Early Modern Europe

An Oxford History

Author: Euan Cameron

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191606812

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 8927

'Early Modern' is a term applied to the period which falls between the end of the middle ages and the beginning of the nineteenth century. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to Europe in this period, exploring the changes and transitions involved in the move towards modernity. Nine newly commissioned chapters under the careful editorship of Euan Cameron cover social, political, economic, and cultural perspectives, all contributing to a full and vibrant picture of Europe during this time. The chapters are organized thematically, and consider the evolving European economy and society, the impact of new ideas on religion, and the emergence of modern political attitudes and techniques. The text is complemented with many illustrations throughout to give a feel of the changes in life beyond the raw historical data.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750

Volume I: Peoples and Place

Author: Hamish Scott

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191015334

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 993

This Handbook re-examines the concept of early modern history in a European and global context. The term 'early modern' has been familiar, especially in Anglophone scholarship, for four decades and is securely established in teaching, research, and scholarly publishing. More recently, however, the unity implied in the notion has fragmented, while the usefulness and even the validity of the term, and the historical periodisation which it incorporates, have been questioned. The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750 provides an account of the development of the subject during the past half-century, but primarily offers an integrated and comprehensive survey of present knowledge, together with some suggestions as to how the field is developing. It aims both to interrogate the notion of 'early modernity' itself and to survey early modern Europe as an established field of study. The overriding aim will be to establish that 'early modern' is not simply a chronological label but possesses a substantive integrity. Volume I examines 'Peoples and Place', assessing structural factors such as climate, printing and the revolution in information, social and economic developments, and religion, including chapters on Orthodoxy, Judaism and Islam.

Early Modern Europe, 1450-1789

Author: Merry E. Wiesner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107031060

Category: History

Page: 563

View: 2027

"The title of this book, and perhaps also of the course for which you are reading it, is Early Modern Europe. The dates in the title inform you about the chronological span covered (1450-1789), but they do not explain the designation "early modern." Thatterm was developed by historians seeking to refine an intellectual model first devised during this very period, when scholars divided European history into three parts: ancient (to the end of the Roman Empire in the west in the fifth century), medieval (from the fifth century to the fifteenth), and modern (from the fifteenth century to their own time). In this model, the break between the Middle Ages and the modern era was marked by the first voyage of Columbus (1492) and the beginning of the Protestant Reformation (1517), though some scholars, especially those who focused on Italy, set the break somewhat earlier with the Italian Renaissance. This three-part periodization became extremely influential, and as the modern era grew longer and longer, historians began to divide it into "early modern" - from the Renaissance or Columbus to the French Revolution in 1789 - and what we might call "truly modern" - from the French Revolution to whenever they happened to be writing"--

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750

Author: Hamish M. Scott

Publisher: Oxford Handbooks

ISBN: 019959726X

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 5889

This Handbook re-examines the concept of early modern history in a European and global context. The term "early modern" has been familiar, especially in Anglophone scholarship, for four decades and is securely established in teaching, research, and scholarly publishing. More recently, however,the unity implied in the notion has fragmented, while the usefulness and even the validity of the term, and the historical periodisation which it incorporates, have been questioned. The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750 provides an account of the development of the subjectduring the past half-century, but primarily offers an integrated and comprehensive survey of present knowledge, together with some suggestions as to how the field is developing. It aims both to interrogate the notion of "early modernity" itself and to survey early modern Europe as an establishedfield of study. The overriding aim will be to establish that "early modern" is not simply a chronological label but possesses a substantive integrity.Volume II is devoted to "Cultures and Power", opening with chapters on philosophy, science, art and architecture, music, and the Enlightenment. Subsequent sections examine 'Europe beyond Europe', with the transformation of contact with other continents during the first global age, and military andpolitical developments, notably the expansion of state power.

Violence in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800

Author: Julius R. Ruff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521598941

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 9681

A survey of violence in western Europe from the Reformation to the French Revolution.

