Global Journalism

Theory and Practice

Author: Peter Berglez

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 156

View: 549

Peter Berglez sets out to develop the idea of global journalism as an epistemological updating of everyday mainstream news media. He theoretically understands and explains global journalism as a concrete practice and argues that the future of professional news journalism is about leaving behind the dominant national outlook for the sake of a more integrated (global) outlook on society.

Global Journalism Practice and New Media Performance

Author: Yusuf Kalyango, Jr.

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 262

View: 797

Global Journalism Practice and New Media Performance provides an overview of new and traditional media in their political, economic and cultural contexts while exploring the role of journalism practice and media education. The authors examine media systems in 16 countries, including China, Russia and the United States.

Journalism in Crisis

Bridging Theory and Practice for Democratic Media Strategies in Canada

Author: Mike Gasher

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Democracy

Page: 360

View: 914

Journalism in Crisis addresses the concerns of scholars, activists, and journalists committed to Canadian journalism as a democratic institution and as a set of democratic practices. The authors look within Canada and abroad for solutions for balancing the Canadian media ecology. Public policies have been central to the creation and shaping of Canada's media system and, rather than wait for new technologies or economic models, the contributors offer concrete recommendations for how public policies can foster journalism that can support democratic life in twenty-first century Canada. Their work, which includes new theoretical perspectives and valuable discussions of journalism practices in public, private, and community media, should be read by professional and citizen journalists, academics, media activists, policy makers and media audiences concerned about the future of democratic journalism in Canada.

International Journalism

Author: Kevin Williams

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 216

View: 794

"Kevin Williams has authored an account of "foreign" correspondence and international journalism that is the most comprehensively-sourced, inclusive, contextualized, timely and critical in its field. At last, we have an account that acknowledges that the largest employers of "foreign" correspondents for nearly two hundred years have been and continue to be the news agencies; that the occupation is rooted in a history of imperialism, post-colonialism and commercialization, whose vestiges today are all too apparent; that the impacts of so-called "new media" on the amount, range and quality of international news, while significant, are less dramatic and less positive than commonly supposed." - Oliver Boyd-Barrett, Bowling Green State University, Ohio What is the future of the foreign correspondent - is there one? Tracing the historical development of international reporting, Kevin Williams examines the organizational structures, occupational culture and information environment in which it is practiced to explore the argument that foreign correspondence is becoming extinct in the globalized world. Mapping the institutional, political, economic, cultural, and historical context within which news is gathered across borders, this book reveals how foreign correspondents are adapting to new global and commercial realities in how they gather, adapt and disseminate news. Lucid and engaging, the book expertly probes three global models of reporting - Anglo-American, European and the developing world - to lay bare the forces of technology, commercial constraint and globalization that are changing how journalism is practiced and understood. Essential reading for students of journalism, this is a timely and thought-provoking book for anyone who wishes to fully grasp the core issues of journalism and reporting in a global context.

Practising Global Journalism

Exploring reporting issues worldwide

Author: John Herbert

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 264

View: 766

From this book, you will gain an understanding of the global media marketplace - the technology, the players and the issues. The role of news agencies, sources and networks are explored covering the issues of ethics, global media ownership and control. Find out how journalists are using the web and learn even newer ways to collect and communicate information. Essential reading for today's practising and trainee journalists. John Herbert examines the global environment in which journalists operate and describes the latest technology and its impact on print, broadcast and online journalism practice. Practising Global Journalism is a unique overview of the profession, providing a comparative study of journalism practice worldwide. Case studies are drawn from Europe, Australia, the Asia Pacific, South Asia, China, Africa and the Americas.

The Handbook of Crisis Communication

Author: W. Timothy Coombs

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 768

View: 786

Written as a tool for both researchers and communication managers, the Handbook of Crisis Communication is a comprehensive examination of the latest research, methods, and critical issues in crisis communication. Includes in-depth analyses of well-known case studies in crisis communication, from terrorist attacks to Hurricane Katrina Explores the key emerging areas of new technology and global crisis communication Provides a starting point for developing crisis communication as a distinctive field research rather than as a sub-discipline of public relations or corporate communication

Travel Journalism

Exploring Production, Impact and Culture

Author: F. Hanusch

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 465

Contributors from diverse backgrounds explore a range of issues in relation to the media and journalism's role in ascribing meaning to tourism practices. This fascinating account offers a thoroughly international and interdisciplinary perspective on an increasingly important field of journalism scholarship.

International Journalism and Democracy

Civic Engagement Models from Around the World

Author: Angela Romano

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 266

View: 200

This book examines different models from around the world of how journalism can support deliberation — the processes in which societies recognize and discuss the issues that affect them, appraise the potential responses, and make decisions about whether and how to take action. Authors from across the globe identify the types of journalism that might best assist or even drive deliberative activity in different cultural and political contexts. Case studies from 15 nations spotlight different approaches to deliberative journalism, including strategies that have been sometimes been labeled as public or civic journalism, peace journalism, development journalism, citizen journalism, the street press, community journalism, social entrepreneurism, or other names. Each of the approaches that are described offer a distinctive potential to support deliberative democracy, but the book does not present any of these models or case studies as examples of categorical success. Rather, it explores different elements of the nature, strengths, limitations and challenges of each approach, as well as issues affecting their longer-term sustainability and effectiveness.

Patents, Pills, and the Press

The Rise and Fall of the Global HIV/AIDS Medicines Crisis in the News

Author: Thomas Owen

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: AIDS (Disease) in mass media

Page: 217

View: 616

HIV/AIDS is a global health crisis of unprecedented proportions. Afflicting millions worldwide, its social, political, economic, and ethical dimensions have rendered explicit the vast inequalities of our negatively globalized planet. Since the late 1990s, a major feature of the crisis has been the dispute over intellectual property protection and medicines access. In this book, Thomas Owen examines the mediatization of this dispute. Weaving together contemporary media theory and interdisciplinary research with computer-assisted news analysis and interviews with journalists and civil society campaigners, the book illuminates the intersecting constitutive relationships between global crises, global governance, and global media. In a context of changing media technologies, logics, and practices, this book observes where the mediatized conflict surrounding global medicines access has at times consolidated elite political economic power, and at other times provided civil society campaigners their greatest opportunities for global social change. With an interdisciplinary approach, this book is suitable for courses on global media communication and global journalism, as well as advanced undergraduate and postgraduate courses in public health communication, political communication, social movement studies, and international relations.

Political Communication in China

Convergence or Divergence Between the Media and Political System?

Author: Wenfang Tang

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 138

View: 470

It is widely recognised that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) uses the media to set the agenda for political discourse, propagate official policies, monitor public opinion, and rally regime support. State agencies in China control the full spectrum of media programming, either through ownership or the power to regulate. Political Communication in China examines the two factors which have contributed to the rapid development of media infrastructure in China: technology and commercialization. Economic development led to technological advancement, which in turn brought about the rapid modernization of all forms of communication, from ‘old’ media such as television to the Internet, cell phones, and satellite communications. This volume examines how these recent developments have affected the relationship between the CCP and the mass media as well as the implications of this evolving relationship for understanding Chinese citizens’ media use, political attitudes, and behaviour. The chapters in this book represent a diverse range of research methods, from surveys, content analysis, and field interviews to the manipulation of aggregate statistical data. The result is a lively debate which creates many opportunities for future research into the fundamental question of convergence between political and media regimes. This book was originally published as a special issue of the journal Political Communication.