Early Modern Europe

An Oxford History

Author: Euan Cameron

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191606812

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 5089

'Early Modern' is a term applied to the period which falls between the end of the middle ages and the beginning of the nineteenth century. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to Europe in this period, exploring the changes and transitions involved in the move towards modernity. Nine newly commissioned chapters under the careful editorship of Euan Cameron cover social, political, economic, and cultural perspectives, all contributing to a full and vibrant picture of Europe during this time. The chapters are organized thematically, and consider the evolving European economy and society, the impact of new ideas on religion, and the emergence of modern political attitudes and techniques. The text is complemented with many illustrations throughout to give a feel of the changes in life beyond the raw historical data.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750

Volume I: Peoples and Place

Author: Hamish Scott

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191015334

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 1077

This Handbook re-examines the concept of early modern history in a European and global context. The term 'early modern' has been familiar, especially in Anglophone scholarship, for four decades and is securely established in teaching, research, and scholarly publishing. More recently, however, the unity implied in the notion has fragmented, while the usefulness and even the validity of the term, and the historical periodisation which it incorporates, have been questioned. The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750 provides an account of the development of the subject during the past half-century, but primarily offers an integrated and comprehensive survey of present knowledge, together with some suggestions as to how the field is developing. It aims both to interrogate the notion of 'early modernity' itself and to survey early modern Europe as an established field of study. The overriding aim will be to establish that 'early modern' is not simply a chronological label but possesses a substantive integrity. Volume I examines 'Peoples and Place', assessing structural factors such as climate, printing and the revolution in information, social and economic developments, and religion, including chapters on Orthodoxy, Judaism and Islam.

The European Reformation

Author: Euan Cameron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199547858

Category: History

Page: 616

View: 689

Since its first appearance in 1991, The European Reformation has offered a clear, integrated and coherent analysis and explanation of how Christianity in Western and Central Europe from Iceland to Hungary, from the Baltic to the Pyrenees splintered into separate Protestant and Catholic identities and movements. This new edition embraces and responds to developments in scholarship over the past twenty years. Substantially re-writtenand updated, with both a thorough revision of the text and fully updated references and bibliography, it nevertheless preserves the distinctive features of the original, including its clearly thought-outintegration of theological ideas and political cultures, helping to bridge the gap between theological and social history, and the use of helpful charts and tables that made the original so easy to use.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750

Author: Hamish M. Scott

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199597251

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 4398

This Handbook re-examines the concept of early modern history in a European and global context. The term 'early modern' has been familiar, especially in Anglophone scholarship, for four decades and is securely established in teaching, research, and scholarly publishing. More recently, however, the unity implied in the notion has fragmented, while the usefulness and even the validity of the term, and the historical periodisation which it incorporates, have been questioned. The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750 provides an account of the development of the subject during the past half-century, but primarily offers an integrated and comprehensive survey of present knowledge, together with some suggestions as to how the field is developing. It aims both to interrogate the notion of 'early modernity' itself and to survey early modern Europe as an established field of study. The overriding aim will be to establish that 'early modern' is not simply a chronological label but possesses a substantive integrity. Volume I examines 'Peoples and Place', assessing structural factors such as climate, printing and the revolution in information, social and economic developments, and religion, including chapters on Orthodoxy, Judaism and Islam.

The Sixteenth Century

Author: Euan K. Cameron

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198731884

Category: History

Page: 276

View: 7462

This new volume in the Short Oxford History of Europe series looks at the sixteenth century - one of the most tumultuous and dramatic periods of social and cultural transformation in European history. Six leading experts consider this period from a variety of perspectives, including political, social, economic, religious, and intellectual history, and subject traditional explanations of all these areas to revision in light of the most modern scholarship. - ;The sixteenth century witnessed some of the most abrupt and traumatic transformations ever seen in European society and culture. Populatio.

The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750

Author: Hamish M. Scott

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0199597251

Category: History

Page: 736

View: 3870

This Handbook re-examines the concept of early modern history in a European and global context. The term 'early modern' has been familiar, especially in Anglophone scholarship, for four decades and is securely established in teaching, research, and scholarly publishing. More recently, however, the unity implied in the notion has fragmented, while the usefulness and even the validity of the term, and the historical periodisation which it incorporates, have been questioned. The Oxford Handbook of Early Modern European History, 1350-1750 provides an account of the development of the subject during the past half-century, but primarily offers an integrated and comprehensive survey of present knowledge, together with some suggestions as to how the field is developing. It aims both to interrogate the notion of 'early modernity' itself and to survey early modern Europe as an established field of study. The overriding aim will be to establish that 'early modern' is not simply a chronological label but possesses a substantive integrity. Volume I examines 'Peoples and Place', assessing structural factors such as climate, printing and the revolution in information, social and economic developments, and religion, including chapters on Orthodoxy, Judaism and Islam.

