Enrique's Journey

The Story of a Boy's Dangerous Odyssey to Reunite with His Mother

Author: Sonia Nazario

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 782

An astonishing story that puts a human face on the ongoing debate about immigration reform in the United States, now updated with a new Epilogue and Afterword, photos of Enrique and his family, an author interview, and more—the definitive edition of a classic of contemporary America Based on the Los Angeles Times newspaper series that won two Pulitzer Prizes, one for feature writing and another for feature photography, this page-turner about the power of family is a popular text in classrooms and a touchstone for communities across the country to engage in meaningful discussions about this essential American subject. Enrique’s Journey recounts the unforgettable quest of a Honduran boy looking for his mother, eleven years after she is forced to leave her starving family to find work in the United States. Braving unimaginable peril, often clinging to the sides and tops of freight trains, Enrique travels through hostile worlds full of thugs, bandits, and corrupt cops. But he pushes forward, relying on his wit, courage, hope, and the kindness of strangers. As Isabel Allende writes: “This is a twenty-first-century Odyssey. If you are going to read only one nonfiction book this year, it has to be this one.” Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more. “Magnificent . . . Enrique’s Journey is about love. It’s about family. It’s about home.”—The Washington Post Book World “[A] searing report from the immigration frontlines . . . as harrowing as it is heartbreaking.”—People (four stars) “Stunning . . . As an adventure narrative alone, Enrique’s Journey is a worthy read. . . . Nazario’s impressive piece of reporting [turns] the current immigration controversy from a political story into a personal one.”—Entertainment Weekly “Gripping and harrowing . . . a story begging to be told.”—The Christian Science Monitor “[A] prodigious feat of reporting . . . [Sonia Nazario is] amazingly thorough and intrepid.”—Newsday From the Trade Paperback edition.

Enrique's Journey (The Young Adult Adaptation)

The True Story of a Boy Determined to Reunite with His Mother

Author: Sonia Nazario

Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers

ISBN:

Category: Young Adult Nonfiction

Page: 288

View: 213

“A heartwrenching account. Provides a human face, both beautiful and scarred, for the undocumented. A must read."--Kirkus Reviews, Starred Adapted for young people, this edition of Enrique’s Journey is written by Sonia Nazario and based on the adult book of the same name. It is the true story of Enrique, a teenager from Honduras, who sets out on a journey, braving hardship and peril, to find his mother, who had no choice but to leave him when he was a child and go to the United States in search of work. Enrique’s story will bring to light the daily struggles of migrants, legal and otherwise, and the complicated choices they face simply trying to survive and provide for the basic needs of their families. The issues seamlessly interwoven into this gripping nonfiction work for young people are perfect for common core discussion. Includes an 8-page photo insert as well as an epilogue that describes what has happened to Enrique and his family since the adult edition was published. Enrique's Journey is also available in a Spanish language edition, translated by Ana Ras. "Nazario's straightforward . . . journalistic writing style largely serves the complex, sprawling story effectively. A valuable addition to young adult collections."—School Library Journal "This powerfully written survival story personalizes the complicated, pervasive, and heart-wrenching debates about immigration and immigrants' rights and will certainly spark discussion in the classroom and at home."—Booklist An NCSS-CBC Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People A Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book of the Year A Junior Library Guild Selection From the Hardcover edition.

Immigration

The Ultimate Teen Guide

Author: Tatyana Kleyn

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 238

View: 998

As the future of our democratic society, youth from U.S.-born and immigrant backgrounds alike will need to make informed decisions on our diverse nation's behalf. To do so, young adults need to be provided with access to accurate information and varied perspectives about immigration. In Immigration: The Ultimate Teen Guide, Tatyana Kleyn (an immigrant herself) examines the myths and realities of immigration, as well as the laws and policies that regulate it. She explores a number of issues associated with immigration, including cultural clashes and discrimination, the debate on language, undocumented immigrants, and what it means to be an American. The book includes an overview of the nation's history with immigration, definitions of relevant terms, and recent statistical and demographic information. It also discusses why and how many immigrants make the journey to the United States. Other aspects the book addresses include undocumented immigrants and refugees/asylees, laws and policies that either support or hinder immigration, and how young immigrants can reconcile their competing identities. Aiming to generate a discussion on immigration with factual and contemporary information, real life stories, experiences, and quotes from teenagers and young adults, Immigration: The Ultimate Teen Guide presents a comprehensive and engaging approach to informing readers about the varied ways immigration is experienced, viewed, and disputed.

Handbook of Latinos and Education

Theory, Research, and Practice

Author: Enrique G. Murillo Jr.

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 670

View: 453

Providing a comprehensive review of rigorous, innovative, and critical scholarship relevant to educational issues which impact Latinos, this Handbook captures the field at this point in time. Its unique purpose and function is to profile the scope and terrain of academic inquiry on Latinos and education. Presenting the most significant and potentially influential work in the field in terms of its contributions to research, to professional practice, and to the emergence of related interdisciplinary studies and theory, the volume is organized around five themes: history, theory, and methodology policies and politics language and culture teaching and learning resources and information. The Handbook of Latinos and Education is a must-have resource for educational researchers, graduate students, teacher educators, and the broad spectrum of individuals, groups, agencies, organizations and institutions sharing a common interest in and commitment to the educational issues that impact Latinos.

