Educating Physicians

A Call for Reform of Medical School and Residency

Author: Molly Cooke

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 320

View: 786

Praise for Educating Physicians "Educating Physicians provides a masterful analysis of undergraduate and graduate medical education in the United States today. It represents a major educational document, based firmly on educational psychology, learning theory, empirical studies, and careful personal observations of many individual programs. It also recognizes the importance of financing, regulation, and institutional culture on the learning environment, which suffuses its recommendations for reform with cogency and power. Most important, like Abraham Flexner's classic study a century ago, the report recognizes that medical education and practice, at their core, are profoundly moral enterprises. This is a landmark volume that merits attention from anyone even peripherally involved with medical education." —Kenneth M. Ludmerer, author, Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care "This is a very important book that comes at a critical time in our nation's history. We will not have enduring health care reform in this country unless we rethink our medical education paradigms. This book is a call to arms for doing just that." —George E. Thibault, president, Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation "The authors provide us with the evidence-based model for physician education with associated changes in infrastructure, policy, and our roles as educators. Whether you agree or not with their conclusions, if you are a teacher this book is a must-read as it will frame both what and how we discuss medical education throughout the current century." —Deborah Simpson, associate dean for educational support and evaluation, Medical College of Wisconsin "A provocative book that provides us with a creative vision for medical education. Using in-depth case studies of innovative educational practices illustrating what is actually possible, the authors provide sage advice for transforming medical education on the basis of learning theories and educational research." —Judith L. Bowen, professor of medicine, Oregon Health & Science University

Educating Physicians Responsible for Poor Medical Care

A Review of the Peer Review Organizations' Efforts

Author: United States. Department of Health and Human Services. Office of Inspector General

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Medicare

Page: 60

View: 680

The Digital Patient

Advancing Healthcare, Research, and Education

Author: C. D. Combs

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 336

View: 217

A modern guide to computational models and constructive simulation for personalized patient care using the Digital Patient The healthcare industry’s emphasis is shifting from merely reacting to disease to preventing disease and promoting wellness. Addressing one of the more hopeful Big Data undertakings, The Digital Patient: Advancing Healthcare, Research, and Education presents a timely resource on the construction and deployment of the Digital Patient and its effects on healthcare, research, and education. The Digital Patient will not be constructed based solely on new information from all the “omics” fields; it also includes systems analysis, Big Data, and the various efforts to model the human physiome and represent it virtually. The Digital Patient will be realized through the purposeful collaboration of patients as well as scientific, clinical, and policy researchers. The Digital Patient: Advancing Healthcare, Research, and Education addresses the international research efforts that are leading to the development of the Digital Patient, the wealth of ongoing research in systems biology and multiscale simulation, and the imminent applications within the domain of personalized healthcare. Chapter coverage includes: The visible human The physiological human The virtual human Research in systems biology Multi-scale modeling Personalized medicine Self-quantification Visualization Computational modeling Interdisciplinary collaboration The Digital Patient: Advancing Healthcare, Research, and Education is a useful reference for simulation professionals such as clinicians, medical directors, managers, simulation technologists, faculty members, and educators involved in research and development in the life sciences, physical sciences, and engineering. The book is also an ideal supplement for graduate-level courses related to human modeling, simulation, and visualization.

Educating For Professionalism

Creating A Culture Of Humanism In Medical Education

Author: Delese Wear

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 236

View: 179

The thirteen essays in Educating for Professionalism examine the often conflicting ethical, social, emotional, and intellectual messages that medical institutions send to students about what it means to be a doctor. Because this disconnection between what medical educators profess and what students experience is partly to blame for the current crisis in medical professionalism, the authors offer timely, reflective analyses of the work and opportunities facing medical education if doctors are to win public trust. In their drive to improve medical professionalism within the world of academic medicine, editors Delese Wear and Janet Bickel have assembled thought-provoking essays that elucidate the many facets of teaching, valuing, and maintaining medical professionalism in the middle of the myriad challenges facing medicine at the dawn of the twenty-first century. The collection traces how the values of altruism and service can influence not only mission statements and admission policies but also the content of medical school ethics courses, student-led task forces, and mentoring programs, along with larger environmental issues in medical schools and the communities they serve. Contributors: Stanley Joel Reiser Jack Coulehan Peter C. Williams Frederic W. Hafferty Richard Martinez Judith Andre Jake Foglio Howard Brody Sheila Woods Sue Fosson Lois Margaret Nora Mary Anne C. Johnston Tana A. Grady-Weliky Cynthia N. Kettyle Edward M. Hundert Norma E. Wagoner Frederick A. Miller William D. Mellon Howard Waitzkin Donald Wasylenki Niall Byrne Barbara McRobb Edward J. Eckenfels Lucy Wolf Tuton Claudia H. Siegel Timothy B. Campbell

Educating Physicians for Rural America: Validating Successes and Identifying Remaining Challenges With the Rural Medical Scholars Program

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 591

Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the Rural Medical Scholars (RMS) Program's effectiveness to produce rural physicians for Alabama. Methods: A nonrandomized intervention study compared RMS (1997‐2002) with control groups in usual medical education (1991‐2002) at the University of Alabama School of Medicine's main and regional campuses. Participants were RMS and others admitted to regular medical education, and the intervention was the RMS Program. Measures assessed the percentage of graduates practicing in rural areas. Odds ratios compared effectiveness of producing rural Alabama physicians. Findings: The RMS Program (N = 54), regional campuses (N = 182), and main campus (N = 649) produced 48.1% (odds ratio 6.4, P

Physician Compensation Plans

State-Of-The-Art Strategies

Author: Bruce A. Johnson

Publisher: Medical Group Management Assn

ISBN:

Category: Managed care plans (Medical care)

Page: 566

View: 545

Navigating the maze of methods by which income for physicians is determined and paid in a wide variety of health care organizations, this step-by-step guide covers plan development and information on pay-for-performance programs, implementation methods, and more.

Catching Babies

The Professionalization of Childbirth, 1870-1920

Author: Charlotte G. Borst

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 590

Childbirth is a quintessential family event that simultaneously holds great promise and runs the risk of danger. By the late nineteenth century, the birthing room had become a place where the goals of the new scientific professional could be demonstrated, but where traditional female knowledge was in conflict with the new ways. Here the choice of attendants and their practices defined gender, ethnicity, class, and the role of the professional. Using the methodology of social science theory, particularly quantitative statistical analysis and historical demography, Charlotte Borst examines the effect of gender, culture, and class on the transition to physician-attended childbirth. Earlier studies have focused on physician opposition to midwifery, devoting little attention to the training for and actual practice of midwifery. As a result, until now we knew little about the actual conditions of the midwife's education and practice. Catching Babies is the first study to examine the move to physician-attended birth within the context of a particular community. It focuses on four representative counties in Wisconsin to study both midwives and physicians within the context of their community. Borst finds that midwives were not pushed out of practice by elitist or misogynist obstetricians. Instead, their traditional, artisanal skills ceased to be valued by a society that had come to embrace the model of disinterested, professional science. The community that had previously hired midwives turned to physicians who shared ethnic and cultural values with the very midwives they replaced.