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Publisher: Springer-Verlag

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View: 948

Coca-Colonization and the Cold War

The Cultural Mission of the United States in Austria After the Second World War

Author: Reinhold Wagnleitner

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 392

View: 237

Reinhold Wagnleitner argues that cultural propaganda played an enormous part in integrating Austrians and other Europeans into the American sphere during the Cold War. In Coca-Colonization and the Cold War, he shows that 'Americanization' was the result not only of market forces and consumerism but also of systematic planning on the part of the United States. Wagnleitner traces the intimate relationship between the political and economic reconstruction of a democratic Austria and the parallel process of cultural assimilation. Initially, U.S. cultural programs had been developed to impress Europeans with the achievements of American high culture. However, popular culture was more readily accepted, at least among the young, who were the primary target group of the propaganda campaign. The prevalence of Coca-Cola and rock 'n' roll are just two examples addressed by Wagnleitner. Soon, the cultural hegemony of the United States became visible in nearly all quarters of Austrian life: the press, advertising, comics, literature, education, radio, music, theater, and fashion. Hollywood proved particularly effective in spreading American cultural ideals. For Europeans, says Wagnleitner, the result was a second discovery of America. This book is a translation of the Austrian edition, published in 1991, which won the Ludwig Jedlicka Memorial Prize.

In the Embrace of the Swan

Anglo-German Mythologies in Literature, the Visual Arts and Cultural Theory

Author: Rüdiger Görner

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 404

View: 167

Myths determine the way cultures understand themselves. The papers in this volume examine culturally specific myths in Britain and the German-speaking world, and compare approaches to the theory of myth, together with the ways in which mythological formations operate in literature, aesthetics and politics ‑ with a focus on the period around 1800. They enquire into the consequences of myth-oriented discourses for the way in which these two cultures understand each other, and in this way make a significant contribution to a more profound approach to intercultural research.

Die Wende Von Der Aufklärung Zur Romantik 1760-1820

Epoche Im Überblick

Author: Horst Albert Glaser

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 760

View: 428

This volume is the twelfth to date in a series of works in French or English presenting the epochs and movements of a Comparative History of Literatures in European Languages (Histoire Comparée des Littératures de Langues Européennes). The original intention of the editors was to publish a four-volume history of European literature from 1760-1820, and the first of these volumes, Des Lumières au Romantisme. Genres en Vers, appeared as long ago as 1982. The volumes Genres en Prose and Théâtre are still awaited. In their absence the present volume, Epoche im _berblick, attempts a more comprehensive and rigorous treatment of the period and its historiographical problems than was initially planned, providing the reader with an overview of sixty eventful years of European literary history — years in which German Classicism coincided with the birth, initially in Germany and England, of Romanticism. And at the centre of this turbulent period of European intellectual and literary history stands the French Revolution.

Paradoxes of Peace in Nineteenth Century Europe

Author: Thomas Hippler

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 300

View: 907

'Peace' is often simplistically assumed to be war's opposite, and as such is not examined closely or critically idealized in the literature of peace studies, its crucial role in the justification of war is often overlooked. Starting from a critical view that the value of 'restoring peace' or 'keeping peace' is, and has been, regularly used as a pretext for military intervention, this book traces the conceptual history of peace in nineteenth century legal and political practice. It explores the role of the value of peace in shaping the public rhetoric and legitimizing action in general international relations, international law, international trade, colonialism, and armed conflict. Departing from the assumption that there is no peace as such, nor can there be, it examines the contradictory visions of peace that arise from conflict. These conflicting and antagonistic visions of peace are each linked to a set of motivations and interests as well as to a certain vision of legitimacy within the international realm. Each of them inevitably conveys the image of a specific enemy that has to be crushed in order to peace being installed. This book highlights the contradictions and paradoxes in nineteenth century discourses and practices of peace, particularly in Europe.