Global Health Nursing

Narratives From the Field

Author: Christina A. Harlan, MA, RN

Publisher: Springer Publishing Company

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 344

View: 587

"The narratives in this book offer rare and much-needed insight into the lived experiences and contributions of the largest cadre of global health workers: The nurses who have dedicated their careers and their lives to serving the world's poor." --Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, Kolokotrones University Professor Harvard University; Co-Founder, Partners in Health Global health nursing--as a career or as a time-limited experience in personal and professional growth--is a rapidly growing specialty area. This unique book presents firsthand accounts from nurses at all professional levels, who share their life-changing experiences and insights with nurses interested in the global health arena. Written with compassion and humor, their stories emphasize the practical, challenging, and rewarding aspects of global health nursing. Contributors describe their motivation for working in global health, along with the rewards and challenges. The authors discuss the importance of approaching global nursing with humility, respect, and appreciation for what they will learn from their colleagues. They describe how global health work has enhanced their ability to provide quality care to diverse populations, which include recent immigrants living in the United States. In addition to these vivid accounts, the book discusses the parameters of global health nursing, how to prepare for this nursing experience, key resources, global nursing research, and nurses as global health consultants. Woven throughout the book are descriptions of how these nurses have encouraged--through teaching and mentoring--the next generation of global health nurses. The book also provides coverage of domestic global health initiatives. Key Features: Presents firsthand accounts of the practical, challenging, and rewarding aspects of global health nursing Describes assumptions challenged and lessons learned Written for nurses at all stages of professional life Discusses varied opportunities in global health nursing, which includes research and consulting Covers domestic global health initiatives Assists faculty to prepare themselves and their students for global health endeavors

Latining America

Black-Brown Passages and the Coloring of Latino/a Studies

Author: Claudia Milian

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 752

With Latining America, Claudia Milian proposes that the economies of blackness, brownness, and dark brownness summon a new grammar for Latino/a studies that she names “Latinities.” Milian’s innovative study argues that this ensnared economy of meaning startles the typical reading practices deployed for brown Latino/a embodiment. Latining America keeps company with and challenges existent models of Latinidad, demanding a distinct paradigm that puts into question what is understood as Latino and Latina today. Milian conceptually considers how underexplored “Latin” participants––the southern, the black, the dark brown, the Central American—have ushered in a new world of “Latined” signification from the 1920s to the present. Examining not who but what constitutes the Latino and Latina, Milian’s new critical Latinities disentangle the brown logic that marks “Latino/a” subjects. She expands on and deepens insights in transamerican discourses, narratives of passing, popular culture, and contemporary art. This daring and original project uncovers previously ignored and unremarked upon cultural connections and global crossings whereby African Americans and Latinos traverse and reconfigure their racialized classifications.

Opening the Floodgates

Why America Needs to Rethink its Borders and Immigration Laws

Author: Kevin R. Johnson

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 289

View: 436

Seeking to re-imagine the meaning and significance of the international border, Opening the Floodgates makes a case for eliminating the border as a legal construct that impedes the movement of people into this country. Open migration policies deserve fuller analysis, as evidenced by President Barack Obama’s pledge to make immigration reform a priority. Kevin R. Johnson offers an alternative vision of how U.S. borders might be reconfigured, grounded in moral, economic, and policy arguments for open borders. Importantly, liberalizing migration through an open borders policy would recognize that the enforcement of closed borders cannot stifle the strong, perhaps irresistible, economic, social, and political pressures that fuel international migration. Controversially, Johnson suggests that open borders are entirely consistent with efforts to prevent terrorism that have dominated immigration enforcement since the events of September 11, 2001. More liberal migration, he suggests, would allow for full attention to be paid to the true dangers to public safety and national security.

Showdown in the Sonoran Desert

Religion, Law, and the Immigration Controversy

Author: Ananda Rose

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 340

This book offers reflections on a daunting and controversial ethical question: How should we treat the strangers who enter this country illegally? To understand the experience of those directly confronted by this problem, Ananda Rose traveled to the Sonoran desert at the border between the U.S. and Mexico. There she gathered opinions from Minutemen, Border Patrol agents, Catholic nuns, humanitarian air workers, left-wing protestors, ranchers, and other ordinary citizens in southern Arizona. She depicts the results of these interviews as two starkly opposed ideological perspectives: that of religious activists who embrace a biblically-inspired model of hospitality that stresses love of strangers and a "borderless" compassion; and that of law enforcement, which is concerned with safety, security, and strict respect for international borders.

Migration as a Matter of Time

Perspectives from Mexican Immigrant Adolescent Girls in California's Napa Valley

Author: Lilia Soto

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 488

View: 996