Europe in the Eighteenth Century 1713-1789

Author: M.S. Anderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317879643

Category: History

Page: 478

View: 8876

For 1st and 2nd year undergraduate courses in Modern European History in departments of history. Also, higher level courses on enlightenment.This book provides a wide-ranging account and discussion of the history of Europe from 1713-1789. As well as political events, problems and institutions, it looks at the economic life of the continent, social structures and problems and intellectual and religious life. It also covers all aspects of Europe's relations with the rest of the world during a key period in European history.

Europe in the eighteenth century, 1713-1783

Author: Matthew Smith Anderson

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 539

View: 8652

The first edition of this book was hailed by the journal History as 'much the best English textbook in the field', and the third, fully revised, edition is likely to keep it so. Professor Anderson surveys all aspects of European life in the eighteenth century. As before, most of the discussion is on a continent-wide basis; the British Isles are treated as an integral part of the continent; and the book is particularly strong in the attention it devotes to the important but often neglected nations of eastern Europe. It also deals with the European colonial empires, and with the extra-European cultural influences that now affected the life the continent. Furthermore, this edition draws together all the recent important scholarship on the period.

Europe in the Sixteenth Century

Author: H.G. Koenigsberger,George L. Mosse,G.Q. Bowler

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317875877

Category: History

Page: 560

View: 4794

This bestselling, seminal book - a general survey of Europe in the era of `Rennaisance and Reformation' - was originally published in Denys Hay's famous Series, `A General History of Europe'. It looks at sixteenth-century Europe as a complex but interconnected whole, rather than as a mosaic of separate states. The authors explore its different aspects through the various political structures of the age - empires, monarchies, city-republics - and how they functioned and related to one another. A strength of the book remains the space it devotes to the growing importance of town-life in the sixteenth century, and to the economic background of political change.

Europe in the Seventeenth Century

Author: Donald Pennington

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317870972

Category: History

Page: 636

View: 8418

As before, the second edition of this widely-used survey is in two main parts. The first analyses the major themes of seventeenth-century European history on a continent-wide basis. The second part moves on to outline political, diplomatic and military events in the various states and nations of the time. For the second edition all the chapters have been rewritten to take account of recent scholarship. Moreover, many new topics are discussed: the family; crime; the impact of printing; climate; population and social mobility; Islam in seventeenth-century Europe. Throughout, the book emphasises current lines of research and controversy to illustrate that the history of the period is a process of enquiry and argument rather than incontrovertible fact.

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 3885

The History of Civilization

From the Fall of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution

Author: François Guizot

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Civilization

Page: N.A

View: 8913

Europe in the Eighteenth Century

Aristocracy and the Bourgeois Challenge

Author: George F. E. Rudé

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674269217

Category: History

Page: 290

View: 9927

Europe in the Eighteenth Century is a social history of Europe in all its aspects: economic, political, diplomatic military, colonial-expansionist. Crisply and succinctly written, it describes Europe not through a history of individual countries, but in a common context during the three quarters of a century between the death of Louis XIV and the industrial revolution in England and the social and political revolution in France. It presents the development of government, institutions, cities, economies, wars, and the circulation of ideas in terms of social pressures and needs, and stresses growth, interrelationships, and conflict of social classes as agents of historical change, paying particular attention to the role of popular, as well as upper- and middle-class, protest as a factor in that change.

Subversive Words

Public Opinion in Eighteenth-century France

Author: Arlette Farge

Publisher: Penn State Press

ISBN: 9780271014326

Category: History

Page: 219

View: 3559

From the book: "Paris was fond of stormy weather and emerging toads; the thirst for knowledge was supreme, and the first to read and reread the news were the first to render it with criticism. Authors and readers, great and small, all shared the impression that they were caught between truth and falsehood, and moreover that the 'probable-improbable' they relished so much was being manipulated by the complex strategies of the court, the police and the petty hordes of the evil-minded. We cannot understand the curiosity of the Parisian public without realizing that they did at least know one thing: the extent they were being made fools of." The eighteenth century was awash with rumor and talk. The words and opinions of ordinary people filled the streets of Paris. But were these simply the isolated grumblings and gossip of the crowd, or is it possible to speak of genuine "public opinion" among the common people? This is the subject of Subversive Words, the newest book by French historian Arlette Farge. Farge begins with Jürgen Habermas's notion of a bourgeois public sphere. However, whereas Habermas was concerned mostly with the "cultured classes," Farge focuses on the uneducated common people. Drawing on chronicles, newspapers, memoirs, police reports, and news sheets from the time, she finds that by the second half of the eighteenth century ordinary Parisians had come to assert their right to hold and declare clear opinions on what was happening in their city--visible, real, everyday events such as executions, price rises, and revolts. Yet the government preferred to regard ordinary Parisians as unsophisticated, impulsive, or inept. In the years leading up to the Revolution, however, the administration increasingly feared the mobilization of these people. Officially, it denied the existence of any distinct popular public opinion, but in practice it kept the streets of Paris under regular surveillance through a system of spies, inspectors, and observers. Amid this curious tension between denial and action, Farge argues, popular rumors arose and gained a life of their own. Wise and filled with vivid descriptions of everyday life, Subversive Words is cultural and intellectual history at its best.

Cracking the AP European History Exam

Author: Kenneth Pearl

Publisher: Princeton Review

ISBN: 0375428917

Category: History

Page: 442

View: 678

Reviews subjects on the test, offers tips on test-taking strategies, and includes two full-length practice exams with answers and explanations.

