Citizen Scientist

Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction

Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615192441

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 4249

A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2016: “Intelligent and impassioned, Citizen Scientist is essential reading for anyone interested in the natural world.” Award-winning writer Mary Ellen Hannibal has long reported on scientists’ efforts to protect vanishing species, but it was only through citizen science that she found she could take action herself. As she wades into tide pools, spots hawks, and scours mountains, she discovers the power of the heroic volunteers who are helping scientists measure—and even slow—today’s unprecedented mass extinction. Citizen science may be the future of large-scale field research—and our planet’s last, best hope.

Citizen Scientist

Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction

Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615192433

Category: Nature

Page: 423

View: 6574

A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2016: "Intelligent and impassioned, Citizen Scientist is essential reading for anyone interested in the natural world." Award-winning writer Mary Ellen Hannibal has long reported on scientists' efforts to protect vanishing species, but it was only through citizen science that she found she could take action herself. As she wades into tide pools, spots hawks, and scours mountains, she discovers the power of the heroic volunteers who are helping scientists measure--and even slow--today's unprecedented mass extinction. Citizen science may be the future of large-scale field research--and our planet's last, best hope.

Citizen Scientist

Searching for Heroes and Hope in an Age of Extinction

Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal

Publisher: The Experiment

ISBN: 1615193987

Category: Endemic animals

Page: 432

View: 1099

A science writer, mourning the recent loss of her father, finds solace in citizen science, with its promise to slow and reverse another kind of loss she's been deeply grappling with--the unprecedented mass extinction of species Here is a wide-ranging adventure in becoming a citizen scientist by an award-winning writer and environmental thought leader. As Mary Ellen Hannibal wades into tide pools, follows hawks, and scours mountains to collect data on threatened species, she discovers the power of a heroic cast of volunteers--and the makings of what may be our last, best hope in slowing an unprecedented mass extinction. Digging deeply, Hannibal traces today's tech-enabled citizen science movement to its roots: the centuries-long tradition of amateur observation by writers and naturalists. Prompted by her novelist father's sudden death, she also examines her own past--and discovers a family legacy of looking closely at the world. With unbending zeal for protecting the planet, she then turns her gaze to the wealth of species left to fight for. Combining original reporting, meticulous research, and memoir in impassioned prose, Citizen Scientist is a literary event, a blueprint for action, and the story of how one woman rescued herself from an odyssey of loss--with a new kind of science.

Citizen Science: How Ordinary People are Changing the Face of Discovery

Author: Caren Cooper

Publisher: The Overlook Press

ISBN: 1468314149

Category: Science

Page: 288

View: 9509

The engaging history of the people whose contributions to scientific pursuits make us rethink the meaning of the word "scientist." Think you need a degree in science to contribute to important scientific discoveries? Think again. All around the world, in fields ranging from astronomy to zoology, millions of everyday people are choosing to participate in the scientific process. Working in cooperation with scientists in pursuit of information, innovation, and discovery, these volunteers are following protocols, collecting and reviewing data, and sharing their observations. They are our neighbors, our in-laws, and people in the office down the hall. Their story, along with the story of the social good that can result from citizen science, has largely been untold, until now. Citizen scientists are challenging old notions about who can conduct research, where knowledge can be acquired, and even how solutions to some of our biggest societal problems might emerge. In telling their story, Cooper will inspire readers to rethink their own assumptions about the role that individuals can play in gaining scientific understanding and putting that understanding to use as stewards of our world. Citizen Science will be a rallying call-to-arms, and will also function as an authoritative resource for those inspired by the featured stories and message.

The Rightful Place of Science

Citizen Science

Author: Darlene Cavalier,Eric Kennedy

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780692694831

Category:

Page: 152

View: 2330

This volume in The Rightful Place of Science series explores citizen science, the movement to reshape the relationship between science and the public. By not only participating in scientific projects but actively helping to decide what research questions are asked and how that research is conducted, ordinary citizens are transforming how science benefits society. Through vivid chapters that describe the history and theory of citizen science, detailed examples of brilliant citizen science projects, and a look at the movement's future, The Rightful Place of Science: Citizen Science is the ideal guide for anyone interested in one of the most important trends in scientific practice.

Citizen Science

Public Participation in Environmental Research

Author: Janis L. Dickinson,Richard E. Bonney, Jr.

