Child Sexual Abuse in Victorian England

Author: Louise A. Jackson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 876

Child Sexual Abuse in Victorian England is the first detailed investigation of the way that child abuse was discovered, debated, diagnosed and dealt with in the Victorian and Edwardian periods. The focus is placed on the child and his or her experience of court procedure and welfare practice, thereby providing a unique and important evaluation of the treatment of children in the courtroom. Through a series of case studies, including analyses of the criminal courts, the author examines the impact of legislation at grass roots level, and demonstrates why this was a formative period in the legal definition of sexual abuse. Providing a much-needed insight into Victorian attitudes, including that of Christian morality, this book makes a distinctive contribution to the history of crime, social welfare and the family. It also offers a valuable critique of current work on the history of children's homes and institutions, arguing that the inter-personal relationships of children and carers is a crucial area of study.

Women's History

Britain, 1700-1850 : an Introduction

Author: Hannah Barker

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 648

Placing women's experiences in the context of the major social, economic and cultural shifts that accompanied the industrial and commercial transformations of this period, Hannah Barker and Elaine Chalus paint a fascinating picture of the change, revolution, and continuity that were encountered by women of this time. A thorough and well-balanced selection of individual chapters by leading field experts and dynamic new scholars, combine original research with a discussion of current secondary literature, and the contributors examine areas as diverse as the Enlightenment, politics, religion, education, sexuality, family, work, poverty, and consumption. The authors most importantly realise that female historical experience is not generic, and that it can be significantly affected by factors such as social status, location, age, race and religion. Providing a captivating overview of women and their lives, this book is an essential purchase for the study of women's history, and, providing delightful little gems of knowledge and insight, it will also appeal to any reader with an interest in this fascinating topic.

Gender and Crime in Modern Europe

Author: Margaret L. Arnot

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 266

This work explores the construction of gender norms and examines how they were reflected and reinforced by legal institutional practices in Europe in this period. By taking a gendered approach, criminal prosecution and punishment are discussed in relation to the victims and perpretrators. This volume investigates various representations of femininity by assessing female experiences including wife-beating, divorce, abortion, prostitution, property crime and embezzlement at the work place. In addition, issues such as neglect, sexual abuse and the invention of the juvenile offender are analyzed.

Gender and Power in Irish History

Author: Maryann Gialanella Valiulis

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 244

View: 497

This collection of articles poses the question: What can gender history add to the traditional narrative of Irish history? How can it help us to understand the ways in which power operated in and flowed through Irish society? It is premised on the assumption that men and women are actors in the creation of their society, influenced by the ideology of the period, but also challenging and resisting the assumptions and beliefs of their era. The articles included in this collection are far-ranging and thematically diverse, united by the common theme of gender. While women play a dominant role in its pages, it makes visible the power and presence of men. Sometimes implicit, sometimes explicit, the history written on these pages is a history of the ways in which women and men constructed, negotiated and made visible the roles, ideas and representations that governed their particular society. In so doing, it provides an alternative reading to the traditional narrative of Irish history. This book focuses mainly on the modern period and includes two articles from outside of Ireland which provides a comparative focus. It also includes a theoretical introductory section on the nature of gender history from three leading Irish historians.

Hope and Heartbreak

A Social History of Wales and the Welsh, 1776-1871

Author: Russell Davies

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 559

View: 350

A radically unorthodox portrait of the lives of the Welsh is offered in this social history of Wales from 1789–1870. A large range of social subjects—rich landlords in the south, poor peasants in the north, and such unspeakable persons as bastard children and wizards—are discussed along with engrossing analyses of such unusual institutions as the insane asylum and the rural festival. By interpreting the life experiences and emotions of individual people within Welsh society, this inquiry opens up the fascinating and heretofore hidden world of Wales during the rise of industrial Europe.

Law, Gender, and Injustice

A Legal History of U.S. Women

Author: Joan Hoff

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 580

View: 760

In this widely acclaimed landmark study, Joan Hoff illustrates how women remain second- class citizens under the current legal system and questions whether the continued pursuit of equality based on a one-size-fits-all vision of traditional individual rights is really what will most improve conditions for women in America as they prepare for the twenty-first century. Concluding that equality based on liberal male ideology is no longer an adequate framework for improving women's legal status, Hoff's highly original and incisive volume calls for a demystification of legal doctrine and a reinterpretation of legal texts (including the Constitution) to create a feminist jurisprudence.

Victorian Women, Unwed Mothers and the London Foundling Hospital

Author: Jessica A. Sheetz-Nguyen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 928

This volume seeks to address the questions of poverty, charity, and public welfare, taking the nineteenth-century London Foundling Hospital as its focus. It delineates the social rules that constructed the gendered world of the Victorian age, and uses 'respectability' as a factor for analysis: the women who successfully petitioned the Foundling Hospital for admission of their infants were not East End prostitutes, but rather unmarried women, often domestic servants, determined to maintain social respectability. The administrators of the Foundling Hospital reviewed over two hundred petitions annually; deliberated on about one hundred cases; and accepted not more than 25 per cent of all cases. Using primary material from the Foundling Hospital's extensive archives, this study moves methodically from the broad social and geographical context of London and the Foundling Hospital itself, to the micro-historical case data of individual mothers and infants.

Knowledge of Evil

Author: Alyson Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 209

This book aims to document and analyse the enduring involvement of children in the commercial sex trade in twentieth-century England. It uncovers new evidence to indicate the extent of under-age prostitution over this period, a much-neglected subject despite the increased visibility of children more generally. The authors argue that child prostitution needs to be understood within a broader context of child abuse, and that this provides one of the clearest manifestations of the way in which 'deviant groups' can be conceived of as both victims and threats. The picture of child prostitution which emerges is one of exclusion from mainstream society and the law, and remoteness from the agencies set up to help young people in trouble, which were often reluctant to accept the realities of child prostitution. The evidence provided in this book indicates that the circumstances which have led young people into prostitution over the last hundred years amount, at worst, to physical or psychological abuse or neglect, and at best as the result of limited choice.

Feminism and Criminal Justice

A Historical Perspective

Author: Anne Logan

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 256

View: 253

This book provides a comprehensive study of the neglected story of the involvement of the women's movement with criminal justice policy in the 20th century. Taking the topic from the suffragette era to the early days of second-wave feminism, the book argues that criminal justice policy has been a continual concern for feminists.

The Politics of Gender in Victorian Britain

Masculinity, Political Culture and the Struggle for Women's Rights

Author: Ben Griffin

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 758

This groundbreaking history of Victorian politics, feminism and parliamentary reform challenges traditional assumptions about the development of British democracy and the struggle for women's rights and demonstrates how political activity has been shaped by changes in the history of masculinity. From the second half of the nineteenth century, Britain's all-male parliament began to transform the legal position of women as it reformed laws that had upheld male authority for centuries. To explain these revolutionary changes, Ben Griffin looks beyond the actions of the women's movement alone and shows how the behaviour and ideologies of male politicians were fundamentally shaped by their gender. He argues that changes to women's rights were the result not simply of changing ideas about women but also of changing beliefs about masculinity, religion and the nature of the constitution, and, in doing so, demonstrates how gender inequality can be created and reproduced by the state.