The European World 1500–1800

An Introduction to Early Modern History

Author: Beat Kümin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351394126

Category: History

Page: 442

View: 5568

The European World 1500-1800 provides a concise and authoritative textbook for the centuries between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. It presents early modern Europe not as a mere transition phase, but a dynamic period worth studying in its own right. Written by an experienced team of specialists, and derived from a successful undergraduate course, it offers a student-friendly introduction to all major themes and processes of early modern history. This third edition features greatly expanded coverage of ‘The Wider World’, with added chapters on relations with the Ottoman empire, European settlement overseas and the global exchange of goods. Other new content includes an overview of early modern medicine and comprehensive timelines for each of the?thematic parts. Specially designed to assist learning, The European World 1500-1800 features: expert surveys of key topics written by an international group of historians suggestions for seminar discussion and further reading extracts from primary sources and generous illustrations, including maps a glossary of key terms and concepts a full index of persons, places and subjects and a much enhanced companion website, offering colour images, direct access to primary materials, and interactive features which highlight key events and locations discussed in the volume. The European World 1500-1800 will be essential reading for all students embarking on the discovery of the early modern period. ?

The Sixteenth Century

Author: Euan K. Cameron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198731884

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 6010

This new volume in the Short Oxford History of Europe series looks at the sixteenth century - one of the most tumultuous and dramatic periods of social and cultural transformation in European history. Six leading experts consider this period from a variety of perspectives, including political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual history, and subject traditional explanations of all these areas to revision in light of the most modern scholarship. - ;The sixteenth century witnessed some of the most abrupt and traumatic transformations ever seen in European society and culture. Populatio.

Memory in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800

Author: Judith Pollmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0192518151

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 2982

For early modern Europeans, the past was a measure of most things, good and bad. For that reason it was also hotly contested, manipulated, and far too important to be left to historians alone. Memory in Early Modern Europe offers a lively and accessible introduction to the many ways in which Europeans engaged with the past and 'practised' memory in the three centuries between 1500 and 1800. From childhood memories and local customs to war traumas and peacekeeping , it analyses how Europeans tried to control, mobilize and reconfigure memories of the past. Challenging the long-standing view that memory cultures transformed around 1800, it argues for the continued relevance of early modern memory practices in modern societies.

Evening's Empire

A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe

Author: Craig Koslofsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521896436

Category: History

Page: 431

View: 3661

This illuminating guide to the night opens up an entirely new vista on early modern Europe. Using diaries, letters, legal records and representations of the night in early modern religion, literature and art, Craig Koslofsky explores the myriad ways in which early modern people understood, experienced and transformed the night.

The Oxford Illustrated History of Modern Europe

Author: T. C. W. Blanning

Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks

ISBN: 9780192854261

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 6057

'a superb volume, complete with maps, and tells the story of a continent from the 18th century to the present day.' -Irish Times

Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Author: Merry E. Wiesner

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521778220

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 4543

A major new edition of the bestselling volume in New Approaches to European History.

Thinking with Demons

The Idea of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

Author: Stuart Clark

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198208082

Category: History

Page: 827

View: 9674

This is a work of fundamental importance for our understanding of the intellectual and cultural history of early modern Europe. Stuart Clark offers a new interpretation of the witchcraft beliefs of European intellectuals between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries, based on their publications in the field of demonology. He shows how these beliefs fitted rationally with other views current in Europe throughout that period, and underlines just how far the nature of rationality is dependent on its historical context.

The European Reformation

Author: Euan Cameron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199547858

Category: History

Page: 616

View: 1020

Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-writtenand updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original, including its clearly thought-outintegration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use.

The Russian Empire 1450-1801

Author: Nancy Shields Kollmann

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199280517

Category:

Page: 496

View: 7595

Modern Russian identity and historical experience has been largely shaped by Russia's imperial past: an empire that was founded in the early modern era and endures in large part today. The Russian Empire 1450-1801 surveys how the areas that made up the empire were conquered and how they were governed. It considers the Russian empire a 'Eurasian empire', characterized by a 'politics of difference': the rulers and their elites at the center defined the state's needs minimally - with control over defense, criminal law, taxation, and mobilization of resources - and otherwise tolerated local religions, languages, cultures, elites, and institutions. The center related to communities and religions vertically, according each a modicum of rights and autonomies, but didn't allow horizontal connections across nobilities, townsmen, or other groups potentially with common interests to coalesce. Thus, the Russian empire was multi-ethnic and multi-religious; Nancy Kollmann gives detailed attention to the major ethnic and religious groups, and surveys the government's strategies of governance - centralized bureaucracy, military reform, and a changed judicial system. The volume pays particular attention to the dissemination of a supranational ideology of political legitimacy in a variety of media - written sources and primarily public ritual, painting, and particularly architecture. Beginning with foundational features, such as geography, climate, demography, and geopolitical situation, The Russian Empire 1450-1801 explores the empire's primarily agrarian economy, serfdom, towns and trade, as well as the many religious groups - primarily Orthodoxy, Islam, and Buddhism. It tracks the emergence of an 'Imperial nobility' and a national self-consciousness that was, by the end of the eighteenth century, distinctly imperial, embracing the diversity of the empire's many peoples and cultures.