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801464420

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 7187

Citizen science enlists members of the public to make and record useful observations, such as counting birds in their backyards, watching for the first budding leaf in spring, or measuring local snowfall. The large numbers of volunteers who participate in projects such as Project FeederWatch or Project BudBurst collect valuable research data, which, when pooled together, create an enormous body of scientific data on a vast geographic scale. In return, such projects aim to increase participants’ connections to science, place, and nature, while supporting science literacy and environmental stewardship. In Citizen Science, experts from a variety of disciplines—including scientists and education specialists working at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, where many large citizen science programs use birds as proxies for biodiversity—share their experiences of creating and implementing successful citizen science projects, primarily those that use massive data sets gathered by citizen scientists to better understand the impact of environmental change. This first and foundational book for this developing field of inquiry addresses basic aspects of how to conduct citizen science projects, including goal-setting, program design, and evaluation, as well as the nuances of creating a robust digital infrastructure and recruiting a large participant base through communications and marketing. An overview of the types of research approaches and techniques demonstrates how to make use of large data sets arising from citizen science projects. A final section focuses on citizen science’s impacts and its broad connections to understanding the human dimensions and educational aspects of participation. Citizen Science teaches teams of program developers and researchers how to cross the bridge from success at public engagement to using citizen science data to understand patterns and trends or to test hypotheses about how ecological processes respond to change at large geographic scales. Intended as a resource for a broad audience of experts and practitioners in natural sciences, information science, and social sciences, this book can be used to better understand how to improve existing programs, develop new ones, and make better use of the data resources that have accumulated from citizen science efforts. Its focus on harnessing the impact of "crowdsourcing" for scientific and educational endeavors is applicable to a wide range of fields, especially those that touch on the importance of massive collaboration aimed at understanding and conserving what we can of the natural world.

Shooting in the Wild

An Insider's Account of Making Movies in the Animal Kingdom

Author: Chris Palmer

Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com

ISBN: 1458715582

Category:

Page: 384

View: 1580

Longtime producer Palmer provides an in-depth look at wild animals on film, covering the history of wildlife documentaries, safety issues, and the never-ending pressure to obtain the "money shot." Marlin Perkins, Jacques Cousteau, Steve Irwin, Timothy Treadwell, and many other familiar names are discussed along with their work, accidents, and in some cases, untimely deaths. Palmer is highly critical of Irwin, and offers fascinating revelations about game farms used by exploitative filmmakers and photographers looking for easy shots and willing to use caged animals to obtain them. He also considers the subliminal messages of many wildlife films, considering everything from Shark Week to Happy Feet and how they manipulate audiences toward preset conclusions about animal behavior. In all this is an engaging and exceedingly timely look at a form of entertainment the public has long taken for granted and which, as Palmer points out, really needs a fresh and careful reconsideration.

Citizen Science Guide for Families

Taking Part in Real Science

Author: Greg Landgraf

Publisher: Huron Street Press

ISBN: 9781937589356

Category: Science

Page: 176

View: 6139

People of all ages and backgrounds can discover how to contribute to real scientific research with this handy guide. It defines citizen science, providing an overview of the social and community aspects behind the idea. The book is organized by topic and features links to library resources and descriptions of books appropriate to the subject. In addition, a section devoted to ongoing citizen-science programs includes detailed descriptions for parents and children to identify projects appropriate to their interests, abilities, commitment levels, and locations. Accessible for the whole family, this invaluable resource provides the tools for building strong families as well as improving the global community.

The Incidental Steward

Reflections on Citizen Science

Author: Akiko Busch

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300195087

Category: Science

Page: 256

View: 9261

DIV A search for a radio-tagged Indiana bat roosting in the woods behind her house in New York’s Hudson Valley led Akiko Busch to assorted other encounters with the natural world—local ecological monitoring projects, community-organized cleanup efforts, and data-driven citizen science research. Whether it is pulling up water chestnuts in the Hudson River, measuring beds of submerged aquatic vegetation, or searching out vernal pools, all are efforts that illuminate the role of ordinary citizens as stewards of place. In this elegantly written book, Busch highlights factors that distinguish twenty-first-century citizen scientists from traditional amateur naturalists: a greater sense of urgency, helpful new technologies, and the expanded possibilities of crowdsourcing. The observations here look both to precisely recorded data sheets and to the impressionistic marginalia, scribbled asides, and side roads that often attend such unpredictable outings. While not a primer on the prescribed protocols of citizen science, the book combines vivid natural history, a deep sense of place, and reflection about our changing world. Musing on the expanding potential of citizen science, the author celebrates today’s renewed volunteerism and the opportunities it offers for regaining a deep sense of connection to place. /div

