Henry David Thoreau

A Life

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022634469X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 615

View: 9384

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Henry David Thoreau

A Life

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022634472X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 1400

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Walden

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, American

Page: 440

View: 5190

Henry Thoreau

A Life of the Mind

Author: Robert D. Richardson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520063464

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 455

View: 7057

This biography of Henry Thoreau offers insight into his social activism, his interest in fine arts, William Gilpin and John Ruskin's influence on his nature writing, and his involvement in, and influence by, the Agassiz-Darwin debate over "The Origin of Species."

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Xist Publishing

ISBN: 1681957345

Category: Nature

Page: 235

View: 9378

A Wonderful Journey through the Forests of Maine “The mission of men there seems to be, like so many busy demons, to drive the forest out of the country.”- Henry David Thoreau, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers presents Thoreau's fullest account of the wilderness. It’s a personal story of exterior and interior discoveries in a natural setting.

Seeing New Worlds

Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Natural Science

Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press

ISBN: 9780299147433

Category: Science

Page: 232

View: 2853

Thoreau was a poet, a naturalist, a major American writer. Was he also a scientist? He was, Laura Dassow Walls suggests. Her book, the first to consider Thoreau as a serious and committed scientist, will change the way we understand his accomplishment and the place of science in American culture. Walls reveals that the scientific texts of Thoreau’s day deeply influenced his best work, from Walden to the Journal to the late natural history essays. Here we see how, just when literature and science were splitting into the “two cultures” we know now, Thoreau attempted to heal the growing rift. Walls shows how his commitment to Alexander von Humboldt’s scientific approach resulted in not only his “marriage” of poetry and science but also his distinctively patterned nature studies. In the first critical study of his “The Dispersion of Seeds” since its publication in 1993, she exposes evidence that Thoreau was using Darwinian modes of reasoning years before the appearance of Origin of Species. This book offers a powerful argument against the critical tradition that opposes a dry, mechanistic science to a warm, “organic” Romanticism. Instead, Thoreau’s experience reveals the complex interaction between Romanticism and the dynamic, law-seeking science of its day. Drawing on recent work in the theory and philosophy of science as well as literary history and theory, Seeing New Worlds bridges today’s “two cultures” in hopes of stimulating a fuller consideration of representations of nature.

I to Myself

An Annotated Selection from the Journal of Henry D. Thoreau

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300111729

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 493

View: 9931

"It was his friend Ralph Waldo Emerson, another inveterate journal keeper, who urged Thoreau to keep a record of his thoughts and observations. Begun in 1837, Thoreau's journal spans a period of twenty-five years and runs to more than two million words, coming to a halt only in 1861, shortly before the suthor's death. The handwritten journal had somewhat humble origins, but as it grew in scope and ambition it came to function as a record of Thoreau's interior life as well as the source for his books and essays. Indeed, it became the central concern of the author's literary life. Critics now recognize Thoreaus's journal as an important achievement in its own right."--From the book jacket.

Walden; Or, Life in the Woods

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486132536

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 224

View: 9556

Accounts of Thoreau's daily life on the shores of Walden Pond outside Concord, Massachusetts, are interwoven with musings on the virtues of self-reliance and individual freedom, on society, government, and other topics.

Thoreau and the Art of Life

Reflections on Nature and the Mystery of Existence

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1556438834

Category: Art

Page: 95

View: 5409

Combines nearly 100 luminous watercolor illustrations with eloquent passages from the writings of the American transcendentalist author and philosopher, in a book that draws largely from Thoreau's journals to reveal his ideas about nature, creativity, spirituality, aging and wisdom. Original.

The Adventures of Henry Thoreau

A Young Man's Unlikely Path to Walden Pond

Author: Michael Sims

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408838230

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 7711

From Mahatma Gandhi and John F. Kennedy to Martin Luther King and Leo Tolstoy, the works of Henry David Thoreau – author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, surveyor, schoolteacher, engineer – have long been an inspiration to many. But who was the unsophisticated young man who in 1837 became a protégé of Ralph Waldo Emerson? The Adventures of Henry Thoreau tells the colourful story of a complex man seeking a meaningful life in a tempestuous era. In rich, evocative prose Michael Sims brings to life the insecure, youthful Henry, as he embarks on the path to becoming the literary icon Thoreau. Using the letters and diaries of Thoreau's family, friends and students, Michael Sims charts his coming of age within a family struggling to rise above poverty in 1830s America. From skating and boating with Nathaniel Hawthorne, to travels with his brother, John Thoreau, and the launching of their progressive school, Sims paints a vivid portrait of the young writer struggling to find his voice through communing with nature, whether mountain climbing in Maine or building his life-changing cabin at Walden Pond. He explores Thoreau's infatuation with the beautiful young woman who rejected his proposal of marriage, the influence of his mother and sisters – who were passionate abolitionists – and that of the powerful cultural currents of the day. With emotion and texture, The Adventures of Henry Thoreau sheds fresh light on one of the most iconic figures in American history.

