Disposable Domestics

Immigrant Women Workers in the Global Economy

Author: Grace Chang

Publisher: Haymarket Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 235

View: 285

Illegal. Unamerican. Disposable. In a nation with an unprecedented history of immigration, the prevailing image of those who cross our borders in search of equal opportunity is that of a drain. Grace Chang's vital account of immigrant women—who work as nannies, domestic workers, janitors, nursing aides, and homecare workers—proves just the opposite: the women who perform our least desirable jobs are the most crucial to our economy and society. Disposable Domestics highlights the unrewarded work immigrant women perform as caregivers, cleaners, and servers and shows how these women are actively resisting the exploitation they face.

Global Dimensions of Gender and Carework

Author: Mary K. Zimmerman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 623

A provocative collection on women's paid and unpaid carework, examining the lives of the women at the center of new global dynamics.

Global Woman

Nannies, Maids, and Sex Workers in the New Economy

Author: Barbara Ehrenreich

Publisher: Metropolitan Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 679

In a remarkable pairing, two renowned social critics offer a groundbreaking anthology that examines the unexplored consequences of globalization on the lives of women worldwide Women are moving around the globe as never before. But for every female executive racking up frequent flier miles, there are multitudes of women whose journeys go unnoticed. Each year, millions leave Mexico, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and other third world countries to work in the homes, nurseries, and brothels of the first world. This broad-scale transfer of labor associated with women's traditional roles results in an odd displacement. In the new global calculus, the female energy that flows to wealthy countries is subtracted from poor ones, often to the detriment of the families left behind. The migrant nanny--or cleaning woman, nursing care attendant, maid--eases a "care deficit" in rich countries, while her absence creates a "care deficit" back home. Confronting a range of topics, from the fate of Vietnamese mail-order brides to the importation of Mexican nannies in Los Angeles and the selling of Thai girls to Japanese brothels, Global Woman offers an unprecedented look at a world shaped by mass migration and economic exchange on an ever-increasing scale. In fifteen vivid essays-- of which only four have been previously published-- by a diverse and distinguished group of writers, collected and introduced by bestselling authors Barbara Ehrenreich and Arlie Russell Hochschild, this important anthology reveals a new era in which the main resource extracted from the third world is no longer gold or silver, but love.

Rethinking Class in Russia

Author: Dr Suvi Salmenniemi

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 284

View: 463

Social differentiation, poverty and the emergence of the newly rich occasioned by the collapse of the Soviet Union have seldom been analysed from a class perspective. Rethinking Class in Russia addresses this absence by exploring the manner in which class positions are constructed and negotiated in the new Russia. Bringing an ethnographic and cultural studies approach to the topic, this book demonstrates that class is a central axis along which power and inequality are organized in Russia, revealing how symbolic, cultural and emotional dimensions are deeply intertwined with economic and material inequalities. Thematically arranged and presenting the latest empirical research, this interdisciplinary volume brings together work from both Western and Russian scholars on a range of spheres and practices, including popular culture, politics, social policy, consumption, education, work, family and everyday life. By engaging with discussions in new class analysis and by highlighting how the logic of global neoliberal capitalism is appropriated and negotiated vis-à-vis the Soviet hierarchies of value and worth, this book offers a multifaceted and carefully contextualized picture of class relations and identities in contemporary Russia and makes a contribution to the theorisation of class and inequality in a post-Cold War era. As such it will appeal to those with interests in sociology, anthropology, geography, political science, gender studies, Russian and Eastern European studies, and media and cultural studies.

Encyclopedia of Race, Ethnicity, and Society

Author: Richard T. Schaefer

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 1622

View: 699

This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area

Women and Death in Film, Television, and News

Dead but Not Gone

Author: Joanne Clarke Dillman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 207

View: 661

Dead women litter the visual landscape of the 2000s. In this book, Clarke Dillman explains the contextual environment from which these images have arisen, how the images relate to (and sometimes contradict) the narratives they help to constitute, and the cultural work that dead women perform in visual texts.

Global Families

Author: Meg Wilkes Karraker

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 271

View: 744

In Global Families, author Meg Karraker provides family scholars with a methodical introduction to the interdisciplinary field of globalization. Global Families then examines the ways in which globalization impinges on families throughout the world in four major areas: demographic transitions, world-wide culture, international violence, and transnational employment. The book concludes with a discussion of supra-national policies and other efforts to position families in this global landscape.

Women and Immigration Law

New Variations on Classical Feminist Themes

Author: Thomas Spijkerboer

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 435

This book examines immigration law from a gender perspective. It shows how immigration law situates gender conflicts outside the national order, projecting them onto non-western countries, exotic cultures, clandestine labour and criminal organizations. In doing so, immigration law sustains the illusion that gender conflicts have moved beyond the pale of European experience. In fact, the classical feminist themes of patriarchy, the gendered division of labour and sexual violence are still being played out at the heart of Europe's societies, involving both citizens and migrants. This collection of essays demonstrates how the seemingly marginal perspective of immigration law highlights Europe's unresolved gender conflicts and how a gender perspective can help us to rethink immigration law.

Reframing the International

Law, Culture, Politics

Author: Richard A. Falk

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 258

View: 677

Re-Framing the International insists that, if we are to properly face the challenges of the coming century, we need to re-examine international politics and development through the prism of ethics and morality. International relations must now contend with a widening circle of participants reflecting the diversity and unevenness of status, memory, gender, race, culture and class. This volume challenge North America's privileged position in world politics, suggest initiatives for improving the quality of human existence in tangible ways, and critique the conventional wisdom on how we think we can create peace and justice. It shows that, when we develop projects for world reform, we must remember that the most basic prevailing assumptions of modern law, politics, and culture are by no means as obvious, natural, or progressive as we formerly thought.

The Immigration Crucible

Transforming Race, Nation, and the Limits of the Law

Author: Philip Kretsedemas

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 224

View: 984

In the debate over U. S. immigration, all sides now support policy and practice that expand the parameters of enforcement. Philip Kretsedemas examines this development from several different perspectives, exploring recent trends in U.S. immigration policy, the rise in extralegal state power over the course of the twentieth century, and discourses on race, nation, and cultural difference that have influenced politics and academia. He also analyzes the recent expansion of local immigration law and explains how forms of extralegal discretionary authority have become more prevalent in federal immigration policy, making the dispersion of local immigration laws possible. While connecting such extralegal state powers to a free flow position on immigration, Kretsedemas also observes how these same discretionary powers have been used historically to control racial minority populations, particularly African Americans under Jim Crow. This kind of discretionary authority often appeals to "states rights" arguments, recently revived by immigration control advocates. Using these and other examples, Kretsedemas explains how both sides of the immigration debate have converged on the issue of enforcement and how, despite differing interests, each faction has shaped the commonsense assumptions defining the debate.