Gleanings from Old S. Paul's

Author: W Sparrow 1828-1897 Simpson

Publisher: Franklin Classics

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 336

View: 817

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Art and Magic in the Court of the Stuarts

Author: Vaughan Hart

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 665

Spanning from the inauguration of James I in 1603 to the execution of Charles I in 1649, the Stuart court saw the emergence of a full expression of Renaissance culture in Britain. Hart examines the influence of magic on Renaissance art and how in its role as an element of royal propaganda, art was used to represent the power of the monarch and reflect his apparent command over the hidden forces of nature. Court artists sought to represent magic as an expression of the Stuart Kings' divine right, and later of their policy of Absolutism, through masques, sermons, heraldry, gardens, architecture and processions. As such, magic of the kind enshrined in Neoplatonic philosophy and the court art which expressed its cosmology, played their part in the complex causes of the Civil War and the destruction of the Stuart image which followed in its wake.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

Author: Frank Leslie Cross

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 1800

View: 341

Uniquely authoritative and wide-ranging in its scope, The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church is the indispensable one-volume reference work on all aspects of the Christian Church. It contains over 6,000 cross-referenced A-Z entries, and offers unrivalled coverage of all aspects of thisvast and often complex subject, from theology; churches and denominations; patristic scholarship; and the bible; to the church calendar and its organization; popes; archbishops; saints; and mystics. In this revision, innumerable small changes have been made to take into account shifts in scholarly opinion, recent developments, such as the Church of England's new prayer book (Common Worship), RC canonizations, ecumenical advances and mergers, and, where possible, statistics. A number of existingarticles have been rewritten to reflect new evidence or understanding, for example the Holy Sepulchre entry, and there are a few new articles, on Desmond Tutu and Padre Pio, for example. Perhaps most significantly, a great number of the bibliographies have been updated. Established since its first appearance in 1957 as an essential resource for ordinands, clergy, and members of religious orders; ODCC is an invaluable tool for academics, teachers, and students of church history and theology, as well as for the general reader. THEOLOGY- the development of doctrines throughout the ages, with their philosophical background and the different traditions of the major Churches- spirituality and heresy- history of the Reformation and Counter-ReformationPATRISTIC SCHOLARSHIP: Fathers of the Church, on whose work later theology is founded, are covered in detail, for example- the Nag Hammadi papyri and their significance for our understanding of Gnosticism- the problems of Marcarius of Egypt and Macarius/Simeon are explored- the recently discovered sermons of Augustine are mentioned, with their places of publication listedCHURCHES AND DENOMINATIONS- the beliefs and structures of both the mainstream and lesser-known denominations such as Amish, Muggletonians, Shakers, and Wee Frees- lengthy articles on the history of Christianity throughout the world, in countries such as Angola, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the Philippines, Poland, Spain, the United States, Vietnam, and ZaireTHE CHURCH CALENDAR AND ORGANIZATION- feast and saints' days- Sacraments- church services, offices, rites, and practices- canon law including Catholic revision- councils and synods- religious ordersTHE BIBLE- individual Biblical Books- major figures from Abraham, Moses, and King David to St Paul and the Evangelists- schools of Biblical criticism and entries on their chief exponentsBIOGRAPHICAL ENTRIES- these are wide ranging and include saints, popes, patriarchs, and archbishops- emperors, kings, and other rulers- mystics, heretics, and reformers- theologians and philosophers, with a summary of their opinions- artists, poets, and musicians

The Culture of Cloth in Early Modern England

Textual Constructions of a National Identity

Author: Dr Roze Hentschell

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 218

View: 504

Through its exploration of the intersections between the culture of the wool broadcloth industry and the literature of the early modern period, this study contributes to the expanding field of material studies in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. The author argues that it is impossible to comprehend the development of emerging English nationalism during that time period, without considering the culture of the cloth industry. She shows that, reaching far beyond its status as a commodity of production and exchange, that industry was also a locus for organizing sentiments of national solidarity across social and economic divisions. Hentschell looks to textual productions-both imaginative and non-fiction works that often treat the cloth industry with mythic importance-to help explain how cloth came to be a catalyst for nationalism. Each chapter ties a particular mode, such as pastoral, prose romance, travel propaganda, satire, and drama, with a specific issue of the cloth industry, demonstrating the distinct work different literary genres contributed to what the author terms the 'culture of cloth'.

Ecclesiastical London

Author: Mary Carpenter Erler

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 483

View: 239

Continuing in the tradition established by previous volumes of the Records of Early English Drama, Ecclesiastical London presents the ecclesiastically-generated dramatic records of London, notably its parishes and St. Paul's Cathedral. Among the topics addressed by editor Mary Erler are parish calendar customs such as hocking and maying, parish pageant cars and costumes, and the widespread popularity of boy bishops and of Palm Sunday prophets throughout London. Erler also looks at St. Paul's choristers' theatre under master Sebastian Westcote and examines its controversial venue. Among the many primary source materials examined in this volume are records from London's religious houses and parish accounts, as well as episcopal visitation injunctions and other documents of control and authority at the time. Ecclesiastical London concludes with ten invaluable appendices that look at subjects from Paul's Cross sermons to boy bishops. This volume presents a significant amount of new information about the history of drama in London, including discussion of a previously unknown performance by 'the clerks of London' in 1391-92, and the 1540 inventory of Henry Walton, which contains two substantial collections of costumes, identifying Walton as an important theatrical entrepreneur of the mid sixteenth century. This extensively researched volume is an important addition to the REED series and will be fascinating to those interested in the history of London and of the theatre in general.