Walden and Other Writings of Henry David Thoreau

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Wildside Press

ISBN: 9781479414000

Category:

Page: 738

View: 8231

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, historian, and leading transcendentalist, best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay Resistance to Civil Government (also known as Civil Disobedience), both of which are included. also in this volume are A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers; Cape Cod; The Allegash and East Branch; Walking; Slavery in Massachusetts; A Plea for Captain John Brown; and Life Without Principle.

Life of Henry David Thoreau

Author: Henry Stephens Salt

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252019937

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 153

View: 7187

Henry Salt abandoned his mastership at Eton in the 1880s to devote himself to causes including vegetarianism, socialism, animals' rights, conservation, and prison reform. He remained a literary critic of distinction, publishing in 1890 the initial version of Thoreau's Life. With the help of American friends, he revised the book and published it anew in 1896. This third version, never before published, gives us Salt's final reading of Thoreau based on important works published up to 1908, including Thoreau's complete Journal. Combining a concise narrative of Thoreau's life with a perceptive treatment of his ideas and writings, it stands as a penetrating study of Thoreau, stressing his distinctive individuality. Through analysis of the text and a concise biography, the editors illustrate Salt's growth as a scholar and his changing views on Thoreau and Thoreau's philosophy. The introduction details Salt's significant stylistic improvements to the 1908 edition as well as the inclusion of anecdotes and facts gathered from Samuel Arthur Jones, F. B. Sanborn, Ernest W. Vickers, Raymond Adams, Fred Hosmer, and Gandhi. This volume is made complete with Salt's updated bibliography and an index by the editors. It will appeal to scholars of Thoreau and to readers interested in Thoreau, American Transcendentalism, or American literature.

Expect Great Things

The Life and Search of Henry David Thoreau

Author: Kevin Dann

Publisher: TarcherPerigee

ISBN: 9780399184673

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 400

View: 9146

Now in paperback, this thrilling, meticulous biography by naturalist and historian Kevin Dann fills a gap in our understanding of Henry Thoreau, one modern history's most important spiritual visionaries by capturing the full arc of his life as a mystic, spiritual seeker, and explorer in transcendental realms. This acclaimed, epic biography of Henry David Thoreau sees Thoreau's world as the mystic himself saw it: filled with wonder and mystery; Native American myths and lore; wood sylphs, nature spirits, and fairies; battles between good and evil; and heroic struggles to live as a natural being in an increasingly synthetic world. Above all, Expect Great Things critically and authoritatively captures Thoreau's simultaneously wild and intellectually keen sense of the mystical, mythical, and supernatural. Other historians have skipped past or undervalued these aspects of Thoreau's life. In this groundbreaking work, historian and naturalist Kevin Dann restores Thoreau's esoteric visions and explorations to their rightful place as keystones of the man himself.

Collected Essays and Poems

Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 703

View: 3777

A single-volume collection of essential writings features Thoreau's best poetry and essays on nature, materialism, conformity, and politics, including such works as "Slavery in Massachusetts," "Civil Disobedience," "A Winter Walk," "Life Without Principle," and others.

Henry David Thoreau

A Biography

Author: Milton Meltzer

Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books

ISBN: 0822558939

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 160

View: 768

Profiles the solitary student of Ralph Waldo Emerson who was well-known as a naturalist in his own time but who became posthumously famous for his writings.