Defining the Holy

Sacred Space in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Author: Sarah Hamilton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351945610

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 1081

Holy sites, both public - churches, monasteries, shrines - and more private - domestic chapels, oratories - populated the landscape of medieval and early modern Europe, providing contemporaries with access to the divine. These sacred spaces thus defined religious experience, and were fundamental to both the geography and social history of Europe over the course of 1,000 years. But how were these sacred spaces, both public and private, defined? How were they created, used, recognised and transformed? And to what extent did these definitions change over the course of time, and in particular as a result of the changes wrought in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Taking a strongly interdisciplinary approach, this volume tackles these questions from the point of view of archaeology, architectural and art history, liturgy, and history to consider the fundamental interaction between the sacred and the profane. Exploring the establishment of sacred space within both the public and domestic spheres, as well as the role of the secular within the sacred sphere, each chapter provides fascinating insights into how these concepts helped shape, and were shaped by, wider society. By highlighting these issues on a European basis from the medieval period through the age of the reformations, these essays demonstrate the significance of continuity as much as change in definitions of sacred space, and thus identify long term trends which have hitherto been absent in more limited studies. As such this volume provides essential reading for anyone with an interest in the ecclesiastical development of western Europe from the thirteenth to the eighteenth centuries.

Vanities of the Eye

Vision in Early Modern European Culture

Author: Stuart Clark

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199250134

Category: Art

Page: 415

View: 3836

In this original and fascinating book, Stuart Clark investigates the cultural history of the senses in early modern Europe. At a time in which the nature and reliability of human vision was a focus for debate in medicine, art theory, science, and philosophy, there was an explosion of interest in the truth (or otherwise) of miracles, dreams, magic, and witchcraft. Was seeing really believing? Vanities of the Eye wonderfully illustrates how this was woven into contemporary works such as Macbeth - deeply concerned with the dangers of visual illusion - and exposes early modern theories on the relationship between the real and the virtual.

The Oxford Handbook of Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and Colonial America

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191648841

Category: History

Page: 646

View: 5367

The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.

Borders and Travellers in Early Modern Europe

Author: Thomas Betteridge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351954911

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 855

Early modern Europe was obsessed with borders and travel. It found, imagined and manufactured new borders for its travellers to cross. It celebrated and feared borders as places or states where meanings were charged and changed. In early modern Europe crossing a border could take many forms; sailing to the Americas, visiting a hospital or taking a trip through London's sewage system. Borders were places that people lived on, through and against. Some were temporary, like illness, while others claimed to be absolute, like that between the civilized world and the savage, but, as the chapters in this volume show, to cross any of them was an exciting, anxious and often a potentially dangerous act. Providing a trans-European interdisciplinary approach, the collection focuses on three particular aspects of travel and borders: change, status and function. To travel was to change, not only humans but texts, words, goods and money were all in motion at this time, having a profound influence on cultures, societies and individuals within Europe and beyond. Likewise, status was not a fixed commodity and the meaning and appearance of borders varied and could simultaneously be regarded as hostile and welcoming, restrictive and opportunistic, according to one's personal viewpoint. The volume also emphasizes the fact that borders always serve multiple functions, empowering and oppressing, protecting and threatening in equal measure. By using these three concepts as measures by which to explore a variety of subjects, Borders and Travellers in Early Modern Europe provides a fascinating new perspective from which to re-assess the way in which early modern Europeans viewed themselves, their neighbours and the wider world with which they were increasingly interacting.

Lutheran Churches in Early Modern Europe

Author: Andrew Spicer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351921169

Category: Architecture

Page: 536

View: 6006

Until recently the impact of the Lutheran Reformation has been largely regarded in political and socio-economic terms, yet for most people it was not the abstract theological debates that had the greatest impact upon their lives, but what they saw in their parish churches every Sunday. This collection of essays provides a coherent and interdisciplinary investigation of the impact that the Lutheran Reformation had on the appearance, architecture and arrangement of early modern churches. Drawing upon recent research being undertaken by leading art historians and historians on Lutheran places of worship, the volume emphasises often surprising levels of continuity, reflecting the survival of Catholic fixtures, fittings and altarpieces, and exploring how these could be remodelled in order to conform with the tenets of Lutheran belief. The volume not only addresses Lutheran art but also the way in which the architecture of their churches reflected the importance of preaching and the administration of the sacraments. Furthermore the collection is committed to extending these discussions beyond a purely German context, and to look at churches not only within the Holy Roman Empire, but also in Scandinavia, the Baltic States as well as towns dominated by Saxon communities in areas such as in Hungary and Transylvania. By focusing on ecclesiastical 'material culture' the collection helps to place the art and architecture of Lutheran places of worship into the historical, political and theological context of early modern Europe.

