Early Modern Englishwomen Testing Ideas

Author: Dr Paul Salzman

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 158

View: 821

Early Modern Englishwomen Testing Ideas explores how women in England participated in the considerable intellectual and cultural diversity which characterised the 'late' early modern period, from the mid-seventeenth century to the early eighteenth century. This collection looks particularly at early modern women philosophers, playwrights and novelists, and considers how they engaged with ideas and debates over philosophical and scientific ideas, as well as literary innovations. This volume extends our understanding of the philosophical ideas and literary innovations of the early modern period and presents an exciting collection of women writers vigorously engaged with the intellectual debates that were occurring in the rapidly changing post-Restoration society.

Diversity and Difference in Early Modern London

Author: Professor Jacob Selwood

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 941

London in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was a surprisingly diverse place, home not just to people from throughout the British Isles but to a significant population of French and Dutch immigrants, to travelers and refugees from beyond Europe's borderlands and, from the 1650s, to a growing Jewish community. Yet although we know much about the population of the capital of early modern England, we know little about how Londoners conceived of the many peoples of their own city. Diversity and Difference in Early Modern London seeks to rectify this, addressing the question of how the inhabitants of the metropolis ordered the heterogeneity around them. Rather than relying upon literary or theatrical representations, this study emphasizes day-to-day practice, drawing upon petitions, government records, guild minute books and taxation disputes along with plays and printed texts. It shows how the people of London defined belonging and exclusion in the course of their daily actions, through such prosaic activities as the making and selling of goods, the collection of taxes and the daily give and take of guild politics. This book demonstrates that encounters with heterogeneity predate either imperial expansion or post-colonial immigration. In doing so it offers a perspective of interest both to scholars of the early modern English metropolis and to historians of race, migration, imperialism and the wider Atlantic world. An empirical examination of civic economics, taxation and occupational politics that asks broader questions about multiculturalism and Englishness, this study speaks not just to the history of immigration in London itself, but to the wider debate about evolving notions of national identity in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Europe Rehoused

Author: Elizabeth Denby

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 342

View: 756

Europe Rehoused was one of the most influential housing texts of the 1930s, and is still widely cited. Written by the housing consultant Elizabeth Denby (1894-1965) it offered a survey of the nearly two decades of social housing built across Europe since the end of World War One, with the aim of informing British policy makers; as a reviewer declared ‘it has a decidedly propagandist flavour’. Denby was a leading figure in housing debates in the 1930s. Adopting a line in sharp critique of what she saw as the entirely materialist approach of state housing policy, Denby advocated the incorporation of social amenities alongside well-designed and equipped flats and houses, ideally sited within urban areas; by the late 1930s she was a pioneering advocate of the concept of mixed development. Europe Rehoused is divided into two parts. The first considered the origins of the housing problem of the inter-war decades, which Denby dated to the onset of the Industrial Revolution. She then examined the various national factors which influenced the problem: climate, post-war economy and the nature of land ownership. Finally she discussed the financial aspect: the bodies responsible for house building and the nature of the subsidies available for building. This was very much a schematic survey and the second, and largest, part of the book was devoted to individual studies of European practice, and discussed ‘two winners in the War, two losers and two neutrals’: Sweden, Holland, Germany, Vienna, Italy and France. This section was completed with a concluding chapter in which she compared continental work with the British system, and the lessons that could be learnt in this country from abroad. Although Denby’s book was not the only one of its sort, its importance lies in its polemical nature and its advocacy of a rehousing policy which would become widely adopted after WWII. Significant too, is that the book is the voice of a woman who had assumed a significant status as a housing expert in the inter-war decades; Walter Gropius, who wrote the introduction to the US edition of the book observed that the book ‘carried the weight of perfect expertness.’ Such voices have for too long been overlooked, yet Denby was formed part of a very strong tradition of women reformers who worked to re-shape the inter-war and post-war British built environment.

The Life of a Travelling Physician

From His First Introduction to Practice; Including Twenty Years' Wanderings Through the Greater Part of Europe ...

Author: Sir George Lefevre

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Europe

Page:

View: 444

Medical Informatics Europe '99

Author: Peter Kokol

Publisher: Ios PressInc

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 1009

View: 397

This volume seeks to reflect the state of the art on medical informatics. It presents ideas that will guide the process of medical informatics. Topics in the book include: information systems in health care and medicine; telemedicine and telematics; security; biomedical processing, data mining and knowledge discovery; training and education; Internet/intranet; resources management; intelligent medical systems; health guidelines and protocols; electronic patient encounter, card technology, electronic data interchange; terminology; nursing informatics.

Biological Consequences of the European Expansion, 1450-1800

Author: Kenneth F. Kiple

Publisher: Variorum

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 376

View: 383

'Wherever the European has trod, death seems to pursue the aboriginal.' So wrote Charles Darwin in 1836. Though there has been considerable discussion concerning their precise demographic impact, reflected in the articles here, there is no doubt that the arrival of new diseases with the Europeans (such as typhus and smallpox) had a catastrophic effect on the indigenous population of the Americas, and later of the Pacific. In the Americas, malaria and yellow fever also came with the slaves from Africa, themselves imported to work the depopulated land. These diseases placed Europeans at risk too, and with some resistance to both disease pools, Africans could have a better chance of survival. Also covered here is the controversy over the origins of syphilis, while the final essays look at agricultural consequences of the European expansion, in terms of nutrition both in North America and in Europe.