Dark Girls

Author: Bill Duke

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 192

View: 845

In the tradition of the New York Times bestselling I Dream a World and Crowns comes this full-color companion volume to the acclaimed NAACP Award–nominated documentary Dark Girls—an inspiring and breathtaking photo book that celebrates dark-skinned women. Black has never been more beautiful, witnessed by this magnificent collection featuring accomplished dark skinned-women from all walks of life. In Dark Girls, celebrities such as Lupita Nyong'o, Vanessa Williams, Sheryl Lee Ralph, Judge Mablean Ephriam, Brandi and Karli Harvey, and over seventy-five other outstanding women share intimate insights into what their dark skin means to them. Filled with gorgeous photographs, this thoughtful, sophisticated, alluring, and uplifting collection captures the elegance of dark skin—joyfully showcasing that we truly are beautiful for who we are.

Black Girls Who Eat Sushi

Life Stories

Author: Rochell Isaac

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 148

View: 961

Black Girls who Eat Sushi: Life Stories is a series of short stories that chronicles the lives of African American women as they journey through life. Each contributor shares truthful events and situations that have helped us to evolve to the people we are today. Through these sometimes humorous and often sad stories we explore all aspects of womanhood and situate ourselves as Black women. The result is a powerful and moving portrait of Black female identity and power.

Black Girls and Adolescents: Facing the Challenges

Facing the Challenges

Author: Catherine Fisher Collins

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 426

View: 899

This one-of-a kind book challenges the current thinking about black girls to show how America has failed them—and what can be done to make their lives better. • Provides the first research work on this topic • Covers health (physical, mental, and sexual), education, crime/criminal justice, and parenting as they affect black teen girls and adolescents • Features contributors from a broad range of fields, including psychology, biology, criminal justice, sociology, spirituality, law, medicine, and popular culture • Examines characteristics of at-risk girls and the lure of the "bad girl" image • Clarifies what parents/mentors and others can do to help these girls and teens live happy, healthy, more rewarding lives

The Games Black Girls Play

Learning the Ropes from Double-dutch to Hip-hop

Author: Kyra D. Gaunt

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Games

Page: 221

View: 194

2007 Alan Merriam Prize presented by the Society for Ethnomusicology 2007 PEN/Beyond Margins Book Award Finalist When we think of African American popular music, our first thought is probably not of double-dutch: girls bouncing between two twirling ropes, keeping time to the tick-tat under their toes. But this book argues that the games black girls play —handclapping songs, cheers, and double-dutch jump rope—both reflect and inspire the principles of black popular musicmaking. The Games Black Girls Play illustrates how black musical styles are incorporated into the earliest games African American girls learn—how, in effect, these games contain the DNA of black music. Drawing on interviews, recordings of handclapping games and cheers, and her own observation and memories of gameplaying, Kyra D. Gaunt argues that black girls' games are connected to long traditions of African and African American musicmaking, and that they teach vital musical and social lessons that are carried into adulthood. In this celebration of playground poetry and childhood choreography, she uncovers the surprisingly rich contributions of girls’ play to black popular culture.

Black Women and Popular Culture

The Conversation Continues

Author: Adria Y. Goldman

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 356

View: 375

Black Women and Popular Culture: The Conversation Continues provides cutting-edge research in its analysis of the representation of Black women in popular culture and the potential implications of those images and messages. This compilation inspires critical thought and adds to the discussion on the various roles of Black women in popular culture.

The Vanishing Black African Woman: Volume Two

A Compendium of the Global Skin-Lightening Practice

Author: Olumide, Yetunde Mercy

Publisher: Langaa RPCIG

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 438

View: 929

Skin-lightening is currently one of the most common forms of potentially harmful body modification practices in the world and African women are among some of the most widely represented users of skin-lightening products. The overall objective of this book is to provide up-to-date evidence-based recommendations for reducing the global burden of cosmetic skin bleaching and preventing injuries related to skin bleaching in sub-Saharan Africa and Africans in diaspora. The book aims to: offer an appraisal of all relevant literature on cosmetic bleaching practices to-date, focusing on any key developments; identify and address important medical, public health issues as well as historical, genetic, psychosocial, cultural, behavioural, socioeconomic, political, institutional and environmental determinants; provide guideline recommendations that would help attenuate the burden and possibly eliminate the injuries related to skin bleaching; discuss potential developments and future directions.

