Coming Home to Myself

Reflections for Nurturing a Woman's Body and Soul

Author: Marion Woodman

Publisher: Conari Press

ISBN:

Category: Self-Help

Page: 280

View: 366

A meditation book for women seeking to raise to their self-esteem & connect more fully with themselves.

Coming Home to Myself

Author: Wynonna Judd

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 569

From the heart of one of the world’s most beloved entertainers comes an engaging memoir of professional triumph, private heartbreak, and personal victory. It didn’t take Wynonna Judd long to find her purpose—or her voice. She picked up her first guitar at nine and in less that ten years was performing with her mother Naomi in a celebrated, multiple-award-winning, platinum-selling duo—a phenomenal success story that would set the stage for an equally triumphant solo career. Then came the turning point that forced the country music superstar to take a hard look at where she was, how she got there, and where she was headed. The result is Coming Home to Myself, an intimate look into the life of the chart-topping legend. From her humble roots to the career changes that would define the second half of her dynamic life, this memoir of survival, strength, family, and forgiveness will resonate with anyone who ever dreamed of finding themselves.

Coming Home to Story

Storytelling Beyond Happily Ever After

Author: Geoff Mead

Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 322

Stories take us into other worlds so that we may experience our own more deeply. Master storyteller Geoff Mead brings the reader inside the experience of telling and listening to a story. He shows how stories and storytelling engage our imaginations, strengthen communities and bring adventure and joy into our lives. The narrative is interspersed with consummate retellings of traditional tales from all over the world.

Liberating Eschatology

Essays in Honor of Letty M. Russell

Author: Letty M. Russell

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 261

View: 440

This volume addresses a theme long essential to feminist and liberationist theology: in what can we hope, and what role should hope play in our actions and our lives? It provides a constructive set of proposals and fills a crucial gap in theological resources as well-known contributors address the theme from their different contexts and fields.

On Chinese Body Thinking

A Cultural Hermeneutics

Author: Kuang Min Wu

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 492

View: 884

This book uses Western philosophical tradition to make a case for a form of thinking properly associated with ancient China. The book's thesis is that Chinese thinking is concrete rather than formal and abstract, and this is gathered in a variety of ways under the symbol "body thinking." The root of the metaphor is that the human body has a kind of intelligence in its most basic functions. When hungry the body gets food and eats, when tired it sleeps, when amused it laughs. In free people these things happen instinctively but not automatically. The metaphor of body thinking is extended far beyond bodily functions in the ordinary sense to personal and communal life, to social functions and to cultivation of the arts of civilization. As the metaphor is extended, the way to stay concrete in thinking with subtlety becomes a kind of ironic play, a natural adeptness at saying things with silences. Play and indirection are the roads around formalism and abstraction. Western formal thinking, it is argued, can be sharpened by Chinese body thinking to exhibit spontaneity and to produce healthy human thought in a community of cultural variety.

Coming Home to Clearwater

Author: Dale McMillan

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 524

View: 928

The Simmonses are an unusual family. Each in their own way exhibits servants hearts, love of family, home, country, and a strong Christian faith. They make a full circle in this writing, with each in their own way contributing. The period covered by this story was a period of upheaval in America. Integration was in full bloom, the peace movement and the Vietnam War, The Kennedy and King assignation took place during this period. George Simmons has his hands full as he guides Clearwater through safe passage during this era. Ike Simmons comes of age and aids George as he charts the course through integration of Clearwater schools. Chassity, Mamie, and Woodrow are in the middle of everything; each contributing.

Thin Places

A Pilgrimage Home

Author: Ann Armbrecht

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 357

Thin Places is an eloquent meditation on what it means to move between cultures and how one might finally come home, a particular paradox in a culture that lacks deep ties to the natural world. During the 1990s, Ann Armbrecht, an American anthropologist, made several trips to northeastern Nepal to research how the Yamphu Rai acquired, farmed, and held onto their land; how they perceived their area's recent designation as a national park and conservation area; and whether as she believed they held a wisdom about living on the earth that the industrialized West had forgotten. What Armbrecht found instead were men and women who shared her restlessness, people also driven by the feeling that there must be more to life than they could find in their village. "We each blamed our dissatisfaction on something in the world," she writes, "not something in ourselves or in the stories we told ourselves about that world. If only we lived elsewhere, then we would be at home." Charting Armbrecht's travels in the mountains of Nepal and in the United States and her disintegrating marriage back home, Thin Places is ultimately an exploration not of the sacred far-off but of the sacredness of places that are between between the internal and external landscape, the self and others, and the self and the land. She finds that home is not a place where we arrive but a way of being in place, wherever that place may be. Along the way, Armbrecht explores the disconnections in our most intimate relationships, how they stem from the same disconnections that create our destruction of the land, and how one cannot be healed without attending to the other.

Curriculum and the Holocaust

Competing Sites of Memory and Representation

Author: Marla Morris

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 288

View: 872

In this book, Morris explores the intersection of curriculum studies, Holocaust studies, and psychoanalysis, using the Holocaust to raise issues of memory and representation. Arguing that memory is the larger category under which history is subsumed, she examines the ways in which the Holocaust is represented in texts written by historians and by novelists. For both, psychological transference, repression, denial, projection, and reversal contribute heavily to shaping personal memories, and may therefore determine the ways in which they construct the past. The way the Holocaust is represented in curricula is the way it is remembered. Interrogations of this memory are crucial to our understandings of who we are in today's world. The subject of this text--how this memory is represented and how the process of remembering it is taught--is thus central to education today.

Coming Home to Germany?

The Integration of Ethnic Germans from Central and Eastern Europe in the Federal Republic

Author: David Rock

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 234

View: 834

The end of World War II led to one of the most significant forced population transfers in history: the expulsion of over 12 million ethnic Germans from Central and Eastern Europe between 1945 and 1950 and the subsequent emigration of another four million in the second half of the twentieth century. Although unprecedented in its magnitude, conventional wisdom has it that the integration of refugees, expellees, and Aussiedler was a largely successful process in postwar Germany. While the achievements of the integration process are acknowledged, the volume also examines the difficulties encountered by ethnic Germans in the Federal Republic and analyses the shortcomings of dealing with this particular phenomenon of mass migration and its consequences.

Finding the Deep River Within

A Woman's Guide to Recovering Balance and Meaning in Everyday Life

Author: Abby Seixas

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 966

Psychotherapist Abby Seixas examines women who are chronically busy, providing guidance to help women reassess their priorities, slow down, and enjoy their lives, and discussing to-do lists, keeping a journal, making choices, and other related topics.