Closer to Freedom

Enslaved Women and Everyday Resistance in the Plantation South: Easyread Large Edition

Author: Stephanie M. H. Camp

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 420

View: 246

Recent scholarship on slavery has explored the lives of enslaved people beyond the watchful eye of their masters. Building on this work and the study of space, social relations, gender, and power in the Old South, Stephanie M.H. Camp examines the everyday containment and movement of enslaved men and, especially, enslaved women. In her investigation of the movement of bodies, objects, and information, she extends our recognition of slave resistance into new arenas and reveals an important and hidden culture of opposition. Camp discusses the multiple dimensions to acts of resistance that might otherwise appear to be little more than fits of temper. She brings new depth to our understanding of the lives of enslaved women, whose bodies and homes were inevitably political arenas. Through Camp's insight, truancy becomes an act of pursuing personal privacy. Illegal parties (''frolics'') become an expression of bodily freedom. And bondwomen who acquired printed abolitionist materials and posted them on the walls of their slave cabins (even if they could not read them) become the subtle agitators who inspire more overt acts. The culture of opposition created by enslaved women's everyday resistance helped foment and sustain the more visible resistance of men in the individual act of running away and in the collective action of slave revolts. Ultimately, Camp argues, the Civil War years saw revolutionary change that had been in the making for decades.

Enslaved Women in America: An Encyclopedia

An Encyclopedia

Author: Daina Ramey Berry Ph.D.

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 381

View: 522

This singular reference provides an authoritative account of the daily lives of enslaved women in the United States, from colonial times to emancipation following the Civil War. Through essays, photos, and primary source documents, the female experience is explored, and women are depicted as central, rather than marginal, figures in history. • Dozens of photos of former enslaved women • Detailed historical timeline • Numerous rare primary documents, including runaway slave advertisements and even a plantation recipe for turtle soup • Profiles of noted female slaves and their works

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 13: Gender

Author: Nancy Bercaw

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 408

View: 730

This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture reflects the dramatic increase in research on the topic of gender over the past thirty years, revealing that even the most familiar subjects take on new significance when viewed through the lens of gender. The wide range of entries explores how people have experienced, understood, and used concepts of womanhood and manhood in all sorts of obvious and subtle ways. The volume features 113 articles, 65 of which are entirely new for this edition. Thematic articles address subjects such as sexuality, respectability, and paternalism and investigate the role of gender in broader subjects, including the civil rights movement, country music, and sports. Topical entries highlight individuals such as Oprah Winfrey, the Grimke sisters, and Dale Earnhardt, as well as historical events such as the capture of Jefferson Davis in a woman's dress, the Supreme Court's decision in Loving v. Virginia, and the Memphis sanitation workers' strike, with its slogan, "I AM A MAN." Bringing together scholarship on gender and the body, sexuality, labor, race, and politics, this volume offers new ways to view big questions in southern history and culture.

Program

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Historians

Page:

View: 536

OAH Annual Meeting

Author: Organization of American Historians. Meeting

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Historians

Page:

View: 384

Gender in History

Global Perspectives

Author: Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 838

Updated with new material to reflect the latest developments in the field, Gender in History: Global Perspectives, 2nd Edition, provides a concise overview of the construction of gender in world cultures from the Paleolithic era to modern times. Includes examples drawn from the most recent scholarship relating to a diverse range of cultures, from Ancient Mesopotamia to post-Soviet Russia, and from the Igbo of Nigeria, to the Iroquois of north eastern North America. Reflects new developments in the field with added coverage of primates, slavery, colonialism, masculinity, and transgender issues Features significant discussion of the Paleolithic and Neolithic periods, an important trend in the study of world history Lays out key theoretical and methodological issues in an introduction that is written in accessible language Supplementary material for instructors and students available at www.wiley.com/go/wiesnerhanks

The Journal of Southern History

Author: Wendell Holmes Stephenson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic journals

Page:

View: 528

Includes section "Book reviews."

Women and Patriotism in Jim Crow America

Author: Francesca Morgan

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 293

View: 714

Morgan examines the shaping of American identity and nationalism by white and black women in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, particularly through their work in clubs such as the multiracial Woman's Relief Corps, the National Association of Colored Women, the Universal Negro Improvement Association, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Daughters of the American Revolution.

The freedom of the streets

work, citizenship, and sexuality in a gilded age city

Author: Sharon E. Wood

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 321

View: 230

Gilded Age cities offered extraordinary opportunities to women--but at a price. As clerks, factory hands, and professionals flocked downtown to earn a living, they alarmed social critics and city fathers, who warned that self-supporting women were just steps away from becoming prostitutes. With in-depth research possible only in a mid-sized city, Sharon E. Wood focuses on Davenport, Iowa, to explore the lives of working women and the prostitutes who shared their neighborhoods. The single, self-supporting women who migrated to Davenport in the years following the Civil War saw paid labor as the foundation of citizenship. They took up the tools of public and political life to assert the respectability of paid employment and to confront the demon of prostitution. Wood offers cradle-to-grave portraits of individual girls and women--both prostitutes and "respectable" white workers--seeking to reshape their city and expand women's opportunities. As Wood demonstrates, however, their efforts to rewrite the sexual politics of the streets met powerful resistance at every turn from men defending their political rights and sexual power.