Evidence of Evolution

Author: Susan Middleton

Publisher: Harry N Abrams Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Photography

Page: 127

View: 1566

Describes the patterns of evolutionary development in animals and plants, overviewing the key concepts that explain life on Earth.

The Spine of the Continent

The Race to Save America's Last, Best Wilderness

Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal

Publisher: Lyons Press

ISBN: 9780762786787

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 5490

In The Spine of the Continent, Mary Ellen Hannibal travels the length of North America and reports on efforts to create a wildlife corridor through Canada, the United States, and Mexico, begun with the purpose of protecting landscapes so that animals and plants have room to roam.

The Wizard and the Prophet

Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World

Author: Charles C. Mann

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN: 0307961702

Category: Science

Page: 640

View: 6212

From the best-selling, award-winning author of 1491 and 1493--an incisive portrait of the two little-known twentieth-century scientists, Norman Borlaug and William Vogt, whose diametrically opposed views shaped our ideas about the environment, laying the groundwork for how people in the twenty-first century will choose to live in tomorrow's world. In forty years, Earth's population will reach ten billion. Can our world support that? What kind of world will it be? Those answering these questions generally fall into two deeply divided groups--Wizards and Prophets, as Charles Mann calls them in this balanced, authoritative, nonpolemical new book. The Prophets, he explains, follow William Vogt, a founding environmentalist who believed that in using more than our planet has to give, our prosperity will lead us to ruin. Cut back! was his mantra. Otherwise everyone will lose! The Wizards are the heirs of Norman Borlaug, whose research, in effect, wrangled the world in service to our species to produce modern high-yield crops that then saved millions from starvation. Innovate! was Borlaug's cry. Only in that way can everyone win! Mann delves into these diverging viewpoints to assess the four great challenges humanity faces--food, water, energy, climate change--grounding each in historical context and weighing the options for the future. With our civilization on the line, the author's insightful analysis is an essential addition to the urgent conversation about how our children will fare on an increasingly crowded Earth.

The Mountains That Remade America

How Sierra Nevada Geology Impacts Modern Life

Author: Craig H. Jones

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520289641

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 5102

From ski towns to national parks, fresh fruit to environmental lawsuits, the Sierra Nevada has changed the way Americans live. Where there was gold to be mined (and where there was not) redefined land, mineral, and water laws. Where rain falls (and where it doesn’t) determines whose fruit grows on trees and whose appears on slot machines. All this emerges from the geology of the range and how it changed history, and in so doing, changed the country. The Mountains That Remade America combines geology with history to show how the particular forces and conditions that created the Sierra Nevada have effected broad outcomes and influenced daily life in the United States in the past and continue to do so today. Drawing connections between events in historical geology and contemporary society, Craig H. Jones makes geological science accessible and shows the vast impact this mountain range has had on the American West.

Citizen Science in the Digital Age

Rhetoric, Science, and Public Engagement

Author: James Wynn

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817319433

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 207

View: 6828

In Citizen Science in the Digital Age, James Wynn examines the benefits and pitfalls of citizen science--scientific undertakings that make use of public participation and crowd-sourced data collection.

Living Downstream

An Ecologist Looks at Cancer and the Environment

Author: Sandra Steingraber

Publisher: Virago Press

ISBN: 9781860495359

Category: Cancer

Page: 357

View: 2342

Published more than three decades after Rachel Carson's Silent Spring warned of the impact of chemicals on the environment, this book offers a critique of current thinking on cancer and its causes. It argues that the evidence has been wilfully ignored, and that the environment is still being poisoned. Throughout her study, the author weaves two stories - of Rachel Carson and her battle to be heard and of her own cancer of the bladder, which she traces back to agricultural and industrial contamination.