Europe in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries

Author: Denys Hay

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 131787191X

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 4685

The second edition of this highly successful textbook analyses the structure of later medieval society in Europe, identifies its main groups and their political programmes, and examines their impact on the political, economic and social history of the major European states. There are many additions and expansions in this new edition, and the important chapter on the Central Monarchies (of Poland, Hungary, Bohemia, Rumania and Lithuania) has been newly contributed by Professor J M Bak of the University of British Columbia.

The Great Wave

Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History

Author: David Hackett Fischer

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199741069

Category: History

Page: 552

View: 4235

David Hackett Fischer, one of our most prominent historians, has garnered a reputation for making history come alive--even stories as familiar as Paul Revere's ride, or as complicated as the assimilation of British culture in North America. Now, in The Great Wave, Fischer has done it again, marshaling an astonishing array of historical facts in lucid and compelling prose to outline a history of prices--"the history of change," as Fischer puts it--covering the dazzling sweep of Western history from the medieval glory of Chartres to the modern day. Going far beyond the economic data, Fischer writes a powerful history of the people of the Western world: the economic patterns they lived in, and the politics, culture, and society that they created as a result. As he did in Albion's Seed and Paul Revere's Ride, two of the most talked-about history books in recent years, Fischer combines extensive research and meticulous scholarship with wonderfully evocative writing to create a book for scholars and general readers alike. Records of prices are more abundant than any other quantifiable data, and span the entire range of history, from tables of medieval grain prices to the overabundance of modern statistics. Fischer studies this wealth of data, creating a narrative that encompasses all of Western culture. He describes four waves of price revolutions, each beginning in a period of equilibrium: the High Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and finally the Victorian Age. Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse. The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent--the only time in Europe's history that the population actually declined. Fischer also brilliantly illuminates how these long economic waves are closely intertwined with social and political events, affecting the very mindset of the people caught in them. The long periods of equilibrium are marked by cultural and intellectual movements--such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and the Victorian Age-- based on a belief in order and harmony and in the triumph of progress and reason. By contrast, the years of price revolution created a melancholy culture of despair. Fischer suggests that we are living now in the last stages of a price revolution that has been building since the turn of the century. The destabilizing price surges and declines and the diminished expectations the United States has suffered in recent years--and the famines and wars of other areas of the globe--are typical of the crest of a price revolution. He does not attempt to predict what will happen, noting that "uncertainty about the future is an inexorable fact of our condition." Rather, he ends with a brilliant analysis of where we might go from here and what our choices are now. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of the world today.

Books in Series

Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780835221092

Category: Monographic series

Page: 1756

View: 3354

The Quantifying Spirit in the 18th Century

Author: Tore Frängsmyr,J. L. Heilbron,Robin E. Rider

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520070226

Category: History

Page: 411

View: 8542

The Enlightenment Tradition

Author: Robert Anchor

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520037847

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 9871

This synoptic survey examines critically the origins, development, decline, and historical significance of the European Enlightenment. The underlying theme of the inquiry is the real and possible relevance of the Enlightenment tradition to contemporary Western society.

Europe in the eighteenth century, 1713-1783

Author: Matthew Smith Anderson

Publisher: Addison-Wesley Longman Ltd

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 539

View: 6603

The first edition of this book was hailed by the journal History as 'much the best English textbook in the field', and the third, fully revised, edition is likely to keep it so. Professor Anderson surveys all aspects of European life in the eighteenth century. As before, most of the discussion is on a continent-wide basis; the British Isles are treated as an integral part of the continent; and the book is particularly strong in the attention it devotes to the important but often neglected nations of eastern Europe. It also deals with the European colonial empires, and with the extra-European cultural influences that now affected the life the continent. Furthermore, this edition draws together all the recent important scholarship on the period.

The Invention of the Oral

Print Commerce and Fugitive Voices in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Author: Paula McDowell

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022645701X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 368

View: 1935

Just as today’s embrace of the digital has sparked interest in the history of print culture, so in eighteenth-century Britain the dramatic proliferation of print gave rise to urgent efforts to historicize different media forms and to understand their unique powers. And so it was, Paula McDowell argues, that our modern concepts of oral culture and print culture began to crystallize, and authors and intellectuals drew on older theological notion of oral tradition to forge the modern secular notion of oral tradition that we know today. Drawing on an impressive array of sources including travel narratives, elocution manuals, theological writings, ballad collections, and legal records, McDowell re-creates a world in which everyone from fishwives to philosophers, clergymen to street hucksters, competed for space and audiences in taverns, marketplaces, and the street. She argues that the earliest positive efforts to theorize "oral tradition," and to depict popular oral culture as a culture (rather than a lack of culture), were prompted less by any protodemocratic impulse than by a profound discomfort with new cultures of reading, writing, and even speaking shaped by print. Challenging traditional models of oral versus literate societies and key assumptions about culture’s ties to the spoken and the written word, this landmark study reorients critical conversations across eighteenth-century studies, media and communications studies, the history of the book, and beyond.

Aspects of European History 1494-1789

Author: Stephen J. Lee

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113497227X

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 4228

First published in 1984. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

London Lives

Author: Tim Hitchcock,Robert Shoemaker

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107025273

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 8519

Surveys the lives and experiences of hundreds of thousands of eighteenth-century non-elite Londoners in the evolution of the modern world.