors great—more accurate diagnoses, fewer errors, and stronger connections with their patients. This made a lasting impression on him and set the stage for his life’s work—identifying the qualities and habits that distinguish master clinicians from those who are merely competent. The secret, he learned, was mindfulness. Dr. Epstein “shows how taking time to pay attention to patients can lead to better outcomes on both sides of the stethoscope” (Publishers Weekly). Drawing on his clinical experiences and current research, Dr. Epstein explores four foundations of mindfulness—Attention, Curiosity, Beginner’s Mind, and Presence—and shows how clinicians can grow their capacity to provide high-quality care. The commodification of health care has shifted doctors’ focus away from the healing of patients to the bottom line. Clinician burnout is at an all-time high. Attending is the antidote. With compassion and intelligence, Epstein offers “a concise guide to his view of what mindfulness is, its value, and how it is a skill that anyone can work to acquire” (Library Journal).

Inside the Mind of A Physician

Illuminating the Mystery of How Doctors Think, What They Feel and Why They Do the Things They Do

Author: Herdley Paolini

Publisher: Florida Hospital Publishing

ISBN: 0982040903

Category: Health

Page: 60

View: 8986

Are physicians a mystery? To many of us, yes. Physicians perform one of the most valuable personal services in the world. They care for our bodies in the most intimate of ways. We place our lives in their hands and trust they have our best interest at heart. But how much do we really know of physicians and their inner world? Relatively little. The environment for practicing medicine has changed dramatically over the past few decades. The commoditizing of physicians and their work frequently causes a dehumanization of the doctor and the doctor/patient relationship not to mention the connections between physicians and other staff. Due to the training, practice culture, constraints, liabilities, and pressures placed on physicians today, they often cannot practice the kind of personalized, relationship-enhancing medicine that would benefit both patient and caregiver. In this monograph Dr. Herdley Paolini does a great service by opening the inner world of physicians and helping us understand them, how to relate to them, and how to best support them in their critical role in healthcare. Her insights will be of great value to everyone from hospital administrators and clinical staff, to insurance providers, government agencies, and anyone who interacts with physicians. The Florida Hospital Healthcare & Leadership Monograph Series is an innovative teaching and learning tool from the largest admitting hospital in America. Monographs in this series provide focused, relevant training to individuals and organizations on a wide variety of healthcare and leadership topics.Ideal for healthcare professionals, leadership innovators, researchers, teachers, students, and other pioneering professionals each volume provides the latest information and break-through thinking on the subject in a clear, concise, readable form.

The Measure of Our Days

New Beginnings at Life's End

Author: Jerome E. Groopman

Publisher: Viking Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Self-Help

Page: 238

View: 6661

A physician recounts his experiences with the dying and details how different people react to a diagnosis of terminal illness

The Anatomy of Hope

How People Prevail in the Face of Illness

Author: Jerome Groopman

Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks

ISBN: 0375757759

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 248

View: 1426

Explores the diverse ways in which hope and other positive emotions influence the healing process, drawing on real-life experiences to analyze the biology of hope, as well as its benefits and limits.

Hippocrates' Shadow

Author: David H. Newman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416551549

Category: Medical

Page: 272

View: 3575

An emergency physician discusses the importance of a doctor's honesty and communication as part of connecting personally with patients, in an account that challenges popular opinions about such topics as pharmaceuticals, standardized testing, and CPR. Reprint.

How Patients Should Think

10 Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Drugs, Tests, and Treatment

Author: Ray Moynihan,Melissa Sweet

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781605980478

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 234

View: 9935

In the heat of the moment, it is difficult to know what to ask our doctor so that we can reach the best possible solution or treatment. How can a doctor know to go through a list of risks, treatments and alternatives if the patient does not ask? This list of ten open-ended questions can help every type of patient get some control over the decisions that affect their help. Covering everything from tests to drugs to lifestyle issues, any or all of these ten questions can guide you to better decisions whether you've been told you have high cholesterol, your child has an ear infection, or that you need a CAT scan.

