How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate

Author: Andrew J. Hoffman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 120

View: 724

Though the scientific community largely agrees that climate change is underway, debates about this issue remain fiercely polarized. These conversations have become a rhetorical contest, one where opposing sides try to achieve victory through playing on fear, distrust, and intolerance. At its heart, this split no longer concerns carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, or climate modeling; rather, it is the product of contrasting, deeply entrenched worldviews. This brief examines what causes people to reject or accept the scientific consensus on climate change. Synthesizing evidence from sociology, psychology, and political science, Andrew J. Hoffman lays bare the opposing cultural lenses through which science is interpreted. He then extracts lessons from major cultural shifts in the past to engender a better understanding of the problem and motivate the public to take action. How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate makes a powerful case for a more scientifically literate public, a more socially engaged scientific community, and a more thoughtful mode of public discourse.

How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate

Author: Andrew Hoffman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 120

View: 505

Rather thanpointers to improve the dialogue about this pressing issue in hopes of finding common ground. attributing fault lines in the climate debate to rival scientific theories, this brief argues that the public is split by opposing cultural views through which science is interpreted. After considering how the media, social norms, and psychological factors cause us to accept or reject climate change, Andrew J. Hoffman provides

Culture, Space and Climate Change

Vulnerability and Resilience in European Coastal Areas

Author: Thorsten Heimann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 300

View: 735

Ways of handling climate change vary worldwide. Differences can be observed in the perception of potential threats and opportunities as well as in the appraisal of adequate coping strategies. Collective efforts often fail not because of technical restrictions, but as a result of social and cultural differences between the actors involved. Consequently, there is a need to explore in greater depth those zones of cultural friction which emerge when actors deal with climate change. This book examines how cultural differences in the handling of climate change can be described and explained. The work develops the concept of culture as relational space, elaborates explanatory approaches, and investigates them by surveying more than 800 actors responsible for spatial development of the European coastal regions in the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and Poland. In doing so, this book engages with debates on cultural globalisation, in which the attachment of culture to place is increasingly being questioned. Adopting the approach of culture as relational space allows possible cultural formations to be examined across diverse fields of application from the local to the global scale. In addition, the book investigates how far different value orientations, beliefs, and identities can explain diverse perceptions of problems and opportunities right up to preferences for climate-mitigation and adaptation measures. Providing comprehensive insights into the diverse zones of cultural friction which scholars and practitioners face when handling climate change locally and globally, this book will be of great interest to those studying climate change, environmental sociology, and sustainable planning.

Communicating Climate Change

A Guide for Educators

Author: Anne K. Armstrong

Publisher: Comstock Publishing Associates

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 144

View: 738

Environmental educators face a formidable challenge when they approach climate change due to the complexity of the science and of the political and cultural contexts in which people live. There is a clear consensus among climate scientists that climate change is already occurring as a result of human activities, but high levels of climate change awareness and growing levels of concern have not translated into meaningful action. Communicating Climate Change provides environmental educators with an understanding of how their audiences engage with climate change information as well as with concrete, empirically tested communication tools they can use to enhance their climate change program. Starting with the basics of climate science and climate change public opinion, Armstrong, Krasny, and Schuldt synthesize research from environmental psychology and climate change communication, weaving in examples of environmental education applications throughout this practical book. Each chapter covers a separate topic, from how environmental psychology explains the complex ways in which people interact with climate change information to communication strategies with a focus on framing, metaphors, and messengers. This broad set of topics will aid educators in formulating program language for their classrooms at all levels. Communicating Climate Change uses fictional vignettes of climate change education programs and true stories from climate change educators working in the field to illustrate the possibilities of applying research to practice. Armstrong et al, ably demonstrate that environmental education is an important player in fostering positive climate change dialogue and subsequent climate change action. An open access version of this book is available through Cornell Open.

Teaching Climate Change to Adolescents

Reading, Writing, and Making a Difference

Author: Richard Beach

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 158

View: 235

CO-PUBLISHED BY ROUTLEDGE AND THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF TEACHERS OF ENGLISH Teaching Climate Change to Adolescents is THE essential resource for middle and high school English language arts teachers to help their students understand and address the urgent issues and challenges facing life on Earth today. Classroom activities written and used by teachers show students posing questions, engaging in argumentative reading and writing and critical analysis, interpreting portrayals of climate change in literature and media, and adopting advocacy stances to promote change. The book illustrates climate change fitting into existing courses using already available materials and gives teachers tools and teaching ideas to support building this into their own classrooms. A variety of teacher and student voices makes for an appealing, fast-paced, and inspiring read. Visit the website for this book for additional information and links. All royalties from the sale of this book are donated to Alliance for Climate Education.

Climate Change Politics and Policies in America: Historical and Modern Documents in Context [2 volumes]

Author: Jerald C. Mast

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 700

View: 464

This collection of primary sources, illuminated by extensive contextual analysis, provides a comprehensive and balanced survey of the evolution of global climate change policies and politics in the United States. • Offers more than 100 essential primary documents track the evolution of climate change politics in the United States from the mid-twentieth century to the present • Provides a chronological arrangement of chapters for easy understanding • Presents original overview essays and document-specific headnotes to contextualize each historical and political primary source • Covers scientific studies and reports to explain how they have shaped the trajectory of climate change policymaking in the United States