The European Dynastic States

1494-1660

Author: Richard Bonney

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780198730231

Category: Architecture

Page: 658

View: 2916

This is a study of Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries--a period of economic and cultural upheaval, of dramatic changes in politics, society, and religion, and of constant warring among the emergent states. Based on extensive research, this book covers such diverse themes as the Reformation, witchcraft, diplomacy, population structure, the growth of capitalism, wars of religion, and wars of expansion. Bonney also examines the Scandinavian countries and Russia, areas frequently neglected by historians.

The Lights that Failed

European International History, 1919-1933

Author: Zara S. Steiner

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199226865

Category: History

Page: 938

View: 8951

Challenging the common assumption that the Treaty of Versailles led to the opening of a second European war, this book provides an analysis of the attempts to reconstruct Europe during the 1920s. It examines the efforts that failed but also those which gave hope for future promise that are usually underestimated, if not ignored.

The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191648841

Category: History

Page: 646

View: 8387

The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.

War in European History

Author: Michael Howard

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199546193

Category: History

Page: 171

View: 1881

A new edition of this brilliantly written survey of the changing ways that war has been waged in Europe, from the Norse invasions to the present day, Michael Howard illuminates the way in which warfare has shaped the history of the Continent, its effect on social and political institutions, and the ways in which technological and social change have in turn shaped the way in which wars are fought. This new edition includes a fully updated further reading and a newchapter bringing the story into the twenty-first century, including the invasion of Iraq and the so-called 'War against Terror'.

Divided Kingdom

Ireland 1630-1800

Author: S. J. Connolly

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191562432

Category: History

Page: 544

View: 8386

For Ireland the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries were an era marked by war, economic transformation, and the making and remaking of identities. By the 1630s the era of wars of conquest seemed firmly in the past. But the British civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century fractured both Protestant and Catholic Ireland along lines defined by different combinations of religious and political allegiance. Later, after 1688, Ireland became the battlefield for what was otherwise Britain's bloodless (and so Glorious) Revolution. The eighteenth century, by contrast, was a period of peace, permitting Ireland to emerge, first as a dynamic actor in the growing Atlantic economy, then as the breadbasket for industrialising Britain. But at the end of the century, against a background of international revolution, new forms of religious and political conflict came together to produce another period of multi-sided conflict. The Act of Union, hastily introduced in the aftermath of civil war, ensured that Ireland entered the nineteenth century still divided, but no longer a kingdom.

The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945

Author: Nicholas Doumanis,Senior Lecturer in World History Nicholas Doumanis, Dr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199695660

Category: Europe

Page: 672

View: 687

The period spanning the two World Wars was unquestionably the most catastrophic in Europe's history. Historians have been drawn to its exceptionally dramatic and harrowing events, as bookshops continue to stock new studies on Hitler, Stalin, Churchill, the Holocaust, and the battles of the two World Wars with monotonous regularity. There is a deeper need, however, to explain why Europe experienced so many conflicts, revolutions, coup d'états, and civil wars within such a short space of time? Why did much of Europe succumb to authoritarian rule and why did political violence become so endemic? Why was mass politics followed by mass murder? Why did Europe experience a 'Thirty Years' War'? Another challenge is to explain the diversity of experiences: why some European societies were not traumatized by war and invasion, why liberal democracy survived throughout north-western Europe, why general living standards continued to rise, and why the status of women continued to improve. The Oxford Handbook of European History 1914-1945 looks afresh at this troubled and complicated age. It does so by taking comparative and transnational approaches rather than merely focusing on individual national experiences. Its features a collection of distinguished historians who explain the patterns of change and continuity that applied generally, while at the same time accounting for various regional and local articulations. Among the themes covered are political economy, international relations, genocide, colonialism, gender, sexuality, human rights, welfare, rural politics, labour and youth, as well as the era's more distinctive features, such as fascism, Stalinism, the Great Depression, trench warfare and the ethnic cleansing. The Handbook serves as a guide for revising the 1914-1945 era, and for how to write histories that take the whole Europe as their subject and not merely its constituent parts: histories of Europe rather than merely in Europe.