From Slavery to Freedom

Author: Evelyn Higginbotham

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 218

From Slavery to Freedom remains the most revered, respected, and honored text on the market. The preeminent history of African Americans, this best-selling text charts the journey of African Americans from their origins in Africa, through slavery in the Western Hemisphere, struggles for freedom in the West Indies, Latin America, and the United States, various migrations, and the continuing quest for racial equality. Building on John Hope Franklin's classic work, the ninth edition has been thoroughly rewritten by the award-winning scholar Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham. It includes new chapters and updated information based on the most current scholarship. With a new narrative that brings intellectual depth and fresh insight to a rich array of topics, the text features greater coverage of ancestral Africa, African American women, differing expressions of protest, local community activism, black internationalism, civil rights and black power, as well as the election of our first African American president in 2008. The text also has a fresh new 4-color design with new charts, maps, photographs, paintings, and illustrations.

From Slavery to Freedom

Author: Evelyn Higginbotham

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 899

Encyclopedia of Local History

Author: Carol Kammen

Publisher: AltaMira Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 668

View: 328

The Encyclopedia of Local History addresses nearly every aspect of local history, including everyday issues, theoretical approaches, and trends in the field. The second edition highlights local history practice in each U.S. state and Canadian province.

American Civil War: The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection [6 volumes]

The Definitive Encyclopedia and Document Collection

Author: Spencer C. Tucker

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 2777

View: 991

This expansive, multivolume reference work provides a broad, multidisciplinary examination of the Civil War period ranging from pre-Civil War developments and catalysts such as the Mexican-American War to the rebuilding of the war-torn nation during Reconstruction.

African American Children and Families in Child Welfare

Cultural Adaptation of Services

Author: Ramona Denby

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 366

This text proposes corrective action to improve the institutional care of African American children and their families, calling attention to the specific needs of this population and the historical, social, and political factors that have shaped its experience within the child welfare system. The authors critique policy and research and suggest culturally targeted program and policy responses for more positive outcomes.

Racial Stereotyping and Child Development

Author: Diana T. Slaughter-Defoe

Publisher: Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 119

View: 132

In contemporary societies children's racial identity is co-constructed in response to racial stereotyping with extended family, peers and teachers, and potent media sources. The studies in this volume take cognizance of earlier research into skin colour and racial stereotyping, but advance its contemporary implications.

A Warring Nation

Honor, Race, and Humiliation in America and Abroad

Author: Bertram Wyatt-Brown

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 765

In this culminating work of a long and distinguished career, historian Bertram Wyatt-Brown looks at the theme of honor—a subject on which he was the acknowledged expert—and places it in a broader historical and cultural context than ever before. Wyatt-Brown begins with the contention that honor cannot be understood without considering the role of humiliation, which not only sets victor apart from vanquished but drives the search for vindication that is integral to notions of honor. The American conception of honor is further deepened by issues of race. The author turns to the slave South to show how white and black concepts of honor differed from and contradicted each other, illuminating honor’s elusive but powerful role in our society. He then goes on to explore these themes within a wide range of military and political contexts, from the Revolutionary War to Desert Storm, providing new insights on how honor drove decision making during many defining events in our history that continue to reverberate in the American mind.

Passing the Ancestral Torch: the Life, Times, Struggles, and Legacy of Theodore Roosevelt Spikes

Author: Dr. Rufus O. Jimerson

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 128

View: 233

This book starts with Theodore Roosevelt Spikes being raised as an African-American male in the Jim Crow south. It looks at the hostility, intimidation and terrorism he faced along with his family and every Africa-American in the apartheid south. As a result of the climate of fear, hatred, lynching, and mob rule, Roosevelt and his family joined other African-Americans in the Great Migration to northern cities. He got involved in the Afro-centric cultural renaissance of the 1920s; the New Deal, and community service Pre- and Post World War II as Lodge Secretary of the Prince Hall Masons. The book also looks at the history of the Prince Hall Masons as the conveyors of off-world African civilizations, innovations, and secrets of the missing link. This secret legacy is passed on through the deeds of their emulating Star Children who ascend to Renaissance Men and Women.