A History of Medieval Europe

From Constantine to Saint Louis

Author: Ralph Henry Carless Davis

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Europe

Page: 429

View: 542

To many of us the history of Europe from the age of Constantine to the middle of the thirteenth century is dark and confused. In his successful book, which is based on background lectures to students, Professor Davis has concentrated on the most important topics, and largely on western European themes, to provide a well-lighted and comprehensible pattern. In Part I, the Dark Ages, he begins with the new capital of the Roman Empire and the impact of the barbarian invasions. Then follow studies of the Church and the Papacy and of the rise of Islam. After chapters on the rise and fall of the Frankish empire, the part ends with an economic survey of Europe at the end of the ninth century. The second half of the book begins with the Saxon Empire and has chapters on monasticism, the reform of the Papacy, the Crusades and the feudal monarchy in France. It concludes with accounts of St. Francis, Frederick II and Louis IX. One of the unusual features of Part II is the completion of each chapter with translations of original documents giving the reader not only entertainment but also a hint of the sources of the writing of history. Professor Davis has a clear style, an eye for the essential and an ear for the apt quotation. He has written an admirable introduction, at the level of first-year undergraduates, to a fascinating but difficult period of history. It is now issued in paperback for the first time.

A History of Medieval Europe

From Constantine to Saint Louis

Author: R.H.C. Davis

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 478

R.C. Davis provided the classic account of the European medieval world; equipping generations of undergraduate and ‘A’ level students with sufficient grasp of the period to debate diverse historical perspectives and reputations. His book has been important grounding for both modernists required to take a course in medieval history, and those who seek to specialise in the medieval period. In updating this classic work to a third edition, the additional author now enables students to see history in action; the diverse viewpoints and important research that has been undertaken since Davis’ second edition, and progressed historical understanding. Each of Davis original chapters now concludes with a ‘new directions and developments’ section by Professor RI Moore, Emeritus of Newcastle University. A key work updated in a method that both enhances subject understanding and sets important research in its wider context. A vital resource, now up-to-date for generations of historians to come.

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Author: Colum Hourihane

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 677

View: 348

This volume offers unparalleled coverage of all aspects of art and architecture from medieval Western Europe, from the 6th century to the early 16th century. Drawing upon the expansive scholarship in the celebrated 'Grove Dictionary of Art' and adding hundreds of new entries, it offers students, researchers and the general public a reliable, up-to-date, and convenient resource covering this field of major importance in the development of Western history and international art and architecture.

Forthcoming Books

Author: R.R. Bowker Company

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: American literature

Page:

View: 400

Early Ukraine

A Military and Social History to the Mid–19th Century

Author: Alexander Basilevsky

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 566

As the Dark Ages enveloped Europe, a civilization was born on the banks of the Dnieper River. Rus—whose capital at Kiev surpassed in grandeur most cities of Europe—was home to the Ukrainian people, whose princes made war on Constantinople and established the city states of what would become Russia. The cities of Rus were destroyed by the Mongols, their remains falling to the Polish-Lithuanian kingdom. With the steppe restored to wilderness, the “kraina” borderlands of the hardy frontiersmen known as Cossacks—who in the 17th century destroyed powerful Polish, Lithuanian and Muscovite armies—gained Ukrainian independence and established a unique social order. Drawing on English, Ukrainian and French sources, this book chronicles the military and social origins of Ukraine and describes the differences between Ukraine and its neighbors. The author refutes the claim that Ukraine and Russia were once united in a common political system.