Thoreau and the Language of Trees

Author: Richard Higgins

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520294041

Category: Science

Page: 248

View: 4011

Trees were central to Henry David Thoreau’s creativity as a writer, his work as a naturalist, his thought, and his inner life. His portraits of them were so perfect, it was as if he could see the sap flowing beneath their bark. When Thoreau wrote that the poet loves the pine tree as his own shadow in the air, he was speaking about himself. In short, he spoke their language. In this original book, Richard Higgins explores Thoreau’s deep connections to trees: his keen perception of them, the joy they gave him, the poetry he saw in them, his philosophical view of them, and how they fed his soul. His lively essays show that trees were a thread connecting all parts of Thoreau’s being—heart, mind, and spirit. Included are one hundred excerpts from Thoreau’s writings about trees, paired with over sixty of the author’s photographs. Thoreau’s words are as vivid now as they were in 1890, when an English naturalist wrote that he was unusually able to “to preserve the flashing forest colors in unfading light.” Thoreau and the Language of Trees shows that Thoreau, with uncanny foresight, believed trees were essential to the preservation of the world.

Henry David Thoreau for Kids

His Life and Ideas, with 21 Activities

Author: Corinne Smith

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 1613731493

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 128

View: 8045

Hands-on nature activities for the budding transcendentalist Author and naturalist Henry David Thoreau is best known for living two years along the shores of Walden Pond in Concord, Massachusetts. He is also known for spending a night in jail for nonpayment of taxes, which he discussed in the influential essay "Civil Disobedience." More than 150 years later, people are still inspired by his thoughtful words about individual rights, social justice, and nature. His detailed plant observations have even proven to be a useful record for 21st-century botanists. Henry David Thoreau for Kids chronicles the short but influential life of this remarkable thinker. In addition to learning about Thoreau's contributions to our culture, young readers will participate in engaging, hands-on projects that bring his ideas to life. Activities include building a model of the Walden cabin, keeping a daily journal, planting a garden, baking trail-bread cakes, going on a half-day hike, and starting a rock collection. The book also includes a time line and list of resources—books, websites, and places to visit—which offer even more opportunities to connect with this fascinating man.

Early Essays and Miscellanies

Author: Elizabeth Thoreau,Henry David Thoreau,William L. Howarth,Walter Roy Harding

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691062860

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 430

View: 7965

This collection of fifty-three early pieces by Thoreau represents the full range of his youthful imagination. Collected, arranged, and carefully edited for the first time here, the writings date from 1828 to 1852 and cover a broad range of subjects: learning, morals, literature, history, politics, and love. Included is a major essay on Sir Walter Raleigh that was not published during the author's lifetime and a fragmentary college piece here published for the first time. Titles of essays published in the volume are given below. Early Essays The Seasons Anxieties and Delights of a Discoverer Men Whose Pursuit Is Money Of Keeping a Private Journal "We Are Apt to Become What Others . . . Think Us to Be" Forms, Ceremonies, and Restraints of Polite Society A Man of Business, a Man of Pleasure, a Man of the World Musings Kinds of Energetic Character Privileges and Pleasures of a Literary Man Severe and Mild Punishments Popular Feeling Style May . . . Offend against Simplicity The Book of the Seasons Sir Henry Vane Literary Digressions Foreign Influence on American Literature Life and Works of Sir W. Scott The Love of Stories Cultivation of the Imagination The Greek Classic Poets The Meaning of "Fate" Whether the Government Ought to Educate Travellers & Inhabitants History . . . of the Roman Republic A Writer's Nationality and Individual Genius L'Allegro & Il Penseroso All Men Are Mad The Speeches of Moloch & the Rest People of Different Sections Gaining or Exercising Public Influence Titles of Books Sublimity The General Obligation to Tell the Truth "Being Content with Common Reasons" The Duty, Inconvenience and Dangers of Conformity Moral Excellence Barbarities of Civilized States T. Pomponius Atticus Class Book Autobiography "The Commercial Spirit of Modern Times" Miscellanies DIED . . . Miss Anna Jones Aulus Persius Flaccus The Laws of Menu Sayings of Confucius Dark Ages Chinese Four Books Homer. Ossian. Chaucer. Hermes Trismegistus . . . From the Gulistan of Saadi Sir Walter Raleigh Thomas Carlyle and His Works Love Chastity & Sensuality

Thoreau

A Sublime Life

Author: A. Dan,Maximilien Le Roy

Publisher: Nantier Beall Minoustchine Publishing

ISBN: 9781681120256

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 88

View: 9758

"To be a philosopher is not merely to have subtle thoughts, nor even to found a school, but so to love wisdom as to live according to its dictates, a life of simplicity, independence, magnanimity and trust.” This graphic novel biography relates the forward looking inspirational life of the great author, philosopher and pioneering ecologist. Henry David Thoreau was also the father of the concept, still fresh today (viz 'Occupy Wall St.’), of 'civil disobedience’ which he used against slavery and the encroachment of government.