When Doctors Don't Listen

How to Avoid Misdiagnoses and Unnecessary Tests

Author: Leana Wen,Joshua Kosowsky

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 0312594917

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 352

View: 5846

Discusses how to avoid harmful medical mistakes, offering advice on such topics as working with a busy doctor, communicating the full story of an illness, evaluating test risks, and obtaining a working diagnosis.

Every Patient Tells a Story

Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis

Author: Lisa Sanders

Publisher: Harmony

ISBN: 0767922476

Category: Medical

Page: 276

View: 9417

A Yale School of Medicine physician, columnist for "Diagnosis," and technical advisor for the television show House shares the experiences of doctors facing complex medical mysteries in order to illustrate the art and science of diagnosis. Reprint. A New York Times extended-list bestseller.

Being Mortal

Medicine and What Matters in the End

Author: Atul Gawande

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN: 1627790551

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 1638

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extend suffering. Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person's last weeks or months may be rich and dignified. Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, Being Mortal asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.

Modern Death

How Medicine Changed the End of Life

Author: Haider Warraich

Publisher: Gerald Duckworth & Co

ISBN: 0715652400

Category: Medical

Page: 336

View: 7704

Nothing is more certain in life than death. Yet recent advances in medicine and technology have dramatically increased our life expectancy, and everything about when, where, how and why we die has changed. The result is that dying is today a more prolonged and harrowing experience than ever before. In Modern Death, the physician and clinical researcher Haider Warraich draws on his expert personal experience as well as on history, culture, theology and legal theory, to tackle important ethical questions that go right to the heart of what it is to be human. He reveals what dying really means in today’s medical industrial complex, discusses the ethics of patient proxies, living wills and the right to die, and argues in favour of giving terminally ill patients the right to physician-assisted death. Written by an insightful, new voice in the conversation about death and dying, Modern Death is a heartfelt and inspiring book offering an unabashedly honest perspective, exploring how we can and must do better by the ones we love.

Seeing Patients

Author: Augustus A. White III, M.D.,Augustus A White,David Chanoff

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674058771

Category: Medical

Page: 352

View: 3902

This book uses the story of one of the authors, Gus White, as a way to talk about unconscious biases and their consequences to the medical profession and beyond. White is an orthopedic surgeon, who grew up in Tennessee under Jim Crow, went to Brown, and was the only black student at Stanford Medical School. He was the first black chief resident at Yale, the only black surgeon in Vietnam, and was the first black chief of service in a Harvard teaching hospital. His life spans an enormous change in American race relations, and he has many eye opening stories to tell. His description of his early years in an extremely segregated and racist society now reads like something from another world. White and Chanoff want to use the autobiographical approach of this book to show how great the disparities still are, and make the case for “culturally competent” medical training, in a way that is more vivid and memorable than a research review or policy paper. The book looks at White’s life, but always with an eye to what moved him to the idea of equality in medicine and problems of disparities in medicine.

Doing Harm

The Truth About How Bad Medicine and Lazy Science Leave Women Dismissed, Misdiagnosed, and Sick

Author: Maya Dusenbery

Publisher: HarperCollins

ISBN: 0062470817

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 400

View: 8516

In this shocking, hard-hitting expose in the tradition of Naomi Klein and Barbara Ehrenreich, the editorial director of Feministing.com, reveals how inadequate, inappropriate, and even dangerous treatment threatens women’s lives and well-being. Editor of the award-winning site Feministing.com, Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with experts within and outside the medical establishment, and personal stories from women across the country to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today. Dusenbery reveals how conditions that disproportionately affect women, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic pain conditions, and Alzheimer’s disease, are neglected and woefully under-researched. "Contested" diseases, such as fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, that are 70 to 80 percent female-dominated are so poorly understood that they have not yet been fully accepted as "real" conditions by the whole of the profession. Meanwhile, despite a wealth of evidence showing the impact of biological difference between the sexes in everything from drug responses to symptoms to risk factors for various diseases—even the symptoms of a heart attack!—medicine continues to take a one-size-fits-all approach: that of a 70 kilogram white man. In addition, women are negatively impacted by the biases and stereotypes that dismiss them as "chronic complainers," leading to long delays—often years long—to get diagnosed. The consequences are catastrophic. Offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its effects, Doing Harm will change the way we look at healthcare for women.