Spine of the Continent

The Race to Save America's Last, Best Wilderness

Author: Mary Ellen Hannibal

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 0762788828

Category: Nature

Page: 288

View: 4895

As climate change encroaches, natural habitats are shifting while human development makes islands of even the largest nature reserves, stranding the biodiversity within them. The Spine of the Continent profiles the most ambitious conservation effort ever made: to create linked protected areas from the Yukon to Mexico. Backed by blue-ribbon scientific foundations, the Spine is a grassroots, cooperative effort among NGOs large and small and everyday citizens. It aims not only to make physical connections so nature will persist but also to make connections between people and the land. In this fascinating and important account, Mary Ellen Hannibal travels the length of the Spine and shares stories of the impassioned activists she meets and the critters they love.

Tipping Point for Planet Earth

How Close Are We to the Edge?

Author: Anthony D. Barnosky,Elizabeth A. Hadly

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 1466852011

Category: Nature

Page: 224

View: 6039

Four people are born every second of every day. Conservative estimates suggest that there will be 10 billion people on Earth by 2050. That is billions more than the natural resources of our planet can sustain without big changes in how we use and manage them. So what happens when vast population growth endangers the world’s food supplies? Or our water? Our energy needs, climate, or environment? Or the planet’s biodiversity? What happens if some or all of these become critical at once? Just what is our future? In Tipping Point for Planet Earth, world-renowned scientists Anthony Barnosky and Elizabeth Hadly explain the growing threats to humanity as the planet edges toward resource wars for remaining space, food, oil, and water. And as they show, these wars are not the nightmares of a dystopian future, but are already happening today. Finally, they ask: at what point will inaction lead to the break-up of the intricate workings of the global society? The planet is in danger now, but the solutions, as Barnosky and Hadly show, are still available. We still have the chance to avoid the tipping point and to make the future better. But this window of opportunity will shut within ten to twenty years. Tipping Point for Planet Earth is the wake-up call we need.

The Song Of The Dodo

Island Biogeography in an Age of Extinctions

Author: David Quammen

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 1448137403

Category: Nature

Page: 704

View: 7064

Why have island ecosystems always suffered such high rates of extinction? In our age, with all the world's landscapes, from Tasmania to the Amazon to Yellowstone, now being carved into island-like fragments by human activity, the implications of this question are more urgent than ever. Over the past eight years, David Quammen has followed the threads of island biogeography on a globe-encircling journey of discovery.

The Last Refuge

Patriotism, Politics, and the Environment in an Age of Terror

Author: David W. Orr

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 1597268968

Category: Political Science

Page: 232

View: 4157

"Patriotism is the last refuge of scoundrels" -SAMUEL JOHNSON, 1775 "a tightly reasoned, excellently written book that should be lethally effective in helping readers who aren't experts understand the contours of the crisis." -TOLEDO BLADE Updated and revised following the 2004 elections, The Last Refuge describes the current state of American politics against the backdrop of mounting ecological and social problems, the corrosive influence of money, the corruption of language, and the misuse of terrorism as a political issue. Setting out an agenda that transcends conventional ideological labels, David Orr contends that partisan wrangling is only a symptom of a deeper dysfunction: The whole political machinery that connects Americans' fundamentally honorable ideals with public policy is broken. The book offers a withering critique of the failings of the Bush administration, supplemented by new essays that look at the national-level dominance of the Republican Party and examine the fallacy that the evangelical right represents a Christian majority. After analyzing the challenges of reforming the current system, Orr offers an empowering vision of a second American Revolution that peaceably achieves sustainability and charts a hopeful course for forward-looking citizens.

Diary of a Citizen Scientist

Chasing Tiger Beetles and Other New Ways of Engaging the World

Author: Sharman Apt Russell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780870717529

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 222

View: 8748

In the exploding world of citizen science, hundreds of thousands of volunteers are monitoring climate change, tracking bird migration and stardust for NASA, or excavating mastodons. The sheer number of citizen scientists, combined with new technology, is beginning to shape how research gets done. Russell takes over a year to study a little-known species of tiger beetle, often used as a marker of biodiversity. With an admitted degree of misplaced confidence, she patrols the New Mexico's Gila River, net in hand, negotiating the realities of climate change and celebrating the landscape's beauty. Concurrently, she explores other citizen science projects in archaeology, astronomy, meteorology, and phenology.