Die dunkle Seite der Nationalstaaten

»Ethnische Säuberungen« im modernen Europa

Author: Philipp Ther

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN: 3647368067

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9244

»Ethnische Säuberungen« wurden nicht nur von Diktatoren, sondern auch von demokratisch gewählten Politikern veranlasst. Sie sind vor allem eine Folge des modernen Nationalismus und der Nationalstaatsbildung im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert. Dieses Buch bietet grundlegende Einsichten in eines der dunkelsten Kapitel des modernen Europa. Es befasst sich mit den Voraussetzungen »ethnischer Säuberungen« ebenso wie mit den Perioden und den verantwortlichen Akteuren von Flucht, Vertreibung, Zwangsaussiedlung und Deportation. Dabei beschränkt es sich nicht auf Osteuropa, sondern beleuchtet auch die Rolle der westlichen Großmächte. Der Autor spannt einen weiten thematischen Bogen von den Balkankriegen am Vorabend des Ersten Weltkriegs über die »ethnischen Säuberungen« während und infolge des Zweiten Weltkrieges bis zu den Bürgerkriegen im ehemaligen Jugoslawien und im Kaukasus der 1990er Jahre.

The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe

Author: Desmond M. Clarke,Catherine Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 019955613X

Category: History

Page: 595

View: 4024

A team of leading scholars survey the development of philosophy in the period of extraordinary intellectual change from the mid-16th century to the early 18th century. They cover metaphysics and natural philosophy; the mind, the passions, and aesthetics; epistemology, logic, mathematics, and language; ethics and political philosophy; and religion.

Early Modern Europe

From Crisis to Stability

Author: Philip Benedict,Myron P. Gutmann

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN: 9780874139068

Category: History

Page: 318

View: 8103

Fifty years after the beginning of the debate about the "general crisis of the seventeenth century," and thirty years after theodore K. Rabb's reformulation of it as the "European struggle for stability." this volume returns to the fundamental questions raised by the long-running discussion: What continent-wide patterns of change can be discerned in European history across the centuries from the Renaissance to the French Revolution? What were the causes of the revolts that rocked so many countries between 1640 and 1660? Did fundamental changes occur in the relationship between politics and religion? Politics and military technology? Politics and the structures of intellectual authority?

Evening's Empire

A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe

Author: Craig Koslofsky

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521896436

Category: History

Page: 431

View: 3836

This illuminating guide to the night opens up an entirely new vista on early modern Europe. Using diaries, letters, legal records and representations of the night in early modern religion, literature and art, Craig Koslofsky explores the myriad ways in which early modern people understood, experienced and transformed the night.

Violence in Early Modern Europe 1500-1800

Author: Julius R. Ruff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521598941

Category: History

Page: 269

View: 9959

A survey of violence in western Europe from the Reformation to the French Revolution.

The Oxford Handbook of European History, 1914-1945

Author: Nicholas Doumanis,Senior Lecturer in World History Nicholas Doumanis, Dr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199695660

Category: Europe

Page: 672

View: 8331

The period spanning the two World Wars was unquestionably the most catastrophic in Europe's history. Historians have been drawn to its exceptionally dramatic and harrowing events, as bookshops continue to stock new studies on Hitler, Stalin, Churchill, the Holocaust, and the battles of the two World Wars with monotonous regularity. There is a deeper need, however, to explain why Europe experienced so many conflicts, revolutions, coup d'états, and civil wars within such a short space of time? Why did much of Europe succumb to authoritarian rule and why did political violence become so endemic? Why was mass politics followed by mass murder? Why did Europe experience a 'Thirty Years' War'? Another challenge is to explain the diversity of experiences: why some European societies were not traumatized by war and invasion, why liberal democracy survived throughout north-western Europe, why general living standards continued to rise, and why the status of women continued to improve. The Oxford Handbook of European History 1914-1945 looks afresh at this troubled and complicated age. It does so by taking comparative and transnational approaches rather than merely focusing on individual national experiences. Its features a collection of distinguished historians who explain the patterns of change and continuity that applied generally, while at the same time accounting for various regional and local articulations. Among the themes covered are political economy, international relations, genocide, colonialism, gender, sexuality, human rights, welfare, rural politics, labour and youth, as well as the era's more distinctive features, such as fascism, Stalinism, the Great Depression, trench warfare and the ethnic cleansing. The Handbook serves as a guide for revising the 1914-1945 era, and for how to write histories that take the whole Europe as their subject and not merely its constituent parts: histories of Europe rather than merely in Europe.