Classical Topology and Combinatorial Group Theory

Author:

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 301

View: 642

In recent years, many students have been introduced to topology in high school mathematics. Having met the Mobius band, the seven bridges of Konigsberg, Euler's polyhedron formula, and knots, the student is led to expect that these picturesque ideas will come to full flower in university topology courses. What a disappointment "undergraduate topology" proves to be! In most institutions it is either a service course for analysts, on abstract spaces, or else an introduction to homological algebra in which the only geometric activity is the completion of commutative diagrams. Pictures are kept to a minimum, and at the end the student still does not understand the simplest topological facts, such as the reason why knots exist. In my opinion, a well-balanced introduction to topology should stress its intuitive geometric aspect, while admitting the legitimate interest that analysts and algebraists have in the subject. At any rate, this is the aim of the present book. In support of this view, I have followed the historical develop ment where practicable, since it clearly shows the influence of geometric thought at all stages. This is not to claim that topology received its main impetus from geometric recrea. ions like the seven bridges; rather, it resulted from the visualization of problems from other parts of mathematics complex analysis (Riemann), mechanics (poincare), and group theory (Oehn). It is these connections to other parts of mathematics which make topology an important as well as a beautiful subject.

Combinatorial Group Theory

A Topological Approach

Author: Daniel E. Cohen

Publisher: CUP Archive

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 310

View: 331

In this book the author aims to show the value of using topological methods in combinatorial group theory.

Combinatorial Group Theory and Applications to Geometry

Author: D.J. Collins

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 240

View: 396

This book consists of two parts. The first part provides a comprehensive description of that part of group theory which has its roots in topology. The second more advanced part deals with recent work on groups relating to topological manifolds. It is a valuable guide to research in this field. The text contains numerous examples, sketches of proofs and open problems.

Relativistic Reality

A Modern View

Author: J. D. Edmonds

Publisher: World Scientific

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 352

View: 600

It now appears that the old argument about Lorentz vs Galileo relativity is passing into history. The Lorentz symmetry may soon become obsolete itself just as the Galileo symmetry did about 1900. The tremendous successes of QED represent real progress in our quest to understand nature. The answer is not to go as most OC outsidersOCO but to go forward OCo beyond to new ideas and equations that will match nature even better than QED does. This book shows us a new view of relativity and quantum equations. It has new equations that extend Lorentz Maxwell and Dirac."

Algebraic Topology

A First Course

Author: William Fulton

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 430

View: 811

To the Teacher. This book is designed to introduce a student to some of the important ideas of algebraic topology by emphasizing the re lations of these ideas with other areas of mathematics. Rather than choosing one point of view of modem topology (homotopy theory, simplicial complexes, singular theory, axiomatic homology, differ ential topology, etc.), we concentrate our attention on concrete prob lems in low dimensions, introducing only as much algebraic machin ery as necessary for the problems we meet. This makes it possible to see a wider variety of important features of the subject than is usual in a beginning text. The book is designed for students of mathematics or science who are not aiming to become practicing algebraic topol ogists-without, we hope, discouraging budding topologists. We also feel that this approach is in better harmony with the historical devel opment of the subject. What would we like a student to know after a first course in to pology (assuming we reject the answer: half of what one would like the student to know after a second course in topology)? Our answers to this have guided the choice of material, which includes: under standing the relation between homology and integration, first on plane domains, later on Riemann surfaces and in higher dimensions; wind ing numbers and degrees of mappings, fixed-point theorems; appli cations such as the Jordan curve theorem, invariance of domain; in dices of vector fields and Euler characteristics; fundamental groups

Elements of Functional Analysis

Author: Francis Hirsch

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 396

View: 323

This book presents the fundamental function spaces and their duals, explores operator theory and finally develops the theory of distributions up to significant applications such as Sobolev spaces and Dirichlet problems. Includes an assortment of well formulated exercises, with answers and hints collected at the end of the book.

Representations of Compact Lie Groups

Author: T. Bröcker

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 316

View: 218

This introduction to the representation theory of compact Lie groups follows Herman Weyl’s original approach. It discusses all aspects of finite-dimensional Lie theory, consistently emphasizing the groups themselves. Thus, the presentation is more geometric and analytic than algebraic. It is a useful reference and a source of explicit computations. Each section contains a range of exercises, and 24 figures help illustrate geometric concepts.

Complexity: Knots, Colourings and Countings

Author: Dominic Welsh

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 163

View: 527

These notes are based on a series of lectures given at the Advanced Research Institute of Discrete Applied Mathematics, Rutgers University.

Algorithms -- ESA 2010, Part II

18th Annual European Symposium, Liverpool, UK, September 6-8, 2010, Proceedings

Author: Mark de Berg

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 245

View: 262

This volume contains the 69 papers presented at the 16th Annual European Symposium on Algorithms (ESA 2010), held in Liverpool during September 6 8, 2010, including three papers by the distinguished invited speakers Artur Czumaj, Herbert Edelsbrunner, and Paolo Ferragina. ESA 2010 was organized as a part of ALGO 2010, which also included the 10th Workshop on Algorithms in Bioinformatics (WABI), the 8th Workshop on Approximation and Online Algorithms (WAOA), and the 10th Workshop on Algorithmic Approaches for Transportation Modeling, Optimization, and Systems (ATMOS). The European Symposium on Algorithms covers research in the design, use, andanalysisofe?cientalgorithmsanddata structures.As inpreviousyears, the symposium had two tracks: the Design and Analysis Track and the Engineering and Applications Track, each with its own Program Committee. In total 245 papers adhering to the submission guidelines were submitted. Each paper was reviewed by three or four referees. Based on the reviews and the often extensive electronicdiscussionsfollowingthem, thecommittees selected 66papersintotal: 56 (out of 206) to the Design and Analysis Track and 10 (out of 39) to the Engineering andApplicationstrack.We believethat thesepaperstogethermade up a strong and varied program, showing the depth and breadth of current algorithms research."

Combinatorial Group Theory

Proceedings of the AMS Special Session in Combinatorial Group Theory-infinite Groups, April 23-24, 1988

Author: Benjamin Fine

Publisher: American Mathematical Soc.

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 191

View: 610

The AMS Special Session on Combinatorial Group Theory--Infinite Groups, held at the University of Maryland in April 1988, was designed to draw together researchers in various areas of infinite group theory, especially combinatorial group theory, to share methods and results. The session reflected the vitality and interests in infinite group theory, with eighteen speakers presenting lectures covering a wide range of group-theoretic topics, from purely logical questions to geometric methods. The heightened interest in classical combinatorial group theory was reflected in the sheer volume of work presented during the session. This book consists of eighteen papers presented during the session. Comprising a mix of pure research and exposition, the papers should be sufficiently understandable to the nonspecialist to convey a sense of the direction of this field. However, the volume will be of special interest to researchers in infinite group theory and combinatorial group theory, as well as to those interested in low-dimensional (especially three-manifold) topology.