Black Metropolis

A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City

Author: St. Clair Drake

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 912

View: 223

Ground-breaking when first published in 1945, Black Metropolis remains a landmark study of race and urban life. Few studies since have been able to match its scope and magnitude, offering one of the most comprehensive looks at black life in America. Based on research conducted by Works Progress Administration field workers, it is a sweeping historical and sociological account of the people of Chicago's South Side from the 1840s through the 1930s. Its findings offer a comprehensive analysis of black migration, settlement, community structure, and black-white race relations in the first half of the twentieth century. It offers a dizzying and dynamic world filled with captivating people and startling revelations. A new foreword from sociologist Mary Pattillo places the study in modern context, updating the story with the current state of black communities in Chicago and the larger United States and exploring what this means for the future. As the country continues to struggle with race and our treatment of black lives, Black Metropolis continues to be a powerful contribution to the conversation.

A Girl's Guide to Vampires (Dark Ones Book One)

Author: Katie MacAlister

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 300

View: 508

Joy Randall is a girl with big expectations and an even bigger love for vampire romance novels. Unsuccessful so far in her quest to find her soulmate, Joy can’t say no when her friend Roxy suggests a holiday to the Czech Republic. Tall, dark strangers? Tick. Craggy, romantic landscapes? Tick. Hoardes of centuries-old men who want to suck your blood? OK, that’s just Roxy’s over-active imagination. After all, vampires don’t exist . . . do they? Plagued by dreams of a handsome stranger, haunted by a mysterious prophecy, and pursued by three pale, brooding, slightly sinister suitors, Joy isn’t so sure now. Worried about her growing attraction to the enigmatic Raphael, she knows that one thing’s for certain: Mr. Right should not equal Mr. Heading-Right-For-Your-Neck. But can she resist the lure of the Dark Ones? Is her attraction to Raphael just lust . . . or blood lust? And will she find a chosen life partner that is, well, alive? Nowadays, finding The One sure is a pain in the neck . . .

Fireflies in the Dark

A Collection of Short Stories

Author: Annie Chandy Mathew

Publisher: unisun publications

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 268

View: 488

A collection of 23 short stories, it sets off the darkness of guilt, exploitation, pain and hatred against the redemptive power of love, hope and the courage to care.

The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl

Author: Issa Rae

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 224

View: 641

The “brilliantly wry” (Lena Dunham) and “lovably awkward” (Mindy Kaling) New York Times bestseller from the creator of HBO’s Insecure. In this universally accessible New York Times bestseller named for her wildly popular web series, Issa Rae—“a singular voice with the verve and vivacity of uncorked champagne” (Kirkus Reviews)—waxes humorously on what it’s like to be unabashedly awkward in a world that regards introverts as hapless misfits and black as cool. I’m awkward—and black. Someone once told me those were the two worst things anyone could be. That someone was right. Where do I start? Being an introvert (as well as “funny,” according to the Los Angeles Times) in a world that glorifies cool isn’t easy. But when Issa Rae, the creator of the Shorty Award-winning hit series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, is that introvert—whether she’s navigating love, the workplace, friendships, or “rapping”—it sure is entertaining. Now, in this New York Times bestselling debut collection written in her witty and self-deprecating voice, Rae covers everything from cybersexing in the early days of the Internet to deflecting unsolicited comments on weight gain, from navigating the perils of eating out alone and public displays of affection to learning to accept yourself—natural hair and all. The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl is a book no one—awkward or cool, black, white